namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammāsambuddhassa

皈敬世尊、阿羅漢、正等正覺者


Parallel Reading (paragraph granularity) of The Buddha's Path of Wisdom-- Dhammapada (Dhp.)-- Fulltext



  • This parallel Reading (paragraph granularity) including following version:
    • Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
    • Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
    • Translated from the Pali by Ven Nārada Thera ) [3]
    • Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
    • Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]
    • Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
    • Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]
    • Cited from DLMBS [8]

Content of Dhammapada
1_Yamakavaggo (Dhp.1-20) 2_Appamādavaggo (Dhp.21-32) 3_Cittavaggo (Dhp.33-43) 4_Pupphavaggo (Dhp.44-59) 5_Bālavaggo (Dhp.60-75) 6_Paṇḍitavaggo (Dhp.76-89)
  1. The Pairs
  1. Heedfulness
  1. The Mind
  1. Flower
  1. The Fool
  1. The Wise Man
Content of Dhammapada
7_Arahantavaggo (Dhp.90-99) 8_Sahassavaggo (Dhp.100-115) 9_Pāpavaggo (Dhp.116-128) 10_Daṇḍavaggo (Dhp.129-145) 11_Jarāvaggo (Dhp.146-156) 12_Attavaggo (Dhp.157-166)
  1. The Arahat
  1. The Thousands
  1. Evil
  1. Violence
  1. Old Age
  1. The Self
Content of Dhammapada
13_Lokavaggo (Dhp.167-178) 14_Buddhavaggo (Dhp.179-196) 15_Sukhavaggo (Dhp.197-208) 16_Piyavaggo (Dhp.209~220) 17_Kodhavaggo (Dhp.221-234) 18_Malavaggo (Dhp.235-255)
  1. The World
  1. The Buddha
  1. Happiness
  1. Affection
  1. Anger
  1. Impurity
Content of Dhammapada
19_Dhammaṭṭhavaggo (Dhp.256-272) 20_Maggavaggo (Dhp.273-289) 21_Pakiṇṇakavaggo (Dhp.290-305) 22_Nirayavaggo (Dhp.306-319) 23_Nāgavaggo (Dhp.320-333) 24_Taṇhāvaggo (Dhp.334-359)
  1. The Just
  1. The Path
  1. Miscellaneous
  1. The State of Woe
  1. The Elephant
  1. Craving
Content of Dhammapada
25_Bhikkhuvaggo (Dhp.360-382) 26_Brāhmaṇavaggo (Dhp.383-423)
  1. The Monk
  1. The Holy Man

the feature in the Pali scriptures which is most prominent and most tiresome to the unsympathetic reader is the repetition of words, sentences and whole paragraphs. This is partly the result of grammar or at least of style. …,…,…,

…,…,…, there is another cause for this tedious peculiarity, namely that for a long period the Pitakas were handed down by oral tradition only. …,…,…,

…,…,…, It may be too that the wearisome and mechanical iteration of the Pali Canon is partly due to the desire of the Sinhalese to lose nothing of the sacred word imparted to them by missionaries from a foreign country, …,…,…,

…,…,…, repetition characterized not only the reports of the discourses but the discourses themselves. No doubt the versions which we have are the result of compressing a free discourse into numbered paragraphs and repetitions: the living word of the Buddha was surely more vivacious and plastic than these stiff tabulations.

(excerpt from: HINDUISM AND BUDDHISM-- AN HISTORICAL SKETCH, BY SIR CHARLES ELIOT; BOOK III-- PALI BUDDHISM, CHAPTER XIII, THE CANON , 2)


content of gatha
Dhp001 Dhp002 Dhp003 Dhp004 Dhp005 Dhp006 Dhp007 Dhp008 Dhp009 Dhp010
Dhp011 Dhp012 Dhp013 Dhp014 Dhp015 Dhp016 Dhp017 Dhp018 Dhp019 Dhp020
Dhp021 Dhp022 Dhp023 Dhp024 Dhp025 Dhp026 Dhp027 Dhp028 Dhp029 Dhp030
Dhp031 Dhp032 Dhp033 Dhp034 Dhp035 Dhp036 Dhp037 Dhp038 Dhp039 Dhp040
Dhp041 Dhp042 Dhp043 Dhp044 Dhp045 Dhp046 Dhp047 Dhp048 Dhp049 Dhp050
Dhp051 Dhp052 Dhp053 Dhp054 Dhp055 Dhp056 Dhp057 Dhp058 Dhp059 Dhp060
Dhp061 Dhp062 Dhp063 Dhp064 Dhp065 Dhp066 Dhp067 Dhp068 Dhp069 Dhp070
Dhp071 Dhp072 Dhp073 Dhp074 Dhp075 Dhp076 Dhp077 Dhp078 Dhp079 Dhp080
Dhp081 Dhp082 Dhp083 Dhp084 Dhp085 Dhp086 Dhp087 Dhp088 Dhp089 Dhp090
Dhp091 Dhp092 Dhp093 Dhp094 Dhp095 Dhp096 Dhp097 Dhp098 Dhp099 Dhp100
Dhp101 Dhp102 Dhp103 Dhp104 Dhp105 Dhp106 Dhp107 Dhp108 Dhp109 Dhp110
Dhp111 Dhp112 Dhp113 Dhp114 Dhp115 Dhp116 Dhp117 Dhp118 Dhp119 Dhp120
Dhp121 Dhp122 Dhp123 Dhp124 Dhp125 Dhp126 Dhp127 Dhp128 Dhp129 Dhp130
Dhp131 Dhp132 Dhp133 Dhp134 Dhp135 Dhp136 Dhp137 Dhp138 Dhp139 Dhp140
Dhp141 Dhp142 Dhp143 Dhp144 Dhp145 Dhp146 Dhp147 Dhp148 Dhp149 Dhp150
Dhp151 Dhp152 Dhp153 Dhp154 Dhp155 Dhp156 Dhp157 Dhp158 Dhp159 Dhp160
Dhp161 Dhp162 Dhp163 Dhp164 Dhp165 Dhp166 Dhp167 Dhp168 Dhp169 Dhp170
Dhp171 Dhp172 Dhp173 Dhp174 Dhp175 Dhp176 Dhp177 Dhp178 Dhp179 Dhp180
Dhp181 Dhp182 Dhp183 Dhp184 Dhp185 Dhp186 Dhp187 Dhp188 Dhp189 Dhp190
Dhp191 Dhp192 Dhp193 Dhp194 Dhp195 Dhp196 Dhp197 Dhp198 Dhp199 Dhp200
Dhp201 Dhp202 Dhp203 Dhp204 Dhp205 Dhp206 Dhp207 Dhp208 Dhp209 Dhp210
Dhp211 Dhp212 Dhp213 Dhp214 Dhp215 Dhp216 Dhp217 Dhp218 Dhp219 Dhp220
Dhp221 Dhp222 Dhp223 Dhp224 Dhp225 Dhp226 Dhp227 Dhp228 Dhp229 Dhp230
Dhp231 Dhp232 Dhp233 Dhp234 Dhp235 Dhp236 Dhp237 Dhp238 Dhp239 Dhp240
Dhp241 Dhp242 Dhp243 Dhp244 Dhp245 Dhp246 Dhp247 Dhp248 Dhp249 Dhp250
Dhp251 Dhp252 Dhp253 Dhp254 Dhp255 Dhp256 Dhp257 Dhp258 Dhp259 Dhp260
Dhp261 Dhp262 Dhp263 Dhp264 Dhp265 Dhp266 Dhp267 Dhp268 Dhp269 Dhp270
Dhp271 Dhp272 Dhp273 Dhp274 Dhp275 Dhp276 Dhp277 Dhp278 Dhp279 Dhp280
Dhp281 Dhp282 Dhp283 Dhp284 Dhp285 Dhp286 Dhp287 Dhp288 Dhp289 Dhp290
Dhp291 Dhp292 Dhp293 Dhp294 Dhp295 Dhp296 Dhp297 Dhp298 Dhp299 Dhp300
Dhp301 Dhp302 Dhp303 Dhp304 Dhp305 Dhp306 Dhp307 Dhp308 Dhp309 Dhp310
Dhp311 Dhp312 Dhp313 Dhp314 Dhp315 Dhp316 Dhp317 Dhp318 Dhp319 Dhp320
Dhp321 Dhp322 Dhp323 Dhp324 Dhp325 Dhp326 Dhp327 Dhp328 Dhp329 Dhp330
Dhp331 Dhp332 Dhp333 Dhp334 Dhp335 Dhp336 Dhp337 Dhp338 Dhp339 Dhp340
Dhp341 Dhp342 Dhp343 Dhp344 Dhp345 Dhp346 Dhp347 Dhp348 Dhp349 Dhp350
Dhp351 Dhp352 Dhp353 Dhp354 Dhp355 Dhp356 Dhp357 Dhp358 Dhp359 Dhp360
Dhp361 Dhp362 Dhp363 Dhp364 Dhp365 Dhp366 Dhp367 Dhp368 Dhp369 Dhp370
Dhp371 Dhp372 Dhp373 Dhp374 Dhp375 Dhp376 Dhp377 Dhp378 Dhp379 Dhp380
Dhp381 Dhp382 Dhp383 Dhp384 Dhp385 Dhp386 Dhp387 Dhp388 Dhp389 Dhp390
Dhp391 Dhp392 Dhp393 Dhp394 Dhp395 Dhp396 Dhp397 Dhp398 Dhp399 Dhp400
Dhp401 Dhp402 Dhp403 Dhp404 Dhp405 Dhp406 Dhp407 Dhp408 Dhp409 Dhp410
Dhp411 Dhp412 Dhp413 Dhp414 Dhp415 Dhp416 Dhp417 Dhp418 Dhp419 Dhp420
Dhp421 Dhp422 Dhp423              

This parallel Reading (paragraph granularity) including following versions, please choose the options you want to parallel-read: (The editor should appreciate the Dhamma friend-- Siong-Ui Te who provides the supporting script)

Dhammapada Dhp. 001
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Yamakavaggo.
1. Manopubbaṅgamā dhammā manoseṭṭhā manomayā
Manasā ce paduṭṭhena bhāsati vā karoti vā
Tato naṃ dukkhamanveti cakkaṃ'va vahato padaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
  1. Yamakavaggo
1. Manopubbaṅgamā dhammā, manoseṭṭhā manomayā;
Manasā ce paduṭṭhena, bhāsati vā karoti vā;
Tato naṃ dukkhamanveti, cakkaṃva vahato padaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

Chapter 1 The Twin Verses (Yamaka [NāradaFn01-01] Vagga)

EVIL BEGETS EVIL

  1. Mind is the forerunner of (all evil) states. [NāradaFn01-02] Mind is chief; mind-made are they. If one speaks or acts with wicked mind, because of that, suffering follows one, even as the wheel follows the hoof of the draught-ox.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]

Dhp I Pairs

  1. Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with an impure mind a person speaks or acts suffering follows him like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]

Dhp I Pairs

1 Phenomena are preceded by the heart,
ruled by the heart,
made of the heart.
If you speak or act
with a corrupted heart,
then suffering follows you —
as the wheel of the cart,
the track of the ox
that pulls it.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]

1. Twinned Verses

1 Mind precedes created things;
Mind’s their chief, from mind they spring.
With tainted mind who speaks or acts,
Pain trails that man like the wheel trails ox-tracks.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter I: The Twin-Verses

1 All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with an evil thought, pain follows him, as the wheel follows the foot of the ox that draws the carriage.
Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 1: The Pairs

DhP 1
All mental phenomena are preceded by mind,
Mind is their master, they are produced by mind.
If somebody speaks or acts
With a corrupted mind,
Hence suffering follows him,
Like the wheel the foot of the bearing animal. [DLMBSFn-V001]
Dhammapada Dhp. 002
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
2. Manopubbaṅgamā dhammā manoseṭṭhā manomayā
Manasā ce pasannena bhāsati vā karoti vā
Tato naṃ sukhamanveti chāyā'va anapāyinī.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
2. Manopubbaṅgamā dhammā, manoseṭṭhā manomayā;
Manasā ce pasannena, bhāsati vā karoti vā;
Tato naṃ sukhamanveti, chāyāva anapāyinī [anupāyinī (ka.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

GOOD BEGETS GOOD

  1. Mind is the forerunner of (all good) states. Mind is chief; mind-made are they. If one speaks or acts with pure mind, because of that, happiness follows one, even as one's shadow that never leaves. [NāradaFn01-03]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Mind precedes all mental states. Mind is their chief; they are all mind-wrought. If with a pure mind a person speaks or acts happiness follows him like his never-departing shadow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
2 Phenomena are preceded by the heart,
ruled by the heart,
made of the heart.
If you speak or act
with a calm, bright heart,
then happiness follows you,
like a shadow
that never leaves. [ThaniSFn-V1-2]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
2 Mind precedes created things,
Mind’s their chief, from mind they spring.
Who speaks or acts with purified mind,
Joy trails that man, like his shadow, behind.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 2 All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speaks or acts with a pure thought, happiness follows him, like a shadow that never leaves him.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 2
All things are preceded by mind,
Mind is their master, they are produced by mind.
If somebody speaks or acts
With a purified mind,
Hence happiness follows him,
Like never departing shadow. [DLMBSFn-V002]
Dhammapada Dhp. 003
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
3. Akkocchi maṃ avadhi maṃ ajini maṃ ahāsi me
Ye taṃ upanayhanti veraṃ tesaṃ na sammati.

(3 Ākrośanmāmavocanmāma jayanmāmahāpayat
Atra ye upanahyante vairaṃ teṣāṃ na śāmyati.)
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
3. Akkocchi maṃ avadhi maṃ, ajini [ajinī (?)] maṃ ahāsi me;
Ye ca taṃ upanayhanti, veraṃ tesaṃ na sammati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

RETALIATION DOES NOT LEAD TO PEACE

  1. "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me", in those who harbour such thoughts hatred is not appeased.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
3 'He insulted me,
hit me,
beat me,
robbed me'
— for those who brood on this,
hostility isn't stilled.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
3 “Me, she swore at”.
“Me, he flogged”.
“Me, defeated”.
“Me, she robbed”.
Those with hateful thoughts thus held,
Hatred in those ones will never be quelled.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 3 "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,"--in those who harbour such thoughts hatred will never cease.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 3
He abused me, he beat me,
He defeated me, he robbed me.
Those, who harbour such thoughts,
Their hatred is not appeased. [DLMBSFn-V003]
Dhammapada Dhp. 004
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
4. Akkocchi maṃ avadhi maṃ ajini maṃ ahāsi me
Ye taṃ na upanayhanti veraṃ tesūpasammati.

[ 4 Ākrośanmāmavocanamāmajayanmāmahāpayat
Atra ye nopanahyante vairaṃ teṣāṃ praśāmyati.
(Mūlasarvāstivādivinaya. Kośāmbakavastu) ]
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
4. Akkocchi maṃ avadhi maṃ, ajini maṃ ahāsi me;
Ye ca taṃ nupanayhanti, veraṃ tesūpasammati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me", in those who do not harbour such thoughts hatred is appeased. [NāradaFn01-04]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who do not harbor such thoughts still their hatred.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
4 'He insulted me,
hit me,
beat me,
robbed me' —
for those who don't brood on this,
hostility is stilled.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
4 “Me, she swore at”.
“Me, he flogged”.
“Me, defeated”.
“Me, she robbed”.
Those who live such thoughts not held,
Hatred in those ones is utterly quelled.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 4 "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,"--in those who do not harbour such thoughts hatred will cease.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 4
He abused me, he beat me,
He defeated me, he robbed me.
Those, who do not harbour such thoughts,
Their hatred is appeased. [DLMBSFn-V004]
Dhammapada Dhp. 005
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
5. Na hi verena verāni sammantīdha kudācanaṃ
Averena ca sammanti esa dhammo sanantano.

(5 Na hi vaireṇa vairāṇi śāmyantīha kadācana
Kṣāntyā vairāṇi śāmyanti eṣa dharma: sanātana: )
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
5. Na hi verena verāni, sammantīdha kudācanaṃ;
Averena ca sammanti, esa dhammo sanantano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

ANGER IS CONQUERED BY LOVE

  1. Hatreds never cease through hatred in this world; through love [NāradaFn01-05] alone they cease. This is an eternal law. [NāradaFn01-06]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
5 Hostilities aren't stilled
through hostility,
regardless.
Hostilities are stilled
through non-hostility:
this, an unending truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
5 Hatred by hatred has been pacified
Never, in all of creation.
Through freedom from hatred does hatred subside:
This law is of ageless duration.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 5 For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love, this is an old rule.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 5
Hatred is indeed never appeased by hatred here.
It is appeased by non-hatred - this law is eternal. [DLMBSFn-V005]
Dhammapada Dhp. 006
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
6. Pare ca na vijānanti mayamettha yamāmase
Ye ca tattha vijānanti tato sammanti medhagā.

[ 6 Pare'tra na vijānanti vayamatrodyamāmahe
Atra ye tu vijānanti teṣāṃ śāmyanti medhakā:
(Mūlasarvāstivādivinaya. Kośāmbakavastu)]
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
6. Pare ca na vijānanti, mayamettha yamāmase;
Ye ca tattha vijānanti, tato sammanti medhagā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

QUARRELS CEASE THROUGH RIGHT THINKING

  1. The others [NāradaFn01-07] know not that in this quarrel we perish; [NāradaFn01-08] those of them who realize it, have their quarrels calmed thereby. [NāradaFn01-09]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. There are those who do not realize that one day we all must die. But those who do realize this settle their quarrels.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
6 Unlike those who don't realize
that we're here on the verge
of perishing,
those who do:
their quarrels are stilled.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
6 Most of men seem not to see
That man should live restrained; [VaradoFn01-1]
For those who have this realised,
Their quarrels fade away.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 6 The world does not know that we must all come to an end here;--but those who know it, their quarrels cease at once.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 6
The others do not understand that we should restrain ourselves here.
Those who understand that, therefore appease their quarrels. [DLMBSFn-V006]
Dhammapada Dhp. 007
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
7. Subhānupassiṃ viharantaṃ indriyesu asaṃvutaṃ
Bhojanambhi amattaññuṃ kusītaṃ hīnavīriyaṃ
Taṃ ve pasahati māro vāto rukkhaṃ'va dubbalaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
7. Subhānupassiṃ viharantaṃ, indriyesu asaṃvutaṃ;
Bhojanamhi cāmattaññuṃ, kusītaṃ hīnavīriyaṃ;
Taṃ ve pasahati māro, vāto rukkhaṃva dubbalaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE WEAK SUCCUMB TO TEMPTATION BUT NOT THE STRONG

  1. Whoever lives contemplating pleasant things, [NāradaFn01-10] with senses unrestrained, in food immoderate, indolent, inactive, him verily Màra [NāradaFn01-11] overthrows, as the wind (overthrows) a weak tree.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Just as a storm throws down a weak tree, so does Mara overpower the man who lives for the pursuit of pleasures, who is uncontrolled in his senses, immoderate in eating, indolent, and dissipated. [BudRkFn01-01]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
7 One who stays focused on the beautiful,
is unrestrained with the senses,
knowing no moderation in food,
apathetic, unenergetic:
Mara overcomes him
as the wind, a weak tree.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
7 One with senses unsubdued,
And indulgent with his food,
Living languid and at leisure,
Contemplating sensual pleasure:
Him, will Mara soon defeat,
Like the wind, a tree that’s weak.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 7 He who lives looking for pleasures only, his senses uncontrolled, immoderate in his food, idle, and weak, Mara (the tempter) will certainly overthrow him, as the wind throws down a weak tree.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 7
The person, who lives contemplating pleasant things, who is not restrained in senses,
Who does not know moderation in food, who is indolent and of poor effort,
Mara will overcome him, as wind a weak tree. [DLMBSFn-V007]
Dhammapada Dhp. 008
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
8. Asubhānupassiṃ viharantaṃ indriyesu susaṃvutaṃ
Bhojanambhi ca mattaññuṃ saddhaṃ āraddhavīriyaṃ
Taṃ ve nappasahati māro vāto selaṃ'va pabbataṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
8. Asubhānupassiṃ viharantaṃ, indriyesu susaṃvutaṃ;
Bhojanamhi ca mattaññuṃ, saddhaṃ āraddhavīriyaṃ;
Taṃ ve nappasahati māro, vāto selaṃva pabbataṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. Whoever lives contemplating "the Impurities", [NāradaFn01-12] with senses restrained, in food moderate, full of faith, [NāradaFn01-13] full of sustained energy, him Màra overthrows not, as the wind (does not overthrow) a rocky mountain. [NāradaFn01-14]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Just as a storm cannot prevail against a rocky mountain, so Mara can never overpower the man who lives meditating on the impurities, who is controlled in his senses, moderate in eating, and filled with faith and earnest effort. [BudRkFn01-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
8 One who stays focused on the foul,
is restrained with regard to the senses,
knowing moderation in food,
full of conviction & energy:
Mara does not overcome him
as the wind, a mountain of rock. [ThaniSFn-V7-8]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
8 One with faith and self-exertion,
Body-foulness contemplation,
With his senses well-subdued,
Not excessive with his food:
Him, will Mara not defeat,
Nor will wind, a granite peak.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 8 He who lives without looking for pleasures, his senses well controlled, moderate in his food, faithful and strong, him Mara will certainly not overthrow, any more than the wind throws down a rocky mountain.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 8
The one, who does not live contemplating pleasant things, who is well restrained in senses,
Who does know moderation in food, who is trusting and firm in effort,
Mara will not overcome him, as wind a rocky mountain. [DLMBSFn-V008]
Dhammapada Dhp. 009
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
9. Anikkasāvo kāsāvaṃ yo vatthaṃ paridahessati
Apeto damasaccena na so kāsāvamarahati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
9. Anikkasāvo kāsāvaṃ, yo vatthaṃ paridahissati;
Apeto damasaccena, na so kāsāvamarahati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE PURE ARE WORTHY OF THE YELLOW ROBE BUT NOT THE IMPURE

  1. Whoever, unstainless, without self control and truthfulness, should don the yellow robe, [NāradaFn01-15] is not worthy of it.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Whoever being depraved, devoid of self-control and truthfulness, should don the monk's yellow robe, he surely is not worthy of the robe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
9 He who, depraved,
devoid
of truthfulness
& self-control,
puts on the ochre robe,
doesn't deserve the ochre robe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
9 The man not free of inward taints,
In ochre tints ordained,
Who’s full of lies and unrestrained,
Does not deserve that ochre stain.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 9 He who wishes to put on the yellow dress without having cleansed himself from sin, who disregards temperance and truth, is unworthy of the yellow dress.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 9
Who is not rid of defilement, and will wear a yellow robe,
Devoid of restraint and truth, he does not deserve a yellow robe. [DLMBSFn-V009]
Dhammapada Dhp. 010
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
10. Yo ca vantakasāvassa sīlesu susamāhito
Upeto damasaccena sa ve kāsāvamarahati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
10. Yo ca vantakasāvassa, sīlesu susamāhito;
Upeto damasaccena, sa ve kāsāvamarahati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. He who is purged of all stain, is well-established in morals and endowed with self-control and truthfulness, is indeed worthy of the yellow robe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. But whoever is purged of depravity, well-established in virtues and filled with self-control and truthfulness, he indeed is worthy of the yellow robe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
10 But he who is free
of depravity
endowed
with truthfulness
& self-control,
well-established
in the precepts,
truly deserves the ochre robe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
10 Whatever monk is purged of taints,
With virtue well-ingrained,
A man sincere and well restrained,
Is worthy of the ochre stain.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 10 But he who has cleansed himself from sin, is well grounded in all virtues, and regards also temperance and truth, he is indeed worthy of the yellow dress.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 10
And who would get rid of defilement, well settled in virtues,
Endowed with restraint and truth, he deserves a yellow robe. [DLMBSFn-V010]
Dhammapada Dhp. 011
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
11. Asāre sāramatino sāre cāsāradassino
Te sāraṃ nādhigacchanti micchāsaṃkappagocarā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
11. Asāre sāramatino, sāre cāsāradassino;
Te sāraṃ nādhigacchanti, micchāsaṅkappagocarā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

RIGHT PERCEPTION LEADS TO THE REALIZATION OF THE TRUTH

  1. In the unessential they imagine the essential [NāradaFn01-16] , in the essential they see the unessential - they who entertain (such) wrong thoughts [NāradaFn01-17] never realize the essence.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Those who mistake the unessential to be essential and the essential to be unessential, dwelling in wrong thoughts, never arrive at the essential.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
11 Those who regard
non-essence as essence
and see essence as non-,
don't get to the essence,
ranging about in wrong resolves.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
11 Quintessence they see as non-essence;
Non-essence they see as quintessence;
And they in wrong thoughts acquiescent,
Will never discover quintessence.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 11 They who imagine truth in untruth, and see untruth in truth, never arrive at truth, but follow vain desires.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 11
Thinking to be essential, what is not, seeing no essence in what is essential,
they, feeding on wrong thoughts, do not discover the essence. [DLMBSFn-V011]
Dhammapada Dhp. 012
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
12. Sārañca sārato ñatvā asārañca asārato
Te sāraṃ adhigacchanti sammāsaṃkappagocarā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
12. Sārañca sārato ñatvā, asārañca asārato;
Te sāraṃ adhigacchanti, sammāsaṅkappagocarā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. What is essential they regard as essential, what is unessential they regard as unessential - they who entertain (such) right thoughts [NāradaFn01-18] realize the essence.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Those who know the essential to be essential and the unessential to be unessential, dwelling in right thoughts, do arrive at the essential.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
12 But those who know
essence as essence,
and non-essence as non-,
get to the essence,
ranging about in right resolves. [ThaniSFn-V11-12]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
12 Quintessence they see as quintessence,
Non-essence they see as non-essence,
And they in right thoughts acquiescent,
Go on to discover quintessence.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 12 They who know truth in truth, and untruth in untruth, arrive at truth, and follow true desires.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 12
Having known the essence as the essence, non-essential as non-essential,
they, feeding on right thoughts, discover the essence. [DLMBSFn-V012]
Dhammapada Dhp. 013
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
13. Yathāgāraṃ ducchannaṃ vuṭṭhi samativijjhati
Evaṃ abhāvitaṃ cittaṃ rāgo samativijjhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
13. Yathā agāraṃ ducchannaṃ, vuṭṭhī samativijjhati;
Evaṃ abhāvitaṃ cittaṃ, rāgo samativijjhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

LUST PIERCES THE HEARTS OF THE UNDEVELOPED BUT NOT THOSE OF THE DEVELOPED

  1. Even as rain penetrates as ill-thatched house, so does lust penetrate an undeveloped mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Just as rain breaks through an ill-thatched house, so passion penetrates an undeveloped mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
13 As rain seeps into
an ill-thatched hut,
so passion,
the undeveloped mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
13 & 14 Like ill-thatched huts let in the rain,
Is lust let in by minds untrained.
In well-roofed huts no water leaks:
In well-trained minds no passion seeps.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 13 As rain breaks through an ill-thatched house, passion will break through an unreflecting mind.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 13
As a poorly covered house is penetrated by a rain,
thus an undeveloped mind is penetrated by passion. [DLMBSFn-V013]
Dhammapada Dhp. 014
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
14. Yathāgāraṃ succhannaṃ vuṭṭhi na samativijjhati
Evaṃ subhāvitaṃ cittaṃ rāgo na samativijjhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
14. Yathā agāraṃ suchannaṃ, vuṭṭhī na samativijjhati;
Evaṃ subhāvitaṃ cittaṃ, rāgo na samativijjhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. Even as rain does not penetrate a well-thatched house, so does lust not penetrate a well-developed [NāradaFn01-19] mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Just as rain does not break through a well-thatched house, so passion never penetrates a well-developed mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
14 As rain doesn't seep into
a well-thatched hut,
so passion does not,
the well-developed mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
13 & 14 Like ill-thatched huts let in the rain,
Is lust let in by minds untrained.
In well-roofed huts no water leaks:
In well-trained minds no passion seeps.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 14 As rain does not break through a well-thatched house, passion will not break through a well-reflecting mind.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 14
As a well covered house is not penetrated by a rain,
thus a well developed mind is not penetrated by passion. [DLMBSFn-V014]
Dhammapada Dhp. 015
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
15. Idha socati pecca socati pāpakārī ubhayattha socati
So socati so vihaññati disvā kamma kiliṭṭhamattano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
15. Idha socati pecca socati, pāpakārī ubhayattha socati;
So socati so vihaññati, disvā kammakiliṭṭhamattano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

EVIL-DOERS SUFFER HERE AND HEREAFTER

  1. Here he grieves, [NāradaFn01-20] hereafter he grieves. [NāradaFn01-21] In both states the evil-doer grieves. He grieves, he is afflicted, perceiving the impurity of his own deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The evil-doer grieves here and hereafter; he grieves in both the worlds. He laments and is afflicted, recollecting his own impure deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
15 Here he grieves
he grieves hereafter.
In both worlds
the wrong-doer grieves.
He grieves, he's afflicted,
seeing the corruption
of his deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6] 15 Evil-doers sorrow in both present and future lives. They sorrow and grieve, having realised their own defiled conduct.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 15 The evil-doer mourns in this world, and he mourns in the next; he mourns in both. He mourns and suffers when he sees the evil of his own work.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 15
He grieves here, he grieves after death, in both states does the wrongdoer grieve.
He grieves, he is vexed, having seen his own evil deeds. [DLMBSFn-V015]
Dhammapada Dhp. 016
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
16. Idha modati pecca modati katapuñño ubhayattha modati
So modati so pamodati disvā kamma visuddhimattano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
16. Idha modati pecca modati, katapuñño ubhayattha modati;
So modati so pamodati, disvā kammavisuddhimattano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

HAPPY ARE THE WELL-DOERS HERE AND HEREAFTER

  1. Here he rejoices, [NāradaFn01-22] hereafter he rejoices. [NāradaFn01-23] In both states the well-doer rejoices. He rejoices, exceedingly rejoices, perceiving the purity of his own deeds. [NāradaFn01-24]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The doer of good rejoices here and hereafter; he rejoices in both the worlds. He rejoices and exults, recollecting his own pure deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
16 Here he rejoices
he rejoices hereafter.
In both worlds
the merit-maker rejoices.
He rejoices, is jubilant,
seeing the purity
of his deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6] 16 Kind people are happy in both present and future lives. They are happy and satisfied, having realised their own pure conduct.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 16 The virtuous man delights in this world, and he delights in the next; he delights in both. He delights and rejoices, when he sees the purity of his own work.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 16
He rejoices here, he rejoices after death, in both states does the well-doer rejoice.
He rejoices, he is happy, having seen his own good deeds. [DLMBSFn-V016]
Dhammapada Dhp. 017
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
17. Idha tappati pecca tappati pāpakārī ubhayattha tappati
Pāpaṃ me katanti tappati bhiyyo tappati duggatiṃ gato.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
17. Idha tappati pecca tappati, pāpakārī [pāpakāri (?)] ubhayattha tappati;
‘‘Pāpaṃ me kata’’nti tappati, bhiyyo [bhīyo (sī.)] tappati duggatiṃ gato.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE EVIL-DOER LAMENTS HERE AND HEREAFTER

  1. Here he suffers, hereafter he suffers. In both states the evil-doer suffers. "Evil have I done" (thinking thus), he suffers. Furthermore, he suffers, having gone to a woeful state. [NāradaFn01-25]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The evil-doer suffers here and hereafter; he suffers in both the worlds. The thought, "Evil have I done," torments him, and he suffers even more when gone to realms of woe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
17 Here he's tormented
he's tormented hereafter.
In both worlds
the wrong-doer's tormented.
He's tormented at the thought,
'I've done wrong.'
Having gone to a bad destination,
he's tormented
all the more.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
17 Here he regrets,
Hereafter regrets,
In both worlds the doer of evil regrets.

“I have done evil” -
The thought makes him mourn.
Still more he regrets when in low realms he’s born.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 17 The evil-doer suffers in this world, and he suffers in the next; he suffers in both. He suffers when he thinks of the evil he has done; he suffers more when going on the evil path.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 17
He is tormented here, he is tormented after death, in both states is the wrongdoer tormented.
He is tormented [by the thought] "I have done evil". He is tormented even more, having gone to a bad birth. [DLMBSFn-V017]
Dhammapada Dhp. 018
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
18. Idha nandati pecca nandati pāpakārī ubhayattha nandati
Pāpaṃ me katanti nandati bhiyyo nandati suggatiṃ gato.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
18. Idha nandati pecca nandati, katapuñño ubhayattha nandati;
‘‘Puññaṃ me kata’’nti nandati, bhiyyo nandati suggatiṃ gato.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

HAPPY ARE THE RIGHTEOUS

  1. Here he is happy, hereafter he is happy. In both states the well-doer is happy. "Good have I done" (thinking thus), he is happy. Furthermore, he is happy, having gone to a blissful state.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The doer of good delights here and hereafter; he delights in both the worlds. The thought, "Good have I done," delights him, and he delights even more when gone to realms of bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
18 Here he delights
he delights hereafter.
In both worlds
the merit-maker delights.
He delights at the thought,
'I've made merit.'
Having gone to a good destination,
he delights
all the more. [ThaniSFn-V17-18]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
18 Here he’s delighted,
Hereafter delighted,
In both worlds the maker of merit’s delighted.

“I have made merit!” -
His glad exultation.
He’s happy still more with his good destination.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 18 The virtuous man is happy in this world, and he is happy in the next; he is happy in both. He is happy when he thinks of the good he has done; he is still more happy when going on the good path.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 18
He is delighted here, he is delighted after death, in both states is the well-doer delighted.
He is delighted [by the thought] "I have done good". He is delighted even more, having gone to a good birth. [DLMBSFn-V018]
Dhammapada Dhp. 019
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
19. Bahumpi ce sahitaṃ bhāsamāno
Na takkaro hoti naro pamatto
Gopo'va gāvo gaṇayaṃ paresaṃ
Na bhāgavā sāmaññassa hoti.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
19. Bahumpi ce saṃhita [sahitaṃ (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)] bhāsamāno, na takkaro hoti naro pamatto;
Gopova gāvo gaṇayaṃ paresaṃ, na bhāgavā sāmaññassa hoti.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

LEARNING WITHOUT PRACTICE IS OF NO WORTH

  1. Though much he recites the Sacred Texts, [NāradaFn01-26] but acts not accordingly, that heedless man is like a cowherd who counts others' kine. He has no share in the fruits [NāradaFn01-27] of the Holy Life. [NāradaFn01-28]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Much though he recites the sacred texts, but acts not accordingly, that heedless man is like a cowherd who only counts the cows of others — he does not partake of the blessings of the holy life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
19 If he recites many teachings, but
— heedless man —
doesn't do what they say,
like a cowherd counting the cattle of
others,
he has no share in the contemplative life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6] 19 Although he frequently recites the scriptures, a heedless person fails to put them into practice. He is like a cowherd, counting others’ cattle. He has no real share in the life of asceticism.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 19 The thoughtless man, even if he can recite a large portion (of the law), but is not a doer of it, has no share in the priesthood, but is like a cowherd counting the cows of others.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 19
Even if he recites a lot of scriptures, but does not act accordingly, the negligent man.
He is like a cowherd who counts others' cows. He does not share the [blessings of] monkshood. [DLMBSFn-V019]
Dhammapada Dhp. 020
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
20. Appampi ce sahitaṃ bhāsamāno20
Dhammassa hoti anudhammacārī
Rāgañca dosañca pahāya mohaṃ
Sammappajāno suvimuttacitto
Anupādiyāno idha vā huraṃ vā
Sa bhāgavā sāmaññassa hoti.

Yamakavaggo paṭhamo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
20. Appampi ce saṃhita bhāsamāno, dhammassa hoti [hotī (sī. pī.)] anudhammacārī;
Rāgañca dosañca pahāya mohaṃ, sammappajāno suvimuttacitto;
Anupādiyāno idha vā huraṃ vā, sa bhāgavā sāmaññassa hoti.

Yamakavaggo paṭhamo niṭṭhito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. Though little he recites the Sacred Texts, but acts in accordance with the teaching, forsaking lust, hatred and ignorance, truly knowing, with mind well freed, clinging to naught here and hereafter, he shares the fruits of the Holy Life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Little though he recites the sacred texts, but puts the Teaching into practice, forsaking lust, hatred, and delusion, with true wisdom and emancipated mind, clinging to nothing of this or any other world — he indeed partakes of the blessings of a holy life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
20 If he recites next to nothing
but follows the Dhamma
in line with the Dhamma;
abandoning passion,
aversion, delusion;
alert,
his mind well-released,
not clinging
either here or hereafter:
he has his share in the contemplative life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
20 Although a person infrequently recites the scriptures
if he practises in accordance with Dhamma;
if he has abandoned greed, hatred and delusion;
if he possesses right knowledge;
if his mind is liberated;
if he is attached to nothing in the human or deva realms,
he has a real share in the life of asceticism.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 20 The follower of the law, even if he can recite only a small portion (of the law), but, having forsaken passion and hatred and foolishness, possesses true knowledge and serenity of mind, he, caring for nothing in this world or that to come, has indeed a share in the priesthood.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 20
Even if he recites a little of scriptures, but lives in truth according to the Dharma,
having abandoned lust, hatred and delusion, has the right knowledge, with a well emancipated mind,
is not attached to anything, either in this world, nor in the other one, he shares the [blessings of] monkshood. [DLMBSFn-V020]
Dhammapada Dhp. 021
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Appamādavaggo.
21. Appamādo amatapadaṃ pamādo maccuno padaṃ
Appamattā na mīyanti ye pamattā yathā matā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
2. Appamādavaggo
21. Appamādo amatapadaṃ [amataṃ padaṃ (ka.)], pamādo maccuno padaṃ;
Appamattā na mīyanti, ye pamattā yathā matā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

Chapter 2 Heedfulness

THE HEEDLESS DIE; THE HEEDFUL DO NOT

  1. Heedfulness [NāradaFn02-01] is the path to the deathless, [NāradaFn02-02] heedlessness is the path to death. The heedful do not die; [NāradaFn02-03] the heedless are like unto the dead.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]

Dhp II Heedfulness

  1. Heedfulness is the path to the Deathless. Heedlessness is the path to death. The heedful die not. The heedless are as if dead already. [BudRkFn02-01]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]

Dhp II Heedfulness

21 Heedfulness: the path to the Deathless.
Heedlessness: the path to death.
The heedful do not die.
The heedless are as if
already dead. [ThaniSFn-V21]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]

2. Diligence

21 Diligence is the path to the Deathless,
And negligence the pathway to death.
They perish not, those who are diligent;
The negligent are like unto the dead.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter II: On Earnestness

21 Earnestness is the path of immortality (Nirvana), thoughtlessness the path of death. Those who are in earnest do not die, those who are thoughtless are as if dead already.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 2: Conscientiousness

DhP 21
Conscientiousness is the state of deathlessness. Negligence is the state of death.
The conscientious ones do not die. Those, who are negligent, are as if dead. [DLMBSFn-V021]
Dhammapada Dhp. 022
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
22. Etaṃ visesato ñatvā appamādamhi paṇḍitā
Appamāde pamodanti ariyānaṃ gocare ratā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
22. Evaṃ [etaṃ (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)] visesato ñatvā, appamādamhi paṇḍitā;
Appamāde pamodanti, ariyānaṃ gocare ratā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. Distinctly understanding this (difference [NāradaFn02-04] ), the wise (intent) on heedfulness rejoice in heedfulness, delighting in the realm of the Ariyas. [NāradaFn02-05]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Clearly understanding this excellence of heedfulness, the wise exult therein and enjoy the resort of the Noble Ones. [BudRkFn02-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
22 Knowing this as a true distinction,
those wise in heedfulness
rejoice in heedfulness,
enjoying the range of the noble ones. [ThaniSFn-V22]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
22&23 The wise, recognising the special quality of diligence, rejoice in it, delighting in the realm of morally outstanding people (ariyans). They apply themselves constantly and unwaveringly. The steadfast reach Nibbana, ultimate safety.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 22 Those who are advanced in earnestness, having understood this clearly, delight in earnestness, and rejoice in the knowledge of the Ariyas (the elect).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 22
Having thus distinctively understood about conscientiousness, the wise ones rejoice in conscientiousness, delighting in the sphere of the Noble Ones. [DLMBSFn-V022]
Dhammapada Dhp. 023
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
23. Te jhāyino sātatikā niccaṃ daḷhaparakkamā
Phusanti dhīrā nibbāṇaṃ yogakkhemaṃ anuttaraṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
23. Te jhāyino sātatikā, niccaṃ daḷhaparakkamā;
Phusanti dhīrā nibbānaṃ, yogakkhemaṃ anuttaraṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. The constantly meditative, [NāradaFn02-06] the ever steadfast ones realize the bond-free, [NāradaFn02-07] supreme Nibbàna. [NāradaFn02-08]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The wise ones, ever meditative and steadfastly persevering, alone experience Nibbana, the incomparable freedom from bondage.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
23 The enlightened, constantly
absorbed in jhana,
persevering,
firm in their effort:
they touch Unbinding,
the unexcelled rest
from the yoke. [ThaniSFn-V23]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
22&23 The wise, recognising the special quality of diligence, rejoice in it, delighting in the realm of morally outstanding people (ariyans). They apply themselves constantly and unwaveringly. The steadfast reach Nibbana, ultimate safety.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 23 These wise people, meditative, steady, always possessed of strong powers, attain to Nirvana, the highest happiness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 23
Those meditating perseveringly, constantly with strong effort,
those clever ones touch the Nirvana, the highest peace from bondage. [DLMBSFn-V023]
Dhammapada Dhp. 024
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
24. Uṭṭhānavato satimato sucikammassa nisammakārino
Saññatassa ca dhammajīvino appamattassa yaso'bhivaḍḍhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
24. Uṭṭhānavato satīmato [satimato (sī. syā. ka.)], sucikammassa nisammakārino;
Saññatassa dhammajīvino, appamattassa [apamattassa (?)] yasobhivaḍḍhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE ENERGETIC PROSPER

  1. The glory of him who is energetic, mindful, pure in deed, considerate, self-controlled, right-living, and heedful steadily increases.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Ever grows the glory of him who is energetic, mindful and pure in conduct, discerning and self-controlled, righteous and heedful.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
24 Those with initiative,
mindful,
clean in action,
acting with due consideration,
heedful, restrained,
living the Dhamma:
their glory
grows.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
24 People who are
energetic,
attentive,
pure in conduct,
careful in conduct,
restrained,
of right livelihood,
diligent,
their glory grows.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 24 If an earnest person has roused himself, if he is not forgetful, if his deeds are pure, if he acts with consideration, if he restrains himself, and lives according to law,--then his glory will increase.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 24
The good repute of someone, who is energetic, mindful, of pure deeds, acting
considerately, self-controlled, living righteously and conscientious, increases. [DLMBSFn-V024]
Dhammapada Dhp. 025
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
25. Uṭṭhānenappamādena saññamena damena ca
Dīpaṃ kayirātha medhāvī yaṃ ogho nābhikīrati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
25. Uṭṭhānenappamādena , saṃyamena damena ca;
Dīpaṃ kayirātha medhāvī, yaṃ ogho nābhikīrati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

BY THEIR EFFORTS THE WISE CREATE THEIR OWN HEAVENS

  1. By sustained effort, earnestness, discipline, and self-control let the wise man make for himself an island, [NāradaFn02-09] which no flood overwhelms.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. By effort and heedfulness, discipline and self-mastery, let the wise one make for himself an island which no flood can overwhelm.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
25 Through initiative, heedfulness,
restraint, & self-control,
the wise would make
an island
no flood
can submerge.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
25 The wise by means of
energy,
diligence,
sense restraint,
self-taming,
make an island which no flood can destroy.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 25 By rousing himself, by earnestness, by restraint and control, the wise man may make for himself an island which no flood can overwhelm.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 25
By exertion, conscientiousness, self-control and moderation,
a wise should make an island, that a flood can not overwhelm. [DLMBSFn-V025]
Dhammapada Dhp. 026
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
26. Pamādamanuyuñjanti bālā dummedhino janā
Appamādañca medhāvi dhanaṃ seṭṭhaṃ'va rakkhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
26. Pamādamanuyuñjanti, bālā dummedhino janā;
Appamādañca medhāvī, dhanaṃ seṭṭhaṃva rakkhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3] BE HEEDFUL NOT HEEDLESS 26. The ignorant, foolish folk indulge in heedlessness; the wise man guards earnestness as the greatest treasure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The foolish and ignorant indulge in heedlessness, but the wise one keeps his heedfulness as his best treasure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
26 They're addicted to heedlessness
— dullards, fools —
while one who is wise
cherishes heedfulness
as his highest wealth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
26 They’re given to slackness, the dull and inane;
The wise foster diligence, their paramount gain.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 26 Fools follow after vanity, men of evil wisdom. The wise man keeps earnestness as his best jewel.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 26
The fools, the ignorant people give themselves up to negligence.
And the wise one protects conscientiousness as the greatest treasure. [DLMBSFn-V026]
Dhammapada Dhp. 027
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
27. Mā pamādamanuyuñjetha mā kāmarati santhavaṃ
Appamatto hi jhāyanto pappoti vipulaṃ sukhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
27. Mā pamādamanuyuñjetha, mā kāmaratisanthavaṃ [sandhavaṃ (ka)];
Appamatto hi jhāyanto, pappoti vipulaṃ sukhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]
  1. Indulge not in heedlessness; have no intimacy with sensuous delights. Verily, the earnest, meditative person obtains abundant bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Do not give way to heedlessness. Do not indulge in sensual pleasures. Only the heedful and meditative attain great happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
27 Don't give way to heedlessness
or to intimacy
with sensual delight —
for a heedful person,
absorbed in jhana,
attains an abundance of ease.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
27 Don’t be given to negligence;
Turn aside from sensual treats.
The diligent one who meditates
Gets joy that’s abundantly sweet.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 27 Follow not after vanity, nor after the enjoyment of love and lust! He who is earnest and meditative, obtains ample joy.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 27
Don't pursue negligence or intimacy with pleasure delights.
Conscientious practitioner of meditation obtains abundant happiness. [DLMBSFn-V027]
Dhammapada Dhp. 028
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
28. Pamādaṃ appamādena yadā nudati paṇḍito
Paññāpāsādamāruyha asoko sokiniṃ pajaṃ
Pabbataṭṭho'va bhummaṭṭhe dhīro bāle avekkhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
28. Pamādaṃ appamādena, yadā nudati paṇḍito;
Paññāpāsādamāruyha, asoko sokiniṃ pajaṃ;
Pabbataṭṭhova bhūmaṭṭhe [bhummaṭṭhe (sī. syā.)], dhīro bāle avekkhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

HEEDLESSNESS SHOULD BE CONQUERED BY HEEDFULNESS

  1. When an understanding one discards heedlessness by heedfulness, he, free from sorrow, ascends to the palace of wisdom and surveys the sorrowing folk as a wise mountaineer surveys the ignorant groundlings. [NāradaFn02-10]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Just as one upon the summit of a mountain beholds the groundlings, even so when the wise man casts away heedlessness by heedfulness and ascends the high tower of wisdom, this sorrowless sage beholds the sorrowing and foolish multitude.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
28 When the wise person drives out
heedlessness
with heedfulness,
having climbed the high tower
of discernment,
sorrow-free,
he observes the sorrowing crowd —
as the enlightened man,
having scaled
a summit,
the fools on the ground below.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
28 With negligence scattered by diligent power,
The sage ascends great wisdom’s tower.
On the sorrowing masses he looks, free of woe,
As if from a mountain on groundlings below.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 28 When the learned man drives away vanity by earnestness, he, the wise, climbing the terraced heights of wisdom, looks down upon the fools, serene he looks upon the toiling crowd, as one that stands on a mountain looks down upon them that stand upon the plain.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 28
When the wise one expels negligence by conscientiousness,
having climbed the stronghold of wisdom, without sorrow,
such a clever one observes the sorrowing crowd
as somebody standing on a mountain observes the foolish people on the ground. [DLMBSFn-V028]
Dhammapada Dhp. 029
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
29. Appamatto pamattesu suttesu bahujāgaro
Abalassaṃ'va sīghasso hitvā yāti sumedhaso.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
29. Appamatto pamattesu, suttesu bahujāgaro;
Abalassaṃva sīghasso, hitvā yāti sumedhaso.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE STRENUOUS AND THE ALERT OVERTAKE THE THOUGHTLESS AND THE INDOLENT

  1. Heedful amongst the heedless, wide awake amongst the slumbering, the wise man advances as does a swift horse, leaving a weak jade behind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. Heedful among the heedless, wide-awake among the sleepy, the wise man advances like a swift horse leaving behind a weak jade.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
29 Heedful among the heedless,
wakeful among those asleep,
just as a fast horse advances,
leaving the weak behind:
so the wise.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
29 Heedful amongst the oblivious,
Awake in the land of the sleeping,
The wise man proceeds
Like a galloping steed:
Passing faltering jades,
Leaves them standing.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 29 Earnest among the thoughtless, awake among the sleepers, the wise man advances like a racer, leaving behind the hack.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 29
Conscientious amongst the negligent, watchful amongst the sleeping,
the wise one advances like a swift horse, having left behind a weak one. [DLMBSFn-V029]
Dhammapada Dhp. 030
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
30. Appamādena maghavā devānaṃ seṭṭhataṃ gato
Appamādaṃ pasaṃsanti pamādo garahito sadā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
30. Appamādena maghavā, devānaṃ seṭṭhataṃ gato;
Appamādaṃ pasaṃsanti, pamādo garahito sadā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

EARNESTNESS LEADS TO SOVEREIGNTY

  1. By earnestness Maghavà [NāradaFn02-11] rose to the lordship of the gods. [NāradaFn02-12] Earnestness is ever praised; negligence is ever despised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. By Heedfulness did Indra become the overlord of the gods. Heedfulness is ever praised, and heedlessness ever despised. [BudRkFn02-03]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
30 Through heedfulness, Indra won
to lordship over the gods.
Heedfulness is praised,
heedlessness censured —
always.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
30 Sakka, through heedful behaviour,
Was crowned as the sovereign deva.
Thus, heedfulness wins acclamation,
And slackness receives deprecation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 30 By earnestness did Maghavan (Indra) rise to the lordship of the gods. People praise earnestness; thoughtlessness is always blamed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 30
By conscientiousness did Indra become the chief amongst the gods.
Conscientiousness is praised, negligence is always censured. [DLMBSFn-V030]
Dhammapada Dhp. 031
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
31. Appamādarato bhikkhu pamāde bhaya dassivā
Saṃyojanaṃ aṇuṃ thūlaṃ ḍahaṃ aggīva gacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
31. Appamādarato bhikkhu, pamāde bhayadassi vā;
Saṃyojanaṃ aṇuṃ thūlaṃ, ḍahaṃ aggīva gacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE HEEDFUL ADVANCE

  1. The Bhikkhu [NāradaFn02-13] who delights in heedfulness, and looks with fear on heedlessness, advances like fire, burning all fetters [NāradaFn02-14] great and small.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The monk who delights in heedfulness and looks with fear at heedlessness advances like fire, burning all fetters, small and large.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
31 The monk delighting in heedfulness,
seeing danger in heedlessness,
advances like a fire,
burning fetters
great & small.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
31 The monk who in diligence finds his delight,
Looking at negligence with fearful dislike,
Leaping ahead, like a flaming fireball,
Erases his fetters, the great and the small.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 31 A Bhikshu (mendicant) who delights in earnestness, who looks with fear on thoughtlessness, moves about like fire, burning all his fetters, small or large.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 31
The monk, who is devoted to conscientiousness and who is fearful of negligence,
advances like a fire, burning the fetters, small or big. [DLMBSFn-V031]
Dhammapada Dhp. 032
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
32. Appamādarato bhikkhu pamāde bhaya dassivā
Abhabbo parihāṇāya nibbāṇasseva santike.

Appamādavaggo dutiyo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
32. Appamādarato bhikkhu, pamāde bhayadassi vā;
Abhabbo parihānāya, nibbānasseva santike.

Appamādavaggo dutiyo niṭṭhito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera [3]

THE HEEDFUL ARE IN THE PRESENCE OF NIBBâNA

  1. The Bhikkhu who delights in heedfulness, and looks with fear on heedlessness, is not liable to fall. [NāradaFn02-15] He is in the presence of Nibbàna.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita [4]
  1. The monk who delights in heedfulness and looks with fear at heedlessness will not fall. He is close to Nibbana.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu [5]
32 The monk delighting in heedfulness,
seeing danger in heedlessness
— incapable of falling back —
stands right on the verge
of Unbinding.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu [6]
32 The monk who in diligence finds his delight,
Looking at negligence with fearful dislike,
Of falling away, he has no possibility;
He’s brought himself into Nibbana’s vicinity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 32 A Bhikshu (mendicant) who delights in reflection, who looks with fear on thoughtlessness, cannot fall away (from his perfect state)--he is close upon Nirvana.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 32
The monk, who is devoted to conscientiousness and who is fearful of negligence,
unable to regress, he is just in the vicinity of the Nirvana. [DLMBSFn-V032]
Dhammapada Dhp. 033
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]

3. Cittavaggo.

33. Phandanaṃ capalaṃ cittaṃ durakkhaṃ dunnivārayaṃ
Ujuṃ karoti medhāvī usukāro'va tejanaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

3. Cittavaggo

33. Phandanaṃ capalaṃ cittaṃ, dūrakkhaṃ [durakkhaṃ (sabbattha)] dunnivārayaṃ;
Ujuṃ karoti medhāvī, usukārova tejanaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 3 Mind

STRAIGHTEN YOUR FICKLE MIND

  1. The flickering, fickle mind, [NāradaFn03-01] difficult to guard, difficult to control - the wise person straightens it as a fletcher straightens an arrow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp III The Mind

  1. Just as a fletcher straightens an arrow shaft, even so the discerning man straightens his mind — so fickle and unsteady, so difficult to guard.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp III The Mind

33-37

Quivering, wavering,
hard to guard,
to hold in check:
  the mind.
The sage makes it straight —
like a fletcher,
the shaft of an arrow.

Like a fish
pulled from its home in the water
& thrown on land:
this mind flips & flaps about
  to escape Mara's sway.

Hard to hold down,
  nimble,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
Its taming is good.
The mind well-tamed
  brings ease.

So hard to see,
so very, very subtle,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
The wise should guard it.
The mind protected
  brings ease.

Wandering far,
going alone,
bodiless,
lying in a cave:
  the mind.
Those who restrain it:
  from Mara's bonds
  they'll be freed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

3. The Mind

33 This mind, so fickle and disturbed,
Hard to guard, and hard to curb,
The wise ones straighten, just as do
Skilled fletchers make their arrows true.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter III: Thought

33 As a fletcher makes straight his arrow, a wise man makes straight his trembling and unsteady thought, which is difficult to guard, difficult to hold back.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 3: The Mind

DhP 33
The wavering, unsteady mind, hard to guard, difficult to restrain,
the wise one straightens, like an arrow-maker an arrow. [DLMBSFn-V033]
Dhammapada Dhp. 034
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
34. Vārijo'va thale khitto okamokata ubbhato
Pariphandatidaṃ cittaṃ māradheyyaṃ pahātave.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
34. Vārijova thale khitto, okamokataubbhato;
Pariphandatidaṃ cittaṃ, māradheyyaṃ pahātave.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Like a fish that is drawn from its watery abode and thrown upon land, even so does this mind flutter. Hence should the realm of the passions be shunned. [NāradaFn03-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. As a fish when pulled out of water and cast on land throbs and quivers, even so is this mind agitated. Hence should one abandon the realm of Mara.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

33-37

Quivering, wavering,
hard to guard,
to hold in check:
  the mind.
The sage makes it straight —
like a fletcher,
the shaft of an arrow.

Like a fish
pulled from its home in the water
& thrown on land:
this mind flips & flaps about
  to escape Mara's sway.

Hard to hold down,
  nimble,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
Its taming is good.
The mind well-tamed
  brings ease.

So hard to see,
so very, very subtle,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
The wise should guard it.
The mind protected
  brings ease.

Wandering far,
going alone,
bodiless,
lying in a cave:
  the mind.
Those who restrain it:
  from Mara's bonds
  they'll be freed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
34 Like a fish that has been landed,
From the water drawn and stranded,
So this mind does shake and strain
In breaking free of Mara’s reign.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 34 As a fish taken from his watery home and thrown on dry ground, our thought trembles all over in order to escape the dominion of Mara (the tempter).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 34
Like a fish, thrown from all abodes on a dry ground
this mind trembles in order to leave Mara's realm. [DLMBSFn-V034]
Dhammapada Dhp. 035
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
35. Dunniggahassa lahuno1 yatthakāmanipātino
Cittassa damatho sādhu cittaṃ dantaṃ sukhāvahaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
35. Dunniggahassa lahuno, yatthakāmanipātino;
Cittassa damatho sādhu, cittaṃ dantaṃ sukhāvahaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

CONTROL YOUR MIND

  1. The mind is hard to check, swift, flits wherever it listeth: to control it is good. A controlled mind is conducive to happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Wonderful, indeed, it is to subdue the mind, so difficult to subdue, ever swift, and seizing whatever it desires. A tamed mind brings happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

33-37

Quivering, wavering,
hard to guard,
to hold in check:
  the mind.
The sage makes it straight —
like a fletcher,
the shaft of an arrow.

Like a fish
pulled from its home in the water
& thrown on land:
this mind flips & flaps about
  to escape Mara's sway.

Hard to hold down,
  nimble,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
Its taming is good.
The mind well-tamed
  brings ease.

So hard to see,
so very, very subtle,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
The wise should guard it.
The mind protected
  brings ease.

Wandering far,
going alone,
bodiless,
lying in a cave:
  the mind.
Those who restrain it:
  from Mara's bonds
  they'll be freed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
35 Hard to control is this mind, and so changeable,
Darting at what it conceives as delectable.
Mastering the mind is supremely commendable;
Mastered, it kindles a joy that’s ineffable.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 35 It is good to tame the mind, which is difficult to hold in and flighty, rushing wherever it listeth; a tamed mind brings happiness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 35
Good is the taming of the mind, which is difficult to restrain, quick,
jumping at whatever it desires. Restrained mind brings happiness. [DLMBSFn-V035]
Dhammapada Dhp. 036
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
36. Sududdasaṃ sunipunaṃ yatthakāmanipātinaṃ
Cittaṃ rakkhetha medhāvī cittaṃ guttaṃ sukhāvahaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
36. Sududdasaṃ sunipuṇaṃ, yatthakāmanipātinaṃ;
Cittaṃ rakkhetha medhāvī, cittaṃ guttaṃ sukhāvahaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GUARD YOUR THOUGHTS

  1. The mind is very hard to perceive, extremely subtle, flits wherever it listeth. Let the wise person guard it; a guarded mind is conducive to happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Let the discerning man guard the mind, so difficult to detect and extremely subtle, seizing whatever it desires. A guarded mind brings happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

33-37

Quivering, wavering,
hard to guard,
to hold in check:
  the mind.
The sage makes it straight —
like a fletcher,
the shaft of an arrow.

Like a fish
pulled from its home in the water
& thrown on land:
this mind flips & flaps about
  to escape Mara's sway.

Hard to hold down,
  nimble,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
Its taming is good.
The mind well-tamed
  brings ease.

So hard to see,
so very, very subtle,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
The wise should guard it.
The mind protected
  brings ease.

Wandering far,
going alone,
bodiless,
lying in a cave:
  the mind.
Those who restrain it:
  from Mara's bonds
  they'll be freed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
36 The mind is very subtle and difficult to see. It descends on whatever it finds pleasant. A wise person should protect the mind: a protected mind brings happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 36 Let the wise man guard his thoughts, for they are difficult to perceive, very artful, and they rush wherever they list: thoughts well guarded bring happiness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 36
O Wise Ones, you should protect the mind, which is very difficult to see, very subtle
and jumping at whatever it desires. Protected mind brings happiness. [DLMBSFn-V036]
Dhammapada Dhp. 037
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
37. Dūraṅgamaṃ ekacaraṃ asarīraṃ kuhāsayaṃ
Ye cittaṃ saññamessanti mokkhanti mārabandhanā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
37. Dūraṅgamaṃ ekacaraṃ [ekacāraṃ (ka.)], asarīraṃ guhāsayaṃ;
Ye cittaṃ saṃyamessanti, mokkhanti mārabandhanā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

FREE ARE THEY WHO HAVE CONTROLLED THEIR MINDS

  1. Faring far, wandering alone, [NāradaFn03-03] bodiless, [NāradaFn03-04] lying in a cave, [NāradaFn03-05] is the mind. Those who subdue it are freed from the bond of Māra.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Dwelling in the cave (of the heart), the mind, without form, wanders far and alone. Those who subdue this mind are liberated from the bonds of Mara.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

33-37 [ThaniSFn-V37]

Quivering, wavering,
hard to guard,
to hold in check:
  the mind.
The sage makes it straight —
like a fletcher,
the shaft of an arrow.

Like a fish
pulled from its home in the water
& thrown on land:
this mind flips & flaps about
  to escape Mara's sway.

Hard to hold down,
  nimble,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
Its taming is good.
The mind well-tamed
  brings ease.

So hard to see,
so very, very subtle,
alighting wherever it likes:
  the mind.
The wise should guard it.
The mind protected
  brings ease.

Wandering far,
going alone,
bodiless,
lying in a cave:
  the mind.
Those who restrain it:
  from Mara's bonds
  they'll be freed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
37 How far the mind roams!
It wanders alone;
No body it owns;
Concealed is its home.
Once training it’s known,
From death’s bonds have you flown.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 37 Those who bridle their mind which travels far, moves about alone, is without a body, and hides in the chamber (of the heart), will be free from the bonds of Mara (the tempter).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 37
Those, who can restrain the mind, which is going far, wandering alone, bodiless
and living in the cave, those will be freed from the bond of Mara. [DLMBSFn-V037]
Dhammapada Dhp. 038
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
38. Anavaṭṭhitacittassa saddhammaṃ avijānato
Paripalavapasādassa paññā na paripūrati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
38. Anavaṭṭhitacittassa, saddhammaṃ avijānato;
Pariplavapasādassa, paññā na paripūrati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

TO THE VIGILANT THERE IS NO FEAR

  1. He whose mind is not steadfast, he who knows not the true doctrine, he whose confidence wavers - the wisdom [NāradaFn03-06] of such a one will never be perfect.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Wisdom never becomes perfect in one whose mind is not steadfast, who knows not the Good Teaching and whose faith wavers.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

38

For a person of unsteady mind,
not knowing true Dhamma,
  serenity
  set        adrift:
discernment doesn't grow full.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
38 In one who is
of unsteady mind,
ignorant of Dhamma,
of wavering faith,
wisdom does not mature.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 38 If a man's thoughts are unsteady, if he does not know the true law, if his peace of mind is troubled, his knowledge will never be perfect.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 38
The wisdom of a person, whose mind is unsteady, who does not understand the True Dharma and whose confidence is wavering will not become perfect. [DLMBSFn-V038]
Dhammapada Dhp. 039
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
39. Anavassutacittassa ananavāhatacetaso
Puññapāpapahīṇassa natthi jāgarato bhayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
39. Anavassutacittassa, ananvāhatacetaso;
Puññapāpapahīnassa, natthi jāgarato bhayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. He whose mind is not soaked (by lust) he who is not affected (by hatred), he who has transcended both good and evil [NāradaFn03-07] - for such a vigilant [NāradaFn03-08] one there is no fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. There is no fear for an awakened one, whose mind is not sodden (by lust) nor afflicted (by hate), and who has gone beyond both merit and demerit. [BudRkFn-v39]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

39 [ThaniSFn-V39]

For a person of unsoddened mind,
         unassaulted
awareness,
abandoning merit & evil,
  wakeful,
there is no danger
     no fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
39 For one whose mind is not flooded by lust, and not plagued by doubt; for one who has given up both merit and evil; for him, watchful and vigilant, there are no fears.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 39 If a man's thoughts are not dissipated, if his mind is not perplexed, if he has ceased to think of good or evil, then there is no fear for him while he is watchful.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 39
There is no fear for a person, whose mind is free of passions and not perplexed,
who has abandoned the idea of "good" and "bad" and who is watchful. [DLMBSFn-V039]
Dhammapada Dhp. 040
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
40. Kumbhūpamaṃ kāyamimaṃ viditvā nagarūpamaṃ cittamidaṃ ṭhapetvā
Yodhetha māraṃ paññāyudhena jitañca rakkhe anivesano siyā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
40. Kumbhūpamaṃ kāyamimaṃ viditvā, nagarūpamaṃ cittamidaṃ ṭhapetvā;
Yodhetha māraṃ paññāvudhena, jitañca rakkhe anivesano siyā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

FORTIFY YOUR MIND AND BE NON-ATTACHED

  1. Realizing that this body is (as fragile) as a jar, establishing this mind (as firm) as a (fortified) city he should attack Māra [NāradaFn03-09] with the weapon of wisdom. He should guard his conquest [NāradaFn03-10] and be without attachment. [NāradaFn03-11]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Realizing that this body is as fragile as a clay pot, and fortifying this mind like a well-fortified city, fight out Mara with the sword of wisdom. Then, guarding the conquest, remain unattached.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

40 [ThaniSFn-V40]

Knowing this body
  is like a clay jar,
securing this mind
  like a fort,
     attack Mara
  with the spear of discernment,
then guard what's won
  without settling there,
  without laying claim.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
40 Having realised this body’s like a pitcher - it’s as breakable -
And stabilised your mind until it’s stable as a citadel,
Then, using wisdom’s weapons, you should battle with the Evil One.
Your victory then defending, any yearnings you should overcome.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 40 Knowing that this body is (fragile) like a jar, and making this thought firm like a fortress, one should attack Mara (the tempter) with the weapon of knowledge, one should watch him when conquered, and should never rest.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 40
Having understood this body to be like a jar,
having established this mind like a city,
attack Mara with the weapon of wisdom,
you should protect the conquered territory and be without attachments. [DLMBSFn-V040]
Dhammapada Dhp. 041
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
41. Aciraṃ vatayaṃ kāyo paṭhaviṃ adhisessati
Chuddho apetaviññāṇo niratthaṃ'va kaliṅgaraṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
41. Aciraṃ vatayaṃ kāyo, pathaviṃ adhisessati;
Chuddho apetaviññāṇo, niratthaṃva kaliṅgaraṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Before long, alas! this body will lie upon the ground, cast aside, devoid of consciousness, even as a useless charred log. [NāradaFn03-12]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Ere long, alas! this body will lie upon the earth, unheeded and lifeless, like a useless log.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

41

All too soon, this body
will lie on the ground
  cast off,
bereft of consciousness,
like a useless scrap
  of wood.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
41 Not long, indeed, till it will rest,
This body here, beneath the clod -
Discarded, void of consciousness,
As useless as a rotten log.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 41 Before long, alas! this body will lie on the earth, despised, without understanding, like a useless log.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 41
Alas! Before long will this body lay upon the ground,
rejected, devoid of consciousness, like a worthless log. [DLMBSFn-V041]
Dhammapada Dhp. 042
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
42. Diso disaṃ yantaṃ kayirā verī vā pana verinaṃ
Micchāpaṇihitaṃ cittaṃ pāpiyo naṃ tato kare.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
42. Diso disaṃ yaṃ taṃ kayirā, verī vā pana verinaṃ;
Micchāpaṇihitaṃ cittaṃ, pāpiyo [pāpiyaṃ (?)] naṃ tato kare.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

AN ILL-DISPOSED MIND IS THE GREATEST ENEMY

  1. Whatever (harm) a foe may do to a foe, or a hater to a hater, an ill-directed mind [NāradaFn03-13] can do one far greater (harm).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Whatever harm an enemy may do to an enemy, or a hater to a hater, an ill-directed mind inflicts on oneself a greater harm.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

42-43 [ThaniSFn-V42]

Whatever an enemy might do
to an enemy,
or a foe to a foe,
the ill-directed mind
can do to you
  even worse.

Whatever a mother, father
or other kinsman
might do for you,
the well-directed mind
can do for you
  even better.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
42 Whatever aggressors might do to aggressors,
Or haters to men they despise,
We do harm to ourselves that’s immeasureably greater
With mind, if it's wrongly inclined.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 42 Whatever a hater may do to a hater, or an enemy to an enemy, a wrongly-directed mind will do us greater mischief.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 42
Whatever an enemy might do to an enemy, or a hater to a hated one,
wrongly directed mind can do one even worse (evil). [DLMBSFn-V042]
Dhammapada Dhp. 043
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
43. Na taṃ mātā pitā kayirā aññe vā pi ca ñātakā
Sammāpaṇihitaṃ cittaṃ seyyaso naṃ tato kare.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
43. Na taṃ mātā pitā kayirā, aññe vāpi ca ñātakā;
Sammāpaṇihitaṃ cittaṃ, seyyaso naṃ tato kare.

Cittavaggo tatiyo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A WELL-DIRECTED MIND IS FAR GREATER THAN EVEN A MOTHER OR A FATHER

  1. What neither mother, nor father, nor any other relative can do, a well-directed mind [NāradaFn03-14] does and thereby elevates one.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]
  1. Neither mother, father, nor any other relative can do one greater good than one's own well-directed mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

42-43

Whatever an enemy might do
to an enemy,
or a foe to a foe,
the ill-directed mind
can do to you
  even worse.

Whatever a mother, father
or other kinsman
might do for you,
the well-directed mind
can do for you
  even better.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
43 What mother or father or kindred can’t do,
A mind well-directed could do it for you.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 43 Not a mother, not a father will do so much, nor any other relative; a well-directed mind will do us greater service.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 43
What a mother, father or even other relatives can not do,
a well directed mind can do even far better than that. [DLMBSFn-V043]
Dhammapada Dhp. 044
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Pupphavaggo.
44. Ko imaṃ paṭhaviṃ vicessati
Yamalokañca imaṃ sadevakaṃ
Ko dhammapadaṃ sudesitaṃ
Kusalo pupphamiva pacessati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

4. Pupphavaggo

44. Ko imaṃ [komaṃ (ka.)] pathaviṃ vicessati [vijessati (sī. syā. pī.)], yamalokañca imaṃ sadevakaṃ;
Ko dhammapadaṃ sudesitaṃ, kusalo pupphamiva pacessati [pupphamivappacessati (ka.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 4 Flowers

THE NOBLE DISCIPLE WILL CONQUER THIS SELF

  1. Who will comprehend [NāradaFn04-01] this earth (self [NāradaFn04-02] ), and this realm of Yama, [NāradaFn04-03] and this world [NāradaFn04-04] together with the devas? [NāradaFn04-05] Who will investigate the well taught Path of Virtue [NāradaFn04-06] , even as an expert (garland maker) will pick flowers?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp IV Flowers

44. Who shall overcome this earth, this realm of Yama and this sphere of men and gods? Who shall bring to perfection the well-taught path of wisdom as an expert garland-maker would his floral design?

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp IV Blossoms

44-45 [ThaniSFn-V44-45]

Who will penetrate this earth
& this realm of death
with all its gods?
Who will ferret out
the well-taught Dhamma-saying,
as the skillful flower-arranger
  the flower?

The learner-on-the-path
will penetrate this earth
& this realm of death
with all its gods.
The learner-on-the-path
will ferret out
the well-taught Dhamma-saying,
as the skillful flower-arranger
  the flower.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

4. Flowers

44 & 45 Which person will master this world of humanity,
Here, with its gods, in this realm of mortality?
Which person will pick out the path of the Dhamma,
Like one who was clever, a fine rose might garner?

The sekha [VaradoFn04-1] will master this world of humanity,
Here, with its gods, in this realm of mortality.
The sekha will pick out the path of the Dhamma,
Like one who was clever, a fine rose might garner.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter IV: Flowers

44 Who shall overcome this earth, and the world of Yama (the lord of the departed), and the world of the gods? Who shall find out the plainly shown path of virtue, as a clever man finds out the (right) flower?

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 4: The Flower

DhP 44
Who will investigate this earth and this Yama's world with its deities?
Who will understand this well taught Dharma-verse, as a skilful person picks flowers? [DLMBSFn-V044]
Dhammapada Dhp. 045
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
45. Sekho paṭhaviṃ vicessati
Yamalokañca imaṃ sadevakaṃ
Sekho dhammapadaṃ sudesitaṃ
Kusalo pupphamiva pacessati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
45. Sekho pathaviṃ vicessati, yamalokañca imaṃ sadevakaṃ;
Sekho dhammapadaṃ sudesitaṃ, kusalo pupphamiva pacessati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. A disciple in training (sekha [NāradaFn04-07] ), will comprehend this earth, and this realm of Yama together with the realm of the devas. A disciple in training will investigate the well-taught Path of Virtue even as an expert (garland-maker) will pick flowers.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 45. A striver-on-the path shall overcome this earth, this realm of Yama and this sphere of men and gods. The striver-on-the-path shall bring to perfection the well-taught path of wisdom, as an expert garland-maker would his floral design. [BudRkFn-v45]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

44-45 [ThaniSFn-V44-45]

Who will penetrate this earth
& this realm of death
with all its gods?
Who will ferret out
the well-taught Dhamma-saying,
as the skillful flower-arranger
  the flower?

The learner-on-the-path
will penetrate this earth
& this realm of death
with all its gods.
The learner-on-the-path
will ferret out
the well-taught Dhamma-saying,
as the skillful flower-arranger
  the flower.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
44&45 Which person will master this world of humanity,
Here, with its gods, in this realm of mortality?
Which person will pick out the path of the Dhamma,
Like one who was clever, a fine rose might garner?

The sekha [VaradoFn04-1] will master this world of humanity,
Here, with its gods, in this realm of mortality.
The sekha will pick out the path of the Dhamma,
Like one who was clever, a fine rose might garner.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 45 The disciple will overcome the earth, and the world of Yama, and the world of the gods. The disciple will find out the plainly shown path of virtue, as a clever man finds out the (right) flower.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 45
A disciple will investigate the earth and this Yama's world with its deities.
A disciple will understand this well taught Dharma-verse, as a skilful person picks flowers. [DLMBSFn-V045]
Dhammapada Dhp. 046
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
46. Pheṇūpamaṃ kāyamimaṃ viditvā
Marīcidhammaṃ abhisambudhāno
Chetvāna mārassa papupphakāni[b]
Adassanaṃ maccurājassa gacche.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
46. Pheṇūpamaṃ kāyamimaṃ viditvā, marīcidhammaṃ abhisambudhāno;
Chetvāna mārassa papupphakāni [sapupphakāni (ṭīkā)], adassanaṃ maccurājassa gacche.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LIKE A MIRAGE IS THIS BODY

  1. Knowing that this body is like foam, [NāradaFn04-08] and comprehending its mirage-nature, [NāradaFn04-09] one should destroy the flower-shafts of sensual passions (Māra), and pass beyond the sight of the king of death. [NāradaFn04-10]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 46. Realizing that this body is like froth, penetrating its mirage-like nature, and plucking out Mara's flower-tipped arrows of sensuality, go beyond sight of the King of Death!
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

46

Knowing this body
is like foam,
realizing its nature
  — a mirage —
cutting out
the blossoms of Mara,
you go where the King of Death
  can't see.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
46 When you see that this body’s like foam,
As mirage-like its nature you know,
You’ll extract the love-arrows of Mara’s delight,
And you’ll make your escape from the King of Death’s sight.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 46 He who knows that this body is like froth, and has learnt that it is as unsubstantial as a mirage, will break the flower-pointed arrow of Mara, and never see the king of death.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 46
Having understood that this body is like foam, having realized its mirage-like nature,
having cut off Mara's flower-tipped arrows, one should make himself invisible to the King of Death. [DLMBSFn-V046]
Dhammapada Dhp. 047
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
47. Pupphāni heva pacinantaṃ byāsattamanasaṃ naraṃ
Suttaṃ gāmaṃ mahogho'va maccu ādāya gacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
47. Pupphāni heva pacinantaṃ, byāsattamanasaṃ [byāsattamānasaṃ (ka.)] naraṃ;
Suttaṃ gāmaṃ mahoghova, maccu ādāya gacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DEATH TAKES THE SENSUAL UNAWARES

  1. The man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasure), whose mind is distracted, death carries off as a great flood sweeps away a sleeping village.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 47. As a mighty flood sweeps away the sleeping village, so death carries away the person of distracted mind who only plucks the flowers (of pleasure).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

47-48

The man immersed in
gathering blossoms,
his heart distracted:
death sweeps him away —
  as a great flood,
  a village asleep.

The man immersed in
gathering blossoms,
his heart distracted,
insatiable in sensual pleasures:
the End-Maker holds him
under his sway.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
47 They who gather flowers of pleasure,
Minds attached to sensual treasure,
Death will sweep those rakes away,
Like sea a sleeping town might slay.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 47 Death carries off a man who is gathering flowers and whose mind is distracted, as a flood carries off a sleeping village.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 47
The man who is only gathering flowers, with an attached mind,
the death will carry away, like a great flood the sleeping village. [DLMBSFn-V047]
Dhammapada Dhp. 048
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
48. Pupphāni heva pacinantaṃ byāsattamanasaṃ naraṃ
Atittaṃ yeva kāmesu antako kurute vasaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
48. Pupphāni heva pacinantaṃ, byāsattamanasaṃ naraṃ;
Atittaññeva kāmesu, antako kurute vasaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

WITH UNGRATIFIED DESIRES THE SENSUAL DIE

  1. The man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasure), whose mind is distracted, and who is insatiate in desires, the Destroyer [NāradaFn04-11] brings under his sway.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 48. The Destroyer brings under his sway the person of distracted mind who, insatiate in sense desires, only plucks the flowers (of pleasure).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

47-48 [ThaniSFn-V48]

The man immersed in
gathering blossoms,
his heart distracted:
death sweeps him away —
  as a great flood,
  a village asleep.

The man immersed in
gathering blossoms,
his heart distracted,
insatiable in sensual pleasures:
the End-Maker holds him
under his sway.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
48 On they who gather flowers of pleasure,
Minds attached to sensual treasure,
Ever seeking earthy novelty,
Death imposes its authority.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 48 Death subdues a man who is gathering flowers, and whose mind is distracted, before he is satiated in his pleasures.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 48
The man who is only gathering flowers, with an attached mind,
unsatisfied in sense pleasures, Death gets under control. [DLMBSFn-V048]
Dhammapada Dhp. 049
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
49. Yathāpi bhamaro pupphaṃ vaṇṇagandhaṃ aheṭhayaṃ
Paḷeti rasamādāya evaṃ gāme munī care.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
49. Yathāpi bhamaro pupphaṃ, vaṇṇagandhamaheṭhayaṃ [vaṇṇagandhamapoṭhayaṃ (ka.)];
Paleti rasamādāya, evaṃ gāme munī care.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SAINTLY MONKS CAUSE NO INCONVENIENCE TO ANY

  1. As a bee without harming the flower, its colour or scent, flies away, collecting only the honey, even so should the sage wander in the village. [NāradaFn04-12]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 49. As a bee gathers honey from the flower without injuring its color or fragrance, even so the sage goes on his alms-round in the village. [BudRkFn-v49]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

49

As a bee — without harming
  the blossom,
  its color,
  its fragrance —
takes its nectar & flies away:
so should the sage
go through a village.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
49 Whenever a bumble-bee visits a flower,
Going in order to nectar devour,
Never the colour or fragrance it harms:
The sage should act likewise when walking for alms.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 49 As the bee collects nectar and departs without injuring the flower, or its colour or scent, so let a sage dwell in his village.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 49
Just like a bee leaves the flower, not hurting the color and smell,
having taken its juice, so should a wise man walk through the village. [DLMBSFn-V049]
Dhammapada Dhp. 050
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
50. Na paresaṃ vilomāni na paresaṃ katākataṃ
Attano'va avekkheyya katāni akatāni ca.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
50. Na paresaṃ vilomāni, na paresaṃ katākataṃ;
Attanova avekkheyya, katāni akatāni ca.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SEEK NOT OTHERS' FAULTS BUT YOUR OWN

  1. Let not one seek others' faults, things left done and undone by others, but one's own deeds done and undone.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 50. Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one's own acts, done and undone.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

50

Focus,
not on the rudenesses of others,
not on what they've done
  or left undone,
but on what you
have & haven't done
  yourself.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
50 Don’t try and seek out another’s iniquity;
Of deeds and neglects of theirs, lose curiosity.
Better consider your own impropriety:
Omissions, commissions, of moral impurity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 50 Not the perversities of others, not their sins of commission or omission, but his own misdeeds and negligences should a sage take notice of.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 50
One should not look at others' wrong deeds, what the others have done or not.
One should look only at what one oneself has and has not done. [DLMBSFn-V050]
Dhammapada Dhp. 051
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
51. Yathāpi ruciraṃ pupphaṃ vaṇṇavantaṃ agandhakaṃ
Evaṃ subhāsitā vācā aphalā hoti akubbato.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
51. Yathāpi ruciraṃ pupphaṃ, vaṇṇavantaṃ agandhakaṃ;
Evaṃ subhāsitā vācā, aphalā hoti akubbato.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

PRACTICE IS BETTER THAN MERE TEACHING

  1. As a flower that is lovely and beautiful but is scentless, even so fruitless is the well-spoken word of one who does not practise it.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 51. Like a beautiful flower full of color but without fragrance, even so, fruitless are the fair words of one who does not practice them.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

51-52

Just like a blossom,
bright colored
  but scentless:
a well-spoken word
  is fruitless
when not carried out.

Just like a blossom,
bright colored
  & full of scent:
a well-spoken word
  is fruitful
when well carried out.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
51 One’s well-spoken Dhamma is empty of fruit
If one’s practice does not one’s own words follow suit.
Just like a flower that is coloured so well:
It is splendid to look at, but no lovely smell.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 51 Like a beautiful flower, full of colour, but without scent, are the fine but fruitless words of him who does not act accordingly.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 51
Just like a beautiful flower, colorful but without smell,
is a well said speech of somebody, who does not act accordingly. [DLMBSFn-V051]
Dhammapada Dhp. 052
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
52. Yathāpi ruciraṃ pupphaṃ vaṇṇavantaṃ sagandhakaṃ
Evaṃ subhāsitā vācā saphalā hoti pakubbato.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
52. Yathāpi ruciraṃ pupphaṃ, vaṇṇavantaṃ sugandhakaṃ [sagandhakaṃ (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)];
Evaṃ subhāsitā vācā, saphalā hoti kubbato [sakubbato (sī. pī.), pakubbato (sī. aṭṭha.), sukubbato (syā. kaṃ.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. As a flower that is lovely, beautiful, and scent-laden, even so fruitful is the well-spoken word of one who practises it.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 52. Like a beautiful flower full of color and also fragrant, even so, fruitful are the fair words of one who practices them.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

51-52

Just like a blossom,
bright colored
  but scentless:
a well-spoken word
  is fruitless
when not carried out.

Just like a blossom,
bright colored
  & full of scent:
a well-spoken word
  is fruitful
when well carried out.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
52 One’s well-spoken Dhamma is bursting with fruit
If one’s practice, indeed, one’s own words follows suit.
Just like a flower that is coloured so well,
Which is dazzling to look at, and fragrant as well.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 52 But, like a beautiful flower, full of colour and full of scent, are the fine and fruitful words of him who acts accordingly.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 52
Just like a beautiful flower, colorful and with smell,
is a well said speech of somebody, who does act accordingly. [DLMBSFn-V052]
Dhammapada Dhp. 053
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
53. Yathāpi ppupharāsimhā kayirā mālākuṇe bahū
Evaṃ jātena maccena kattabbaṃ kusalaṃ bahuṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
53. Yathāpi puppharāsimhā, kayirā mālāguṇe bahū;
Evaṃ jātena maccena, kattabbaṃ kusalaṃ bahuṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DO MUCH GOOD

  1. As from a heap of flowers many a garland is made, even so many good deeds should be done by one born a mortal.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 53. As from a great heap of flowers many garlands can be made, even so should many good deeds be done by one born a mortal.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

53 [ThaniSFn-V53]

Just as from a heap of flowers
many garland strands can be made,
  even so
one born & mortal
  should do
 — with what's born & is mortal —
  many a skillful thing.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
53 From a mass of flowers profuse,
Many garlands are produced:
So when mortals are conceived,
They much goodness can achieve.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 53 As many kinds of wreaths can be made from a heap of flowers, so many good things may be achieved by a mortal when once he is born.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 53
Just as from the heap of flowers one can do a lot of garlands,
so a born mortal should do a lot of meritorious deeds. [DLMBSFn-V053]
Dhammapada Dhp. 054
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
54. Na pupphagandho paṭivātameti na candanaṃ tagaramallikā vā
Satañca gandho paṭivātameti sabbā disā sappuriso pavāti.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
54. Na pupphagandho paṭivātameti, na candanaṃ tagaramallikā [tagaramallikā (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)];
Satañca gandho paṭivātameti, sabbā disā sappuriso pavāyati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

MORAL FRAGRANCE WAFTS EVERYWHERE

  1. The perfume of flowers blows not against the wind, nor does the fragrance of sandalwood, tagara [NāradaFn04-13] and jasmine but the fragrance of the virtuous blows against the wind; the virtuous man pervades every direction.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 54. Not the sweet smell of flowers, not even the fragrance of sandal, tagara, or jasmine blows against the wind. But the fragrance of the virtuous blows against the wind. Truly the virtuous man pervades all directions with the fragrance of his virtue. [BudRkFn-v54]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

54-56 [ThaniSFn-V54-56]

No flower's scent
goes against the wind —
  not sandalwood,
     jasmine,
     tagara.
But the scent of the good
does go against the wind.
The person of integrity
wafts a scent
in every direction.

Sandalwood, tagara,
lotus, & jasmine:
Among these scents,
the scent of virtue
is unsurpassed.

Next to nothing, this fragrance
 — sandalwood, tagara —
while the scent of the virtuous
wafts to the gods,
  supreme.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
54 Lavender, sandalwood, jasmine and lotus
Have perfumes that into a headwind don’t float.
But into the wind blows the scent of the true:
The folk who are good every quarter imbue.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 54 The scent of flowers does not travel against the wind, nor (that of) sandal-wood, or of Tagara and Mallika flowers; but the odour of good people travels even against the wind; a good man pervades every place.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 54
The scent of flowers, sandal, tagara or jasmine does not go against the wind.
The scent of true ones goes against the wind. The true person pervades all directions. [DLMBSFn-V054]
Dhammapada Dhp. 055
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
55. Candanaṃ tagaraṃ vāpi uppalaṃ atha vassikī
Etesaṃ gandhajātānaṃ sīlagandho anuttaro.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
55. Candanaṃ tagaraṃ vāpi, uppalaṃ atha vassikī;
Etesaṃ gandhajātānaṃ, sīlagandho anuttaro.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Sandalwood, tagara, lotus, jasmine: above all these kinds of fragrance, the perfume of virtue is by far the best.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 55. Of all the fragrances — sandal, tagara, blue lotus and jasmine — the fragrance of virtue is the sweetest.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

54-56 [ThaniSFn-V54-56]

No flower's scent
goes against the wind —
  not sandalwood,
     jasmine,
     tagara.
But the scent of the good
does go against the wind.
The person of integrity
wafts a scent
in every direction.

Sandalwood, tagara,
lotus, & jasmine:
Among these scents,
the scent of virtue
is unsurpassed.

Next to nothing, this fragrance
 — sandalwood, tagara —
while the scent of the virtuous
wafts to the gods,
  supreme.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
55 The fragrance of virtue surpasses that of sandalwood, lavender, lotus and jasmine.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 55 Sandal-wood or Tagara, a lotus-flower, or a Vassiki, among these sorts of perfumes, the perfume of virtue is unsurpassed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 55
Sandal or tagara, lotus and jasmine,
of these kinds of scent, the scent of the virtue is highest. [DLMBSFn-V055]
Dhammapada Dhp. 056
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
56. Appamatto ayaṃ gandho yāyaṃ tagaracandanī
Yo ca sīlavataṃ gandho vāti devesu uttamo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
56. Appamatto ayaṃ gandho, yvāyaṃ tagaracandanaṃ [yāyaṃ tagaracandanī (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)];
Yo ca sīlavataṃ gandho, vāti devesu uttamo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE SCENT OF VIRTUE IS BY FAR THE BEST

  1. Of little account is the fragrance of tagara or sandal; the fragrance of the virtuous, which blows even amongst the gods, is supreme.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 56. Faint is the fragrance of tagara and sandal, but excellent is the fragrance of the virtuous, wafting even amongst the gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

54-56 [ThaniSFn-V54-56]

No flower's scent
goes against the wind —
  not sandalwood,
     jasmine,
     tagara.
But the scent of the good
does go against the wind.
The person of integrity
wafts a scent
in every direction.

Sandalwood, tagara,
lotus, & jasmine:
Among these scents,
the scent of virtue
is unsurpassed.

Next to nothing, this fragrance
 — sandalwood, tagara —
while the scent of the virtuous
wafts to the gods,
  supreme.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
56 Lavender, sandal and lotus aromas
Can only be rated as second-rate odours.
The fragrance of virtue, of all, is most excellent:
Even the heavens are blessed by that scent.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 56 Mean is the scent that comes from Tagara and sandal-wood;--the perfume of those who possess virtue rises up to the gods as the highest.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 56
Very faint is this scent of tagara and sandal.
Highest is the scent of a virtuous one; it blows even amongst the gods. [DLMBSFn-V056]
Dhammapada Dhp. 057
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
57. Tesaṃ sampannasīlānaṃ appamādavihārinaṃ
Sammadaññā vimuttānaṃ māro maggaṃ na vindati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
57. Tesaṃ sampannasīlānaṃ, appamādavihārinaṃ;
Sammadaññā vimuttānaṃ, māro maggaṃ na vindati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

REBIRTH-CONSCIOUSNESS OF ARAHANTS CANNOT BE TRACED

  1. Māra [NāradaFn04-14] finds not the path of those who are virtuous, careful in living, and freed by right knowledge.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 57. Mara never finds the path of the truly virtuous, who abide in heedfulness and are freed by perfect knowledge.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

57 [ThaniSFn-V57]

Those consummate in virtue,
dwelling    in heedfulness,
released    through right knowing:
Mara can't follow their tracks.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
57 Mara cannot trace the path of those who are accomplished in virtue, who abide diligently, and who are freed through final knowledge.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 57 Of the people who possess these virtues, who live without thoughtlessness, and who are emancipated through true knowledge, Mara, the tempter, never finds the way.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 57
Mara doesn't find the way of those endowed with virtue,
living in conscientiousness and freed by the right knowledge. [DLMBSFn-V057]
Dhammapada Dhp. 058
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
58. Yathā saṅkāradhānasmiṃ ujjhitasmiṃ mahāpathe padumaṃ tattha jāyetha sucigandhaṃ manoramaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
58. Yathā saṅkāraṭhānasmiṃ [saṅkāradhānasmiṃ (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)], ujjhitasmiṃ mahāpathe;
Padumaṃ tattha jāyetha, sucigandhaṃ manoramaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GREATNESS MAY BE FOUND EVEN AMONGST THE BASEST THE WISE OUTSHINE WORLDLINGS

58-59. As upon a heap of rubbish thrown on the highway, a sweet-smelling lovely lotus may grow, even so amongst worthless beings, a disciple of the Fully Enlightened One outshines the blind worldlings in wisdom. [NāradaFn04-15]

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 58. Upon a heap of rubbish in the road-side ditch blooms a lotus, fragrant and pleasing.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

58-59

As in a pile of rubbish
cast by the side of a highway
  a lotus might grow
  clean-smelling
  pleasing the heart,
so in the midst of the rubbish-like,
people run-of-the-mill & blind,
  there dazzles with discernment
  the disciple of the Rightly
  Self-Awakened One.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
58&59 As upon a rubbish pit,
Its filth beside the road,
May there a fragrant lotus sit,
So bonny to behold.

And so with men, that rubbish pile
Of common beings blind,
Disciples of the Buddha dwell.
With wisdom’s light they shine.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 58, 59. As on a heap of rubbish cast upon the highway the lily will grow full of sweet perfume and delight, thus the disciple of the truly enlightened Buddha shines forth by his knowledge among those who are like rubbish, among the people that walk in darkness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 58
Just as at the rubbish heap, thrown out by the big road,
can grow a lotus, of pure smell and delightful, [DLMBSFn-V058]
Dhammapada Dhp. 059
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
59. Evaṃ saṅkārabhūtesu andhabhūte puthujjane
Atirocati paññāya sammāsambuddhasāvako.

Pupphavaggo catuttho.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
59. Evaṃ saṅkārabhūtesu, andhabhūte [andhībhūte (ka.)] puthujjane;
Atirocati paññāya, sammāsambuddhasāvako.

Pupphavaggo catuttho niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 58-59. As upon a heap of rubbish thrown on the highway, a sweet-smelling lovely lotus may grow, even so amongst worthless beings, a disciple of the Fully Enlightened One outshines the blind worldlings in wisdom. [NāradaFn04-15]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 59. Even so, on the rubbish heap of blinded mortals the disciple of the Supremely Enlightened One shines resplendent in wisdom.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

58-59

As in a pile of rubbish
cast by the side of a highway
  a lotus might grow
  clean-smelling
  pleasing the heart,
so in the midst of the rubbish-like,
people run-of-the-mill & blind,
  there dazzles with discernment
  the disciple of the Rightly
  Self-Awakened One.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
58&59 As upon a rubbish pit,
Its filth beside the road,
May there a fragrant lotus sit,
So bonny to behold.

And so with men, that rubbish pile
Of common beings blind,
Disciples of the Buddha dwell.
With wisdom’s light they shine.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 58, 59. As on a heap of rubbish cast upon the highway the lily will grow full of sweet perfume and delight, thus the disciple of the truly enlightened Buddha shines forth by his knowledge among those who are like rubbish, among the people that walk in darkness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 59
Thus, amidst the dust-like beings, amongst ignorant ordinary people,
The disciple of the truly and completely Awakened One magnificently shines with wisdom. [DLMBSFn-V059]
Dhammapada Dhp. 060
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Bālavaggo
60. Dīghā jāgarato ratti dīghaṃ santassa yojanaṃ
Dīgho bālānaṃ saṃsāro saddhamma avijānataṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

5. Bālavaggo

60. Dīghā jāgarato ratti, dīghaṃ santassa yojanaṃ;
Dīgho bālānaṃ saṃsāro, saddhammaṃ avijānataṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 5 Fools

LONG IS saṃsāra TO THOSE WHO KNOW NOT THE DHAMMA

  1. Long is the night to the wakeful; long is the league to the weary; long is saṃsāra [NāradaFn05-01] to the foolish who know not the Sublime Truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp V The Fool

60. Long is the night to the sleepless; long is the league to the weary. Long is worldly existence to fools who know not the Sublime Truth.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp V Fools

60

Long for the wakeful is the night.
Long for the weary, a league.
For fools
unaware of True Dhamma,
             samsara
is long.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 5 Fools

60
How long, indeed, a sleepless night;
How long a weary ten mile hike;
And, for the fool, how long samsara,
Failing to perceive true Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter V: The Fool

60 Long is the night to him who is awake; long is a mile to him who is tired; long is life to the foolish who do not know the true law.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 5: The Fool

DhP 60
Long is the night for a wakeful; long is a yojana for a tired.
Long is the Samsara for the fools who do not know the true Dharma. [DLMBSFn-V060]
Dhammapada Dhp. 061
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
61. Carañce nādhigaccheyya seyyaṃ sadisamattano
Ekacariyaṃ daḷhaṃ kayirā natthi bāle sahāyatā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
61. Carañce nādhigaccheyya, seyyaṃ sadisamattano;
Ekacariyaṃ [ekacariyaṃ (ka.)] daḷhaṃ kayirā, natthi bāle sahāyatā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

AVOID COMPANIONSHIP WITH THE FOOLISH

  1. If, as the disciple fares along, he meets no companion who is better or equal, let him firmly pursue his solitary career. There is no fellowship [NāradaFn05-02] with the foolish. [NāradaFn05-03]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 61. Should a seeker not find a companion who is better or equal, let him resolutely pursue a solitary course; there is no fellowship with the fool.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

61

If, in your course, you don't meet
your equal, your better,
then continue your course,
  firmly,
     alone.
There's no fellowship with fools.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
61
If a woman does not find
Her betters or her equals, she
Should fare alone, steadfast in mind:
With fools there is no company.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 61 If a traveller does not meet with one who is his better, or his equal, let him firmly keep to his solitary journey; there is no companionship with a fool.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 61
If a wanderer should not find a companion better or similar to oneself,
then he should resolutely wander alone. There is no companionship with a fool. [DLMBSFn-V061]
Dhammapada Dhp. 062
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
62. Puttā matthi dhanammatthi iti bālo vihaññati
Attā hi attano natthi kuto puttā kuto dhanaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
62. Puttā matthi dhanammatthi [puttamatthi dhanamatthi (ka.)], iti bālo vihaññati;
Attā hi [attāpi (?)] attano natthi, kuto puttā kuto dhanaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE IS NOT ONE'S OWN

  1. "Sons have I; wealth have I": Thus is the fool worried. Verily, he himself is not his own. Whence sons? Whence wealth?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 62. The fool worries, thinking, "I have sons, I have wealth." Indeed, when he himself is not his own, whence are sons, whence is wealth?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

62

'I have sons, I have wealth' —
the fool torments himself.
When even he himself
doesn't belong to himself,
  how then sons?
  How wealth?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
62
“I have sons!” “I have wealth!”
Thus the fool exalts herself.
She has not her very self,
Let alone her sons or wealth.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 62 "These sons belong to me, and this wealth belongs to me," with such thoughts a fool is tormented. He himself does not belong to himself; how much less sons and wealth?
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 62
The fool worries: "I have sons, I have wealth."
He does not even own himself. Whence sons and wealth? [DLMBSFn-V062]
Dhammapada Dhp. 063
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
63. Yo bālo maññati bālyaṃ paṇaḍito vā'pi tena so
Bālo ca paṇḍitamānī sa ve bālo'ti vuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
63. Yo bālo maññati bālyaṃ, paṇḍito vāpi tena so;
Bālo ca paṇḍitamānī, sa ve ‘‘bālo’’ti vuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

WISE IS HE WHO ACKNOWLEDGES HIS FOOLISHNESS

  1. The fool who knows that he is a fool is for that very reason a wise man; the fool who thinks that he is wise is called a fool indeed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 63. A fool who knows his foolishness is wise at least to that extent, but a fool who thinks himself wise is a fool indeed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

63

A fool with a sense of his foolishness
is — at least to that extent — wise.
But a fool who thinks himself wise
really deserves to be called
  a fool.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
63
The fool who does her folly see
Indeed’s a sage to that degree;
But who to wisdom gives false airs,
That fool indeed’s a fool declared.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 63 The fool who knows his foolishness, is wise at least so far. But a fool who thinks himself wise, he is called a fool indeed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 63
A fool who knows about his foolishness, just by that he is like a wise man.
And a fool, who is proud of his cleverness, he is indeed called a fool. [DLMBSFn-V063]
Dhammapada Dhp. 064
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
64. Yāvajīvampi ce bālo vaṇḍitaṃ payirupāsati
Na so dhammaṃ vijānāti dabbī sūparasaṃ yathā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
64. Yāvajīvampi ce bālo, paṇḍitaṃ payirupāsati;
Na so dhammaṃ vijānāti, dabbī sūparasaṃ yathā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A FOOL CANNOT APPRECIATE THE VALUE OF THE DHAMMA

  1. Though a fool, through all his life, associates with a wise man, he no more understands the Dhamma than a spoon (tastes) the flavour of soup.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 64. Though all his life a fool associates with a wise man, he no more comprehends the Truth than a spoon tastes the flavor of the soup.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

64-65

Even if for a lifetime
the fool stays with the wise,
he knows nothing of the Dhamma —
  as the ladle,
  the taste of the soup.

Even if for a moment,
the perceptive person stays with the wise,
he immediately knows the Dhamma —
  as the tongue,
  the taste of the soup.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
64
Although a fool might well engage
All his lifetime with a sage,
He’ll the Dhamma no more savour
Than the spoon the curry’s flavour.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 64 If a fool be associated with a wise man even all his life, he will perceive the truth as little as a spoon perceives the taste of soup.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 64
A fool can attend on a wise man even for whole his life,
he will not understand the Dharma, like a spoon does not know the taste of the soup. [DLMBSFn-V064]
Dhammapada Dhp. 065
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
65. Muhuttampi ce viñgñu paṇḍitaṃ payirupāsati
Khippaṃ dhammaṃ vijānāti jivhā sūparasaṃ yathā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
65. Muhuttamapi ce viññū, paṇḍitaṃ payirupāsati;
Khippaṃ dhammaṃ vijānāti, jivhā sūparasaṃ yathā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE WISE CAN APPRECIATE THE VALUE OF THE DHAMMA

  1. Though an intelligent person, associates with a wise man for only a moment, he quickly understands the Dhamma as the tongue (tastes) the flavour of soup.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 65. Though only for a moment a discerning person associates with a wise man, quickly he comprehends the Truth, just as the tongue tastes the flavor of the soup.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

64-65

Even if for a lifetime
the fool stays with the wise,
he knows nothing of the Dhamma —
  as the ladle,
  the taste of the soup.

Even if for a moment,
the perceptive person stays with the wise,
he immediately knows the Dhamma —
  as the tongue,
  the taste of the soup.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
65
Although the prudent might engage
But a moment with a sage,
Still, he’ll Dhamma quickly savour,
As the tongue the curry’s flavour.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 65 If an intelligent man be associated for one minute only with a wise man, he will soon perceive the truth, as the tongue perceives the taste of soup.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 65
An intelligent person can attend on a wise man even for a second,
he will quickly understand the Dharma, like a tongue knows the taste of the soup. [DLMBSFn-V065]
Dhammapada Dhp. 066
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
66. Caranti bālā dummedhā amitteneva attanā
Karontā pāpakaṃ kammaṃ yaṃ hoti kaṭukapphalaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
67. Na taṃ kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu, yaṃ katvā anutappati;
Yassa assumukho rodaṃ, vipākaṃ paṭisevati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BITTER IS THE FRUIT OF EVIL

  1. Fools of little wit move about with the very self as their own foe, doing evil deeds the fruit of which is bitter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 66. Fools of little wit are enemies unto themselves as they move about doing evil deeds, the fruits of which are bitter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

66

Fools, their wisdom weak,
are their own enemies
as they go through life,
doing evil
that bears
      bitter fruit.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
66
The fool of little wit proceeds
Undertaking evil deeds,
Acting as her own ill-wisher,
Reaping fruit profusely bitter.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 66 Fools of little understanding have themselves for their greatest enemies, for they do evil deeds which must bear bitter fruits.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 66
The stupid fools behave as if they themselves were their enemies,
doing bad deeds, which have bitter fruit. [DLMBSFn-V066]
Dhammapada Dhp. 067
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
67. Na taṃ kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu yaṃ katvā nānutappati
Yassa assumukho rodaṃ vipākaṃ paṭisevati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
67. Na taṃ kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu, yaṃ katvā anutappati;
Yassa assumukho rodaṃ, vipākaṃ paṭisevati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NOT WELL DONE IS THAT DEED WHICH CAUSES REPENTANCE

  1. That deed is not well done when, after having done it, one repents, and when weeping, with tearful face, one reaps the fruit thereof.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 67. Ill done is that action of doing which one repents later, and the fruit of which one, weeping, reaps with tears.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

67-68

It's not good,
the doing of the deed
that, once it's done,
you regret,
whose result you reap crying,
your face in tears.

It's good,
the doing of the deed
that, once it's done,
you don't regret,
whose result you reap gratified,
    happy at heart.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
67
Acts and deeds are not propitious,
Acts which done, she lives to rue;
Which lead to tears and lamentation
When the kammic fruits ensue.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 67 That deed is not well done of which a man must repent, and the reward of which he receives crying and with a tearful face.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 67
That deed is not well done, which one regrets when it is accomplished,
whose consequences one faces with a tearful face and crying. [DLMBSFn-V067]
Dhammapada Dhp. 068
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
68. Tañca kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu yaṃ katvā nānutappati
Yassa patīto sumano vipākaṃ paṭisevati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
68. Tañca kammaṃ kataṃ sādhu, yaṃ katvā nānutappati;
Yassa patīto sumano, vipākaṃ paṭisevati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

WELL DONE IS THAT DEED WHICH CAUSES NO REPENTANCE

  1. That deed is well done when, after having done it, one repents not, and when, with joy and pleasure, one reaps the fruit thereof.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 68. Well done is that action of doing which one repents not later, and the fruit of which one reaps with delight and happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

67-68

It's not good,
the doing of the deed
that, once it's done,
you regret,
whose result you reap crying,
your face in tears.

It's good,
the doing of the deed
that, once it's done,
you don't regret,
whose result you reap gratified,
    happy at heart.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
68
Deeds and actions are propitious,
If when done, she rests appeased,
Which lead to happy satisfaction
With the kammic fruits received.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 68 No, that deed is well done of which a man does not repent, and the reward of which he receives gladly and cheerfully.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 68
That deed is well done, which one does not regret when it is accomplished,
whose consequences one faces delighted and happy. [DLMBSFn-V068]
Dhammapada Dhp. 069
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
69. Madhuvā maññati bālo yāva pāpaṃ na paccati
Yadā ca paccati pāpaṃ atha bālo dukkhaṃ nigacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
69. Madhuvā [madhuṃ vā (dī. ni. ṭīkā 1)] maññati bālo, yāva pāpaṃ na paccati;
Yadā ca paccati pāpaṃ, bālo [atha bālo (sī. syā.) atha (?)] dukkhaṃ nigacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

EVIL-DOERS COME TO GRIEF

  1. As sweet as honey is an evil deed, so thinks the fool so long as it ripens not; but when it ripens, then he comes to grief.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 69. So long as an evil deed has not ripened, the fool thinks it as sweet as honey. But when the evil deed ripens, the fool comes to grief.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

69

As long as evil has yet to ripen,
the fool mistakes it for honey.
But when that evil ripens,
the fool falls into
                  pain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
69
Like honey does the fool adore
Evil deeds that still are raw.
When those evil deeds are ripe,
Then the fool will sorrow strike. |
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 69 As long as the evil deed done does not bear fruit, the fool thinks it is like honey; but when it ripens, then the fool suffers grief.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 69
The fool thinks it is as honey, as long as the evil is not ripe.
When the evil is ripe, then he undergoes suffering. [DLMBSFn-V069]
Dhammapada Dhp. 070
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
70. Māse māse kusaggena bālo bhuñjetha bhojanaṃ
Na so saṅkhatadhammānaṃ kalaṃ agghati soḷasiṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
70. Māse māse kusaggena, bālo bhuñjeyya bhojanaṃ;
Na so saṅkhātadhammānaṃ [saṅkhatadhammānaṃ (sī. pī. ka.)], kalaṃ agghati soḷasiṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

REALIZATION IS FAR SUPERIOR TO MERE FASTING

  1. Month after month a fool may eat only as much food as can be picked up on the tip of a kusa grass blade; [NāradaFn05-05] but he is not worth a sixteenth part of them who have comprehended the Truth. [NāradaFn05-06]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 70. Month after month a fool may eat his food with the tip of a blade of grass, but he still is not worth a sixteenth part of the those who have comprehended the Truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

70

Month after month
the fool might eat
only a tip-of-grass measure of food,
but he wouldn't be worth
     one sixteenth
of those who've fathomed
the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
70
Though month after month, as a spoon for his nourishment,
A fool should a grass-tip employ (as self-punishment),
His value is not even one in sixteen
Of that person who Dhamma, with insight, has seen.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 70 Let a fool month after month eat his food (like an ascetic) with the tip of a blade of Kusa grass, yet he is not worth the sixteenth particle of those who have well weighed the law.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 70
Month by month can a fool eat his food with a blade of the kusa grass,
he is not worth a sixteenth part of those, who have realized the Dharma. [DLMBSFn-V070]
Dhammapada Dhp. 071
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
71. Na hi pāpaṃ kataṃ kamma sajju khīraṃ'va muccati
Ḍahantaṃ bālamanveti bhasmacchanno'va pāvako.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
71. Na hi pāpaṃ kataṃ kammaṃ, sajju khīraṃva muccati;
Ḍahantaṃ bālamanveti, bhasmacchannova [bhasmāchannova (sī. pī. ka.)] pāvako.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

EVIL TAKES EFFECT AT THE OPPORTUNE MOMENT

  1. Verily, an evil deed committed does not immediately bear fruit, just as milk curdles not at once; smouldering, it follows the fool like fire covered with ashes.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 71. Truly, an evil deed committed does not immediately bear fruit, like milk that does not turn sour all at once. But smoldering, it follows the fool like fire covered by ashes.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

71 [ThaniSFn-V71]

An evil deed, when done,
doesn't — like ready milk —
come out right away.
It follows the fool,
       smoldering
like a fire
hidden in ashes.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
71
Though milk squirts out immediately,
Iniquity’s corollary
Will burn the fool enduringly,
Like coal that smoulders steadily.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 71 An evil deed, like newly-drawn milk, does not turn (suddenly); smouldering, like fire covered by ashes, it follows the fool.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 71
An evil deed when done, doesn't instantly bear fruits; just like milk does not coagulate at once.
Burning, it follows the fool like fire covered with ashes. [DLMBSFn-V071]
Dhammapada Dhp. 072
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
72. Yāvadeva anatthāya ñattaṃ bālassa jāyati
Hanti bālassa sukkaṃsaṃ muddhamassa vipātayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
72. Yāvadeva anatthāya, ñattaṃ [ñātaṃ (?)] bālassa jāyati;
Hanti bālassa sukkaṃsaṃ, muddhamassa vipātayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

KNOWLEDGE AND FAME TEND TO THE RUIN OF FOOLS

  1. To his ruin, indeed, the fool gains knowledge and fame; they destroy his bright lot and cleave his head. [NāradaFn05-07]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 72. To his own ruin the fool gains knowledge, for it cleaves his head and destroys his innate goodness.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

72-74

Only for his ruin
does renown come to the fool.
It ravages his bright fortune
& rips his head     apart.

He would want unwarranted status,
preeminence     among monks,
authority       among monasteries,
homage      from lay families.

'Let householders & those gone forth
both think that this
was done by me alone.
May I alone determine
what's a duty, what's not':
  the resolve of a fool
  as they grow —
     his desire & pride.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
72
Training arises for a fool, to his detriment. It ruins any goodness in him, and utterly destroys him.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 72 And when the evil deed, after it has become known, brings sorrow to the fool, then it destroys his bright lot, nay, it cleaves his head.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 72
A fool gains knowledge altogether for his harm.
It kills his fortune; it destroys his head. [DLMBSFn-V072]
Dhammapada Dhp. 073
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
73. Asataṃ bhāvanamiccheyya purekkhārañca bhikkhusu
Āvāsesu ca issariyaṃ pūjā parakulesu ca.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
73. Asantaṃ bhāvanamiccheyya [asantaṃ bhāvamiccheyya (syā.), asantabhāvanamiccheyya (ka.)], purekkhārañca bhikkhusu;
Āvāsesu ca issariyaṃ, pūjā parakulesu ca.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE IGNORANT SEEK UNDUE FAME

  1. The fool will desire undue reputation, precedence among monks, authority in the monasteries, honour among other families.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 73. The fool seeks undeserved reputation, precedence among monks, authority over monasteries, and honor among householders.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

72-74

Only for his ruin
does renown come to the fool.
It ravages his bright fortune
& rips his head     apart.

He would want unwarranted status,
preeminence     among monks,
authority       among monasteries,
homage      from lay families.

'Let householders & those gone forth
both think that this
was done by me alone.
May I alone determine
what's a duty, what's not':
  the resolve of a fool
  as they grow —
     his desire & pride.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
73
A fool might wish for undue reverence,
To be the master of the residence,
‘Midst monks to have the right to precedence,
And from the folk, respectful deference.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 73 Let the fool wish for a false reputation, for precedence among the Bhikshus, for lordship in the convents, for worship among other people!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 73
He might want undue respect, deference from monks,
supremacy over dwellings and devotion from other families. [DLMBSFn-V073]
Dhammapada Dhp. 074
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
74. Mameva kataṃ maññantū gihī pabbajitā ubho
Mameva ativasā assu kiccākiccesu kismici
Iti bālassa saṃkappo icchā māno ca vaḍḍhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
74. Mameva kata maññantu, gihīpabbajitā ubho;
Mamevātivasā assu, kiccākiccesu kismici;
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Let both laymen and monks think, "by myself was this done; in every work, great or small, let them refer to me". Such is the ambition of the fool; his desires and pride increase.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 74. "Let both laymen and monks think that it was done by me. In every work, great and small, let them follow me" — such is the ambition of the fool; thus his desire and pride increase.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

72-74

Only for his ruin
does renown come to the fool.
It ravages his bright fortune
& rips his head     apart.

He would want unwarranted status,
preeminence     among monks,
authority       among monasteries,
homage      from lay families.

'Let householders & those gone forth
both think that this
was done by me alone.
May I alone determine
what's a duty, what's not':
  the resolve of a fool
  as they grow —
     his desire & pride.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
74
“Let monks and all the folk conceive
The author of these things was me!
And in their many undertakings,
May they take up my suggestions!”
For this fool, his thoughts unwise,
His pride expands, his longings thrive.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 74 "May both the layman and he who has left the world think that this is done by me; may they be subject to me in everything which is to be done or is not to be done," thus is the mind of the fool, and his desire and pride increase.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 74
"Let both householders and monks think that it was done by me,
let them be under my will, in whatever duties."
Such are fool's thoughts. His desire and pride grows. [DLMBSFn-V074]
Dhammapada Dhp. 075
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
75. Aññā hi lābhūpanisā aññā nibbānagāminī75
Evametaṃ abhiññāya bhikkhu buddhassa sāvako
Sakkāraṃ nābhinandeyya vivekamanubrūhaye.

Bālavaggo pañcamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
75. Aññā hi lābhūpanisā, aññā nibbānagāminī;
Evametaṃ abhiññāya, bhikkhu buddhassa sāvako;
Sakkāraṃ nābhinandeyya, vivekamanubrūhaye.

Bālavaggo pañcamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE PATH TO GAIN IS ONE AND TO NIBBĀNA IS ANOTHER

  1. Surely the path that leads to worldly gain is one, and the path that leads to Nibbāna is another; understanding this, the bhikkhu, the disciple of the Buddha, should not rejoice in worldly favours, but cultivate detachment. [NāradaFn05-08]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 75. One is the quest for worldly gain, and quite another is the path to Nibbana. Clearly understanding this, let not the monk, the disciple of the Buddha, be carried away by worldly acclaim, but develop detachment instead.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

75

The path to material gain
  goes one way,
the way to Unbinding,
  another.
Realizing this, the monk,
a disciple to the Awakened One,
should not relish offerings,
should cultivate        seclusion
     instead.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
75
One path leads to liberation;
One to gifts accumulation.
Those who pay the Lord attention
See both paths with comprehension.
With no like for veneration,
May they strive in isolation!
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 75 "One is the road that leads to wealth, another the road that leads to Nirvana;" if the Bhikshu, the disciple of Buddha, has learnt this, he will not yearn for honour, he will strive after separation from the world.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 75
Something else are worldly gains, something else is the path leading to the Nirvana.
Thus let a monk, the Buddha's student, having fully understood this,
not rejoice at worship, but let him devote himself to solitude. [DLMBSFn-V075]
Dhammapada Dhp. 076
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Paṇḍitavaggo.
76. Nidhinaṃ'va pavattāraṃ yaṃ passe vajjadassinaṃ
Niggayhavādiṃ medhāviṃ tādisaṃ paṇḍitaṃ bhaje
Tādisaṃ bhajamānassa seyyo hoti na pāpiyo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

6. Paṇḍitavaggo

76. Nidhīnaṃva pavattāraṃ, yaṃ passe vajjadassinaṃ;
Niggayhavādiṃ medhāviṃ, tādisaṃ paṇḍitaṃ bhaje;
Tādisaṃ bhajamānassa, seyyo hoti na pāpiyo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 6 The Wise

ASSOCIATE WITH THE WISE WHO TRY TO CORRECT YOU

  1. Should one see a wise man, who, like a revealer of treasure, points out faults and reproves; let one associate with such a wise person; it will be better, not worse, for him who associates with such a one.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp VI The Wise

76. Should one find a man who points out faults and who reproves, let him follow such a wise and sagacious person as one would a guide to hidden treasure. It is always better, and never worse, to cultivate such an association.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp VI The Wise

76-77

Regard him as one who
      points out
      treasure,
 the wise one who
 seeing your faults
      rebukes you.
 Stay with this sort of sage.
 For the one who stays
 with a sage of this sort,
      things get better,
      not worse.

 Let him admonish, instruct,
   deflect you
 away from poor manners.
 To the good, he's endearing;
 to the bad, he's not.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 6 The Wise

76 & 77
A sage who chides with words of censure,
Showing faults like showing treasure:
If with her you’d pair together,
Then you’d be not worse, but better.
Let her censure, give instruction,
And restrain you from corruption.
Though by wastrels she’s abhorred,
By the sterling, she’s adored.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter VI: The Wise Man (Pandita)

76 If you see an intelligent man who tells you where true treasures are to be found, who shows what is to be avoided, and administers reproofs, follow that wise man; it will be better, not worse, for those who follow him.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 6: The Wise

DhP 76
Should one see an intelligent person, who speaks rebukingly,
who can see faults as if showing treasures, one should associate with such a wise one.
Associating with such people is better, not worse. [DLMBSFn-V076]
Dhammapada Dhp. 077
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
77. Ovadeyyanusāseyya asabbhā ca nivāraye
Sataṃ hi so piyo hoti asataṃ hoti appiyo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
77. Ovadeyyānusāseyya, asabbhā ca nivāraye;
Satañhi so piyo hoti, asataṃ hoti appiyo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ADVISERS ARE PLEASING TO THE GOOD, BUT NOT TO THE BAD

  1. Let him advise, instruct, and dissuade one from evil; truly pleasing is he to the good, displeasing is he to the bad.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 77. Let him admonish, instruct and shield one from wrong; he, indeed, is dear to the good and detestable to the evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]
76-77
Regard him as one who
      points out
      treasure,
the wise one who
seeing your faults
     rebukes you.
Stay with this sort of sage.
For the one who stays
with a sage of this sort,
     things get better,
     not worse.

Let him admonish, instruct,
  deflect you
away from poor manners.
To the good, he's endearing;
to the bad, he's not.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
76 & 77
A sage who chides with words of censure,
Showing faults like showing treasure:
If with her you’d pair together,
Then you’d be not worse, but better.
Let her censure, give instruction,
And restrain you from corruption.
Though by wastrels she’s abhorred,
By the sterling, she’s adored.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 77 Let him admonish, let him teach, let him forbid what is improper!- -he will be beloved of the good, by the bad he will be hated.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 77
He should admonish, he should advice, and he should restrain one from evil.
He is indeed dear to the good ones and he is not agreeable to the bad ones. [DLMBSFn-V077]
Dhammapada Dhp. 078
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
78. Na bhaje pāpake mitte na bhaje purisādhame
Bhajetha mitte kalyāṇe bhajetha purisuttame.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
78. Na bhaje pāpake mitte, na bhaje purisādhame;
Bhajetha mitte kalyāṇe, bhajetha purisuttame.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

CULTIVATE GOOD FRIENDSHIP

  1. Associate not with evil friends, associate not with mean men; associate with good friends, associate with noble men.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 78. Do not associate with evil companions; do not seek the fellowship of the vile. Associate with the good friends; seek the fellowship of noble men.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]
78
Don't associate with bad friends.
Don't associate with the low.
Associate with admirable friends.
Associate with the best.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
78
With evil friends don’t socialise;
With vulgar folk don’t fraternise.
With virtuous comrades congregate;
With noble beings collaborate.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 78 Do not have evil-doers for friends, do not have low people for friends: have virtuous people for friends, have for friends the best of men.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 78
One should not associate with evil friends; one should not associate with vile people.
Associate with virtuous friends; associate with noble people. [DLMBSFn-V078]
Dhammapada Dhp. 079
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
79. Dhammapīti sukhaṃ seti vippasannena tejasā
Ariyappavedite dhamme sadā ramati paṇḍito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
79. Dhammapīti sukhaṃ seti, vippasannena cetasā;
Ariyappavedite dhamme, sadā ramati paṇḍito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HAPPILY HE LIVES WHO DRINKS OF THE DHAMMA

  1. He who imbibes the Dhamma abides in happiness with mind pacified; the wise man ever delights in the Dhamma revealed by the Ariyas. [NāradaFn06-01]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 79. He who drinks deep the Dhamma lives happily with a tranquil mind. The wise man ever delights in the Dhamma made known by the Noble One (the Buddha).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

79 [ThaniSFn-V79]

Drinking the Dhamma,
refreshed by the Dhamma,
one sleeps at ease
with clear awareness & calm.
In the Dhamma revealed
by the noble ones,
the wise person
  always delights.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
79
One who drinks Dhamma abides
Happy, with purified mind.
The learned ones ever will savour
The teachings made known by the Buddha.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 79 He who drinks in the law lives happily with a serene mind: the sage rejoices always in the law, as preached by the elect (Ariyas).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 79
One who finds joy in the Dharma dwells happily, with a bright mind.
The wise man always delights in the Dharma taught by the noble ones. [DLMBSFn-V079]
Dhammapada Dhp. 080
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
80. Udakaṃ hi nayanti nettikā usukārā namayanti tejanaṃ
Dāruṃ namayanti tacchakā attānaṃ damayanti paṇḍitā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
80. Udakañhi nayanti nettikā, usukārā namayanti [damayanti (ka.)] tejanaṃ;
Dāruṃ namayanti tacchakā, attānaṃ damayanti paṇḍitā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE WISE CONTROL THEMSELVES

  1. Irrigators lead the waters; fletchers bend the shafts; carpenters bend the wood; the wise control themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 80. Irrigators regulate the rivers; fletchers straighten the arrow shaft; carpenters shape the wood; the wise control themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

80

Irrigators guide    the water.
Fletchers shape     the arrow shaft.
Carpenters shape    the wood.
The wise control
             themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
80
Farmers channel water;
Craftsmen fashion timber;
Fletchers trim their arrowshafts;
Those of wisdom train themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 80 Well-makers lead the water (wherever they like); fletchers bend the arrow; carpenters bend a log of wood; wise people fashion themselves.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 80
Irrigators lead water. Arrow-makers bend arrow-shaft.
Carpenters bend wood. Wise ones master themselves. [DLMBSFn-V080]
Dhammapada Dhp. 081
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
81. Selo yathā ekaghano vātena na samīrati
Evaṃ nindāpasaṃsāsu na samiñjanti paṇḍitā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
81. Selo yathā ekaghano [ekagghano (ka.)], vātena na samīrati;
Evaṃ nindāpasaṃsāsu, na samiñjanti paṇḍitā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

UNSHAKEN AS A ROCK ARE THE WISE AMIDST PRAISE AND BLAME

  1. As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, even so the wise are not ruffled by praise or blame.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 81. Just as a solid rock is not shaken by the storm, even so the wise are not affected by praise or blame.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

81

As a single slab of rock
won't budge in the wind,
so the wise are not moved
  by praise,
  by blame.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
81
A solid rock by wind is undisturbed:
The wise by praise and blame are unperturbed.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 81 As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, wise people falter not amidst blame and praise.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 81
Just like a compact rock is not moved by the wind,
so the wise ones are not shaken by blame or praise. [DLMBSFn-V081]
Dhammapada Dhp. 082
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
82. Yathāpi rahado gambhīro vippasanno anāvilo
Evaṃ dhammāni sutvāna vippasīdanti paṇḍitā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
82. Yathāpi rahado gambhīro, vippasanno anāvilo;
Evaṃ dhammāni sutvāna, vippasīdanti paṇḍitā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE WISE ARE PEACEFUL

  1. Just as a deep lake is clear and still, even so, on hearing the teachings, the wise become exceedingly peaceful. [NāradaFn06-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 82. On hearing the Teachings, the wise become perfectly purified, like a lake deep, clear and still.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

82

Like a deep lake,
clear, unruffled, & calm:
so the wise become clear,
  calm,
on hearing words of the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
82
A fathomless water serene
That sparkles like glass is idyllic.
The person who Dhamma receives
Is someone who’s likewise pacific.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 82 Wise people, after they have listened to the laws, become serene, like a deep, smooth, and still lake.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 82
Just like a lake, deep, bright and clean,
so the wise ones become tranquil, after having heard the teachings. [DLMBSFn-V082]
Dhammapada Dhp. 083
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
83. Sabbattha ve sappurisā cajanti na kāmakāmā lapayanti santo
Sukhena phuṭṭhā atha vā dukhena noccāvacaṃ paṇḍitā dassayanti.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
83. Sabbattha ve sappurisā cajanti, na kāmakāmā lapayanti santo;
Sukhena phuṭṭhā atha vā dukhena, na uccāvacaṃ [noccāvacaṃ (sī. aṭṭha.)] paṇḍitā dassayanti.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE WISE ARE NEITHER ELATED NOR DEPRESSED

  1. The good give up (attachment for) everything; [NāradaFn06-03] the saintly prattle not with sensual craving: whether affected by happiness or by pain, the wise show neither elation nor depression.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 83. The good renounce (attachment for) everything. The virtuous do not prattle with a yearning for pleasures. The wise show no elation or depression when touched by happiness or sorrow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

83 [ThaniSFn-V83]

Everywhere, truly,
those of integrity
  stand  apart.
They, the good,
don't chatter in hopes
of favor or gains.
When touched
  now by pleasure,
  now pain,
the wise give no sign
  of high
  or low.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
83
True men shed things altogether;
Pure men hint not seeking pleasure.
Touched by joy or tribulation,
They grieve not, nor show elation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 83 Good people walk on whatever befall, the good do not prattle, longing for pleasure; whether touched by happiness or sorrow wise people never appear elated or depressed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 83
True people abandon everything. Good people do not mutter, desiring pleasure.
Wise people do not show elation or depression when they are affected by happiness or suffering. [DLMBSFn-V083]
Dhammapada Dhp. 084
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
84. Na attahetu na parassa hetu
Na puttamicche na dhanaṃ na raṭṭhaṃ
Na iccheyya adhammena samiddhimattano
Sa sīlavā paññavā dhammiko siyā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
84. Na attahetu na parassa hetu, na puttamicche na dhanaṃ na raṭṭhaṃ;
Na iccheyya [nayicche (pī.), nicche (?)] adhammena samiddhimattano, sa sīlavā paññavā dhammiko siyā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SUCCESS SHOULD NOT BE SOUGHT BY WRONGFUL MEANS

  1. Neither for the sake of oneself nor for the sake of another (does a wise person do any wrong); he should not desire son, wealth or kingdom (by doing wrong): by unjust means he should not seek his own success. Then (only) such a one is indeed virtuous, wise and righteous.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 84. He is indeed virtuous, wise, and righteous who neither for his own sake nor for the sake of another (does any wrong), who does not crave for sons, wealth, or kingdom, and does not desire success by unjust means.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

84

One who wouldn't —
not for his own sake
nor that of another —
hanker for
  wealth,
  a son,
  a kingdom,
  his own fulfillment,
by unrighteous means:
he is righteous, rich
     in virtue,
     discernment.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
84
Not for another, and not for yourself,
Should you seek for an empire, for sons or for wealth.
Nor should you long for dishonest success,
But rather should aim to be wise and righteous.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 84 If, whether for his own sake, or for the sake of others, a man wishes neither for a son, nor for wealth, nor for lordship, and if he does not wish for his own success by unfair means, then he is good, wise, and virtuous.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 84
One should not want a son, wealth or kingdom, not for one's own sake, not for the sake of others,
one should not want one's own prosperity by injustice. Such a person is virtuous, wise and righteous. [DLMBSFn-V084]
Dhammapada Dhp. 085
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
85. Appakā te manussesu ye janā pāragāmino
Athāyaṃ itarā pajā tīramevānudhāvati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
85. Appakā te manussesu, ye janā pāragāmino;
Athāyaṃ itarā pajā, tīramevānudhāvati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

FEW GO BEYOND

  1. Few are there amongst men who go Beyond; the rest of mankind only run about on the bank. [NāradaFn06-04]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 85. Few among men are those who cross to the farther shore. The rest, the bulk of men, only run up and down the hither bank.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

85-89 [ThaniSFn-V86] , [ThaniSFn-V89]

Few are the people
who reach the Far Shore.
  These others
  simply scurry along
  this shore.

But those who practice Dhamma
in line with the well-taught Dhamma,
will cross over the realm of Death
so hard to transcend.

 Forsaking dark practices,
  the wise person
should develop the bright,
having gone from home
  to no-home
in seclusion, so hard to enjoy.

There he should wish for delight,
discarding sensuality —
  he who has nothing.
He should cleanse himself — wise —
of what defiles the mind.

Whose minds are well-developed
in the factors of self-awakening,
who delight in non-clinging,
relinquishing grasping —
  resplendent,
  their effluents ended:
  they, in the world,
  are Unbound.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
85
Few amongst mortals will cross to that land:
Most will just stroll about here on the strand.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 85 Few are there among men who arrive at the other shore (become Arhats); the other people here run up and down the shore.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 85
Few are those amongst people, who have gone to the other shore.
And these other people just follow this shore. [DLMBSFn-V085]
Dhammapada Dhp. 086
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
86. Ye ca kho sammadakkhāte dhamme dhammānuvattino
Te janā pāramessanti maccudheyyaṃ suduttaraṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
86. Ye ca kho sammadakkhāte, dhamme dhammānuvattino;
Te janā pāramessanti, maccudheyyaṃ suduttaraṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THOSE WHO FOLLOW THE DHAMMA GO BEYOND

  1. But those who act rightly according to the teaching, which is well expounded, those are they who will reach the Beyond - Nibbāna - (crossing) the realm of passions, [NāradaFn06-05] so hard to cross.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 86. But those who act according to the perfectly taught Dhamma will cross the realm of Death, so difficult to cross.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

85-89 [ThaniSFn-V86] , [ThaniSFn-V89]

Few are the people
who reach the Far Shore.
  These others
  simply scurry along
  this shore.

But those who practice Dhamma
in line with the well-taught Dhamma,
will cross over the realm of Death
so hard to transcend.

 Forsaking dark practices,
  the wise person
should develop the bright,
having gone from home
  to no-home
in seclusion, so hard to enjoy.

There he should wish for delight,
discarding sensuality —
  he who has nothing.
He should cleanse himself — wise —
of what defiles the mind.

Whose minds are well-developed
in the factors of self-awakening,
who delight in non-clinging,
relinquishing grasping —
  resplendent,
  their effluents ended:
  they, in the world,
  are Unbound.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
86
Conducting themselves in conformity
To Dhamma, expounded so thoroughly,
They will transcend the vast sphere of mortality,
Freedom from which is achieved with great difficulty.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 86 But those who, when the law has been well preached to them, follow the law, will pass across the dominion of death, however difficult to overcome.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 86
And those who in the well-taught Dharma behave according to it,
those people will go beyond the realm of death, that is so difficult to cross. [DLMBSFn-V086]
Dhammapada Dhp. 087
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
87. Kaṇhaṃ dhammaṃ vippahāya sukkaṃ bhāvetha paṇḍito
Okā anokaṃ āgamma viveke yattha dūramaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
87. Kaṇhaṃ dhammaṃ vippahāya, sukkaṃ bhāvetha paṇḍito;
Okā anokamāgamma, viveke yattha dūramaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GIVE UP EVIL, CULTIVATE GOOD     SEEK HAPPINESS IN SOLITUDE    THE NON-ATTACHED ARE PEACEFUL

87-88. Coming from home to the homeless, the wise man should abandon dark states [NāradaFn06-06] and cultivate the bright. He should seek great delight in detachment (Nibbāna), so hard to enjoy. Giving up sensual pleasures, with no impediments, [NāradaFn06-07] the wise man should cleanse himself of the impurities of the mind.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 87-88. Abandoning the dark way, let the wise man cultivate the bright path. Having gone from home to homelessness, let him yearn for that delight in detachment, so difficult to enjoy. Giving up sensual pleasures, with no attachment, let the wise man cleanse himself of defilements of the mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

85-89 [ThaniSFn-V86] , [ThaniSFn-V89]

Few are the people
who reach the Far Shore.
  These others
  simply scurry along
  this shore.

But those who practice Dhamma
in line with the well-taught Dhamma,
will cross over the realm of Death
so hard to transcend.

 Forsaking dark practices,
  the wise person
should develop the bright,
having gone from home
  to no-home
in seclusion, so hard to enjoy.

There he should wish for delight,
discarding sensuality —
  he who has nothing.
He should cleanse himself — wise —
of what defiles the mind.

Whose minds are well-developed
in the factors of self-awakening,
who delight in non-clinging,
relinquishing grasping —
  resplendent,
  their effluents ended:
  they, in the world,
  are Unbound.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
87 & 88
Having left their homes for homelessness,
The learned ones, possessionless,
Should aim for inner happiness
In hard-to-relish loneliness.
They must leave all states of murkiness
And cultivate what’s luminous,
Abandon all voluptuousness,
And purge their minds’ uncleanliness.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 87, 88. A wise man should leave the dark state (of ordinary life), and follow the bright state (of the Bhikshu). After going from his home to a homeless state, he should in his retirement look for enjoyment where there seemed to be no enjoyment. Leaving all pleasures behind, and calling nothing his own, the wise man should purge himself from all the troubles of the mind.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 87
Having abandoned the bad states let the wise man develop the good states.
having come from the house into houselessness, into solitude, which is not fit for pleasures. [DLMBSFn-V087]
Dhammapada Dhp. 088
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
88. Tatrābhiratimiccheyya hitvā kāme akiñcano
Pariyodapeyya attānaṃ cittaklesehi paṇḍito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
88.
Tatrābhiratimiccheyya, hitvā kāme akiñcano;
Pariyodapeyya [pariyodāpeyya (?)] attānaṃ, cittaklesehi paṇḍito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 87-88. Coming from home to the homeless, the wise man should abandon dark states [NāradaFn06-06] and cultivate the bright. He should seek great delight in detachment (Nibbāna), so hard to enjoy. Giving up sensual pleasures, with no impediments, [NāradaFn06-07] the wise man should cleanse himself of the impurities of the mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 87-88. Abandoning the dark way, let the wise man cultivate the bright path. Having gone from home to homelessness, let him yearn for that delight in detachment, so difficult to enjoy. Giving up sensual pleasures, with no attachment, let the wise man cleanse himself of defilements of the mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

85-89 [ThaniSFn-V86] , [ThaniSFn-V89]

Few are the people
who reach the Far Shore.
  These others
  simply scurry along
  this shore.

But those who practice Dhamma
in line with the well-taught Dhamma,
will cross over the realm of Death
so hard to transcend.

 Forsaking dark practices,
  the wise person
should develop the bright,
having gone from home
  to no-home
in seclusion, so hard to enjoy.

There he should wish for delight,
discarding sensuality —
  he who has nothing.
He should cleanse himself — wise —
of what defiles the mind.

Whose minds are well-developed
in the factors of self-awakening,
who delight in non-clinging,
relinquishing grasping —
  resplendent,
  their effluents ended:
  they, in the world,
  are Unbound.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
87 & 88
Having left their homes for homelessness,
The learned ones, possessionless,
Should aim for inner happiness
In hard-to-relish loneliness.
They must leave all states of murkiness
And cultivate what’s luminous,
Abandon all voluptuousness,
And purge their minds’ uncleanliness.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 87, 88. A wise man should leave the dark state (of ordinary life), and follow the bright state (of the Bhikshu). After going from his home to a homeless state, he should in his retirement look for enjoyment where there seemed to be no enjoyment. Leaving all pleasures behind, and calling nothing his own, the wise man should purge himself from all the troubles of the mind.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 88
A wise one should want delight there, having renounced the sense-pleasures,
without anything and having cleansed himself from the impurities of mind. [DLMBSFn-V088]
Dhammapada Dhp. 089
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
89. Yesaṃ sambodhiaṅgesu sammā cittaṃ subhāvitaṃ89
Ādānapaṭinissagge anupādāya ye ratā
Khīṇāsavā jutimanto te loke parinibbutā.

Paṇḍitavaggo chaṭṭho.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
89. Yesaṃ sambodhiyaṅgesu, sammā cittaṃ subhāvitaṃ;
Ādānapaṭinissagge, anupādāya ye ratā;
Khīṇāsavā jutimanto, te loke parinibbutā.

Paṇḍitavaggo chaṭṭho niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Whose minds are well perfected in the Factors of Enlightenment, [NāradaFn06-08] who, without clinging, delight in "the giving up of grasping" [NāradaFn06-09] (i.e., Nibbāna), they, the corruption-free, shining ones, have attained Nibbāna even in this world.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 89. Those whose minds have reached full excellence in the factors of enlightenment, who, having renounced acquisitiveness, rejoice in not clinging to things — rid of cankers, glowing with wisdom, they have attained Nibbana in this very life. [BudRkFn-v89]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

85-89 [ThaniSFn-V86] , [ThaniSFn-V89]

Few are the people
who reach the Far Shore.
  These others
  simply scurry along
  this shore.

But those who practice Dhamma
in line with the well-taught Dhamma,
will cross over the realm of Death
so hard to transcend.

 Forsaking dark practices,
  the wise person
should develop the bright,
having gone from home
  to no-home
in seclusion, so hard to enjoy.

There he should wish for delight,
discarding sensuality —
  he who has nothing.
He should cleanse himself — wise —
of what defiles the mind.

Whose minds are well-developed
in the factors of self-awakening,
who delight in non-clinging,
relinquishing grasping —
  resplendent,
  their effluents ended:
  they, in the world,
  are Unbound.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
89
Their minds are well-developed in components of enlightenment;
They’re free of all attachment, and delight in disentanglement;
Their cankers are extinguished and their mental states are brilliant:
The people in this world who’ve gained that freedom most magnificent.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 89 Those whose mind is well grounded in the (seven) elements of knowledge, who without clinging to anything, rejoice in freedom from attachment, whose appetites have been conquered, and who are full of light, are free (even) in this world.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 89
People, whose mind is truly well developed in the constituents of awakenment,
who are delighting in renunciation of attachments, without clinging,
with the taints removed and brilliant, they are completely emancipated in this world. [DLMBSFn-V089]
Dhammapada Dhp. 090
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Arahantavaggo.
90. Gataddhino visokassa vippamuttassa sabbadhi90
Sabbaganthappahīṇassa pariḷāho na vijjati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

7. Arahantavaggo

90. Gataddhino visokassa, vippamuttassa sabbadhi;
Sabbaganthappahīnassa, pariḷāho na vijjati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 7 Arahanta Vagga [NāradaFn07-01] The Worthy

NO SUFFERING FOR THE EMANCIPATED

  1. For him who has completed the journey, [NāradaFn07-02] for him who is sorrowless, for him who from everything [NāradaFn07-03] is wholly free, [NāradaFn07-04] for him who has destroyed all Ties, [NāradaFn07-05] the fever (of passion) exists not. [NāradaFn07-06]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp VII The Arahant or Perfected One

90. The fever of passion exists not for him who has completed the journey, who is sorrowless and wholly set free, and has broken all ties.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp VII Arahants

90

     In one who
has gone the full distance,
is free from sorrow,
is fully released
       in all respects,
has abandoned all bonds:
       no fever is found.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 7 The Arahant

90

In a person
          who has completed the journey;
          who is free of sorrow;
          who is completely liberated from all things;
          who is free of all bonds:
burning distress is not found.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter VII: The Venerable (Arhat)

90 There is no suffering for him who has finished his journey, and abandoned grief, who has freed himself on all sides, and thrown off all fetters.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 7: The Arahant

DhP 90
Pain does not exist for one, who has finished the journey, is without sorrow,
who is emancipated in every respect and who has abandoned all bonds. [DLMBSFn-V090]
Dhammapada Dhp. 091
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
91. Uyyuñjanti satimanto na nikete ramanti te
Haṃsā'va pallalaṃ hitvā okamoka jahanti te.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
91. Uyyuñjanti satīmanto, na nikete ramanti te;
Haṃsāva pallalaṃ hitvā, okamokaṃ jahanti te.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ARAHANTS ARE FREE FROM ATTACHMENT

  1. The mindful exert themselves. To no abode are they attached. Like swans that quit their pools, home after home they abandon (and go). [NāradaFn07-07]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 91. The mindful ones exert themselves. They are not attached to any home; like swans that abandon the lake, they leave home after home behind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

91

The mindful keep active,
don't delight in settling back.
They renounce every home,
     every home,
like swans taking off from a lake.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
91
Mindful beings get on their way:
They don’t enjoy in homes to stay.
Hearths and homes those men forsake,
Like swans depart a charming lake.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 91 They depart with their thoughts well-collected, they are not happy in their abode; like swans who have left their lake, they leave their house and home.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 91
Mindful ones depart; they do not find delight in houses.
They abandon every abode, just like swans leave a pond. [DLMBSFn-V091]
Dhammapada Dhp. 092
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
92. Yesaṃ sannicayo natthi ye pariññātabhojanā
Suññato animitto ca vimokkho yesa gocarā
Ākāse'va sakuntānaṃ gati tesaṃ durannayā
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
92. Yesaṃ sannicayo natthi, ye pariññātabhojanā;
Suññato animitto ca, vimokkho yesaṃ gocaro;
Ākāse va sakuntānaṃ [sakuṇānaṃ (ka.)], gati tesaṃ durannayā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE NOT ATTACHED TO FOOD

  1. They for whom there is no accumulation, [NāradaFn07-08] who reflect well over their food, [NāradaFn07-09] who have Deliverance [NāradaFn07-10] which is Void and Signless, as their object - their course, like that of birds in the air, cannot be traced.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 92. Those who do not accumulate and are wise regarding food, whose object is the Void, the Unconditioned Freedom — their track cannot be traced, like that of birds in the air.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

92-93 [ThaniSFn-V92-93]

Not hoarding,
having comprehended food,
their pasture — emptiness
& freedom without sign:
  their trail,
like that of birds through space,
  can't be traced.

Effluents ended,
independent of nutriment,
their pasture — emptiness
& freedom without sign:
  their trail,
like that of birds through space,
  can't be traced.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
92
Those who hoards of goods don’t keep,
Who see with wisdom what they eat,
Who focus on, in meditation,
Signless void emancipation:
Unknowable their future state,
Like birds that through the skies migrate.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 92 Men who have no riches, who live on recognised food, who have perceived void and unconditioned freedom (Nirvana), their path is difficult to understand, like that of birds in the air.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 92
Those, who do not accumulate and have well understood food,
whose sphere is the void emancipation without attributes -
their course is difficult to find out - like the course of the birds in the sky. [DLMBSFn-V092]
Dhammapada Dhp. 093
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
93. Yassāsavā parikkhīṇā āhāre ca anissito
Suññato animitto ca vimokkho yassa gocaro
Ākāse'va sakuntānaṃ padaṃ tassa durannayaṃ
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
93. Yassāsavā parikkhīṇā, āhāre ca anissito;
Suññato animitto ca, vimokkho yassa gocaro;
Ākāse va sakuntānaṃ, padaṃ tassa durannayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

FREE ARE THE UNDEFILED ONES

  1. He whose corruptions are destroyed, he who is not attached to food, he who has Deliverance, which is Void and Signless, as his object - his path, like that of birds in the air, cannot be traced.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 93. He whose cankers are destroyed and who is not attached to food, whose object is the Void, the Unconditioned Freedom — his path cannot be traced, like that of birds in the air.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

92-93 [ThaniSFn-V92-93]

Not hoarding,
having comprehended food,
their pasture — emptiness
& freedom without sign:
  their trail,
like that of birds through space,
  can't be traced.

Effluents ended,
independent of nutriment,
their pasture — emptiness
& freedom without sign:
  their trail,
like that of birds through space,
  can't be traced.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
93
Those who do not cling to food,
The taints of whom are all removed,
Who focus on, in meditation,
Signless void emancipation:
Their final path is hard to spy
As that in space on which birds fly.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 93 He whose appetites are stilled, who is not absorbed in enjoyment, who has perceived void and unconditioned freedom (Nirvana), his path is difficult to understand, like that of birds in the air.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 93
Whose taints are completely removed, who is not attached to food,
whose sphere is the void emancipation without attributes -
his course is difficult to find out - like the path of the birds in the sky. [DLMBSFn-V093]
Dhammapada Dhp. 094
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
94. Yassindriyāni samathaṃ gatāni assā yathā sārathinā sudantā
Pahīṇamānassa anāsavassa
Devā'pi tassa pihayanti tādino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
94. Yassindriyāni samathaṅgatāni [samathaṃ gatāni (sī. pī.)], assā yathā sārathinā sudantā;
Pahīnamānassa anāsavassa, devāpi tassa pihayanti tādino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE SENSE-CONTROLLED ARE DEAR TO ALL

  1. He whose senses are subdued, like steeds well-trained by a charioteer, he whose pride is destroyed and is free from the corruptions - such a steadfast one even the gods hold dear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 94. Even the gods hold dear the wise one, whose senses are subdued like horses well trained by a charioteer, whose pride is destroyed and who is free from the cankers.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

94-96 [ThaniSFn-V94] , [ThaniSFn-V95]

He whose senses are steadied
  like stallions
well-trained by the charioteer,
his conceit abandoned,
  free of effluent,
  Such:
even devas adore him.

Like the earth, he doesn't react —
  cultured,
  Such,
like Indra's pillar,
like a lake free of mud.
For him
     — Such —
there's no traveling on.

Calm is his mind,
calm his speech
  & his deed:
one who's released through right knowing,
  pacified,
  Such.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
94
One who has calmed his faculties - like a charioteer his well-trained horses - and who has abandoned the presumption of a ‘me’, and who is free of the asavas, even the devas adore him.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 94 The gods even envy him whose senses, like horses well broken in by the driver, have been subdued, who is free from pride, and free from appetites.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 94
Whose senses are quieted, just like horses well tamed by the charioteer,
even the gods do envy such one, who has abandoned pride and is free from taints. [DLMBSFn-V094]
Dhammapada Dhp. 095
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
95. Paṭhavisamo no virujjhati indakhīlūpamo tādi subbato
Rahado'va apetakaddamo saṃsārā na bhavanti tādino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
95. Pathavisamo no virujjhati, indakhilupamo [indakhīlūpamo (sī. syā. ka.)] tādi subbato;
Rahadova apetakaddamo, saṃsārā na bhavanti tādino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LIKE THE EARTH ARAHANTS RESENT NOT

  1. Like the earth a balanced and well-disciplined person resents not. He is comparable to an Indakhīla. [NāradaFn07-11] Like a pool unsullied by mud, is he; to such a balanced one [NāradaFn07-12] life's wanderings do not arise. [NāradaFn07-13]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 95. There is no more worldly existence for the wise one who, like the earth, resents nothing, who is firm as a high pillar and as pure as a deep pool free from mud.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

94-96 [ThaniSFn-V94] , [ThaniSFn-V95]

He whose senses are steadied
  like stallions
well-trained by the charioteer,
his conceit abandoned,
  free of effluent,
  Such:
even devas adore him.

Like the earth, he doesn't react —
  cultured,
  Such,
like Indra's pillar,
like a lake free of mud.
For him
     — Such —
there's no traveling on.

Calm is his mind,
calm his speech
  & his deed:
one who's released through right knowing,
  pacified,
  Such.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
95
For someone as hard to offend as the earth, as firm in his spiritual vows as a rock, as free of dirt as a lake, there is no more wandering in samsara.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 95 Such a one who does his duty is tolerant like the earth, like Indra's bolt; he is like a lake without mud; no new births are in store for him.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 95
Such a one, who is not obstructed, just like the earth, who is similar to the Indra's stake, who is virtuous,
who is like a lake without mud - for such a one there is no more round of rebirth. [DLMBSFn-V095]
Dhammapada Dhp. 096
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
96. Santaṃ tassa manaṃ hoti santā vācā ca kamma ca
Sammadaññā vimuttassa upasantassa tādino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
96. Santaṃ tassa manaṃ hoti, santā vācā ca kamma ca;
Sammadaññā vimuttassa, upasantassa tādino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

CALM ARE THE PEACEFUL

  1. Calm is his mind, calm is his speech, calm is his action, who, rightly knowing, is wholly freed, [NāradaFn07-14] perfectly peaceful, [NāradaFn07-15] and equipoised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 96. Calm is his thought, calm his speech, and calm his deed, who, truly knowing, is wholly freed, perfectly tranquil and wise.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

94-96 [ThaniSFn-V94] , [ThaniSFn-V95]

He whose senses are steadied
  like stallions
well-trained by the charioteer,
his conceit abandoned,
  free of effluent,
  Such:
even devas adore him.

Like the earth, he doesn't react —
  cultured,
  Such,
like Indra's pillar,
like a lake free of mud.
For him
     — Such —
there's no traveling on.

Calm is his mind,
calm his speech
  & his deed:
one who's released through right knowing,
  pacified,
  Such.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

96

Those who are
          peaceful in mind;
          peaceful in speech;
          peaceful in conduct;
          freed through perfect insight:
such ones are utterly peaceful.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 96 His thought is quiet, quiet are his word and deed, when he has obtained freedom by true knowledge, when he has thus become a quiet man.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 96
Peaceful is his mind; peaceful are his speech and deeds –
of such a one, who is freed by the right knowledge and tranquil. [DLMBSFn-V096]
Dhammapada Dhp. 097
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
97. Assaddho akataññū ca sandhicchedo ca yo naro
Hatāvakāso vantāso sa ve uttamaporiso.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
97. Assaddho akataññū ca, sandhicchedo ca yo naro;
Hatāvakāso vantāso, sa ve uttamaporiso.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NOBLE IS HE WHO IS NOT CREDULOUS

  1. [NāradaFn07-16] The man who is not credulous, [NāradaFn07-17] who understands the Uncreate [NāradaFn07-18] (Nibbāna), who has cut off the links, [NāradaFn07-19] who has put an end to occasion [NāradaFn07-20] (of good and evil), who has eschewed [NāradaFn07-21] all desires, [NāradaFn07-22] he indeed, is a supreme man.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 97. The man who is without blind faith, who knows the Uncreated, who has severed all links, destroyed all causes (for karma, good and evil), and thrown out all desires — he, truly, is the most excellent of men. [BudRkFn-v97]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

97 [ThaniSFn-V97]

         The man
     faithless / beyond conviction
  ungrateful / knowing the Unmade
     a burglar / who has severed connections
     who's destroyed
  his chances / conditions
who eats vomit: / has disgorged expectations:
     the ultimate person.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

97

A person
          who is not credulous;
          who knows the unconditioned;
          who has broken all fetters;
          who has destroyed the possibility of rebirth;
          who has eliminated passion;
is the greatest of persons.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 97 The man who is free from credulity, but knows the uncreated, who has cut all ties, removed all temptations, renounced all desires, he is the greatest of men.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 97
A man who is not blindly trusting, who knows the Nirvana, who has broken the connections,
who has cut off the opportunities and who has given up all wishes - he is a greatest person indeed. [DLMBSFn-V097]
Dhammapada Dhp. 098
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
98. Gāme vā yadi vā raññe ninne vā yadi vā thale
Yatthārahanto viharanti taṃ bhūviṃ rāmaṇeyyakaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
98. Gāme vā yadi vāraññe, ninne vā yadi vā thale;
Yattha arahanto viharanti, taṃ bhūmirāmaṇeyyakaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DELIGHTFUL IS THE SPOT WHERE ARAHANTS DWELL

  1. Whether in village or in forest in vale or on hill, [NāradaFn07-23] wherever Arahants dwell - delightful, indeed, is that spot.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 98. Inspiring, indeed, is that place where Arahants dwell, be it a village, a forest, a vale, or a hill.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

98

In village or wilds,
valley, plateau:
that place is delightful
where arahants dwell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
98
Wherever an arahant chooses to stay,
High on a mountain, or down on the plain,
Whether in village or quiet forestation,
Delightful indeed is that lovely location.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 98 In a hamlet or in a forest, in the deep water or on the dry land, wherever venerable persons (Arhanta) dwell, that place is delightful.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 98
In the village or in the forest, in the valley or on the hill -
wherever Arahants live, that place is pleasant. [DLMBSFn-V098]
Dhammapada Dhp. 099
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
99. Ramaṇīyāni araññāni yattha na ramatī jano
Vītarāgā ramissanti na te kāmagavesino.

Arahantavaggo sattamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
99. Ramaṇīyāni araññāni, yattha na ramatī jano;
Vītarāgā ramissanti, na te kāmagavesino.

Arahantavaggo sattamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DELIGHTFUL ARE THE FORESTS TO THE PASSIONLESS

  1. Delightful are the forests where worldlings delight not; the passionless [NāradaFn07-24] will rejoice (therein), (for) they seek no sensual pleasures.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 99. Inspiring are the forests in which worldlings find no pleasure. There the passionless will rejoice, for they seek no sensual pleasures.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

99

Delightful wilds
where the crowds don't delight,
those free from passion
  delight,
for they're not searching
for sensual pleasures.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
99
Delightful indeed is that wild forestation
Where commonplace people find no titillation.
There, passionless men find a quiet delectation,
For they are not thirsting for sense stimulation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 99 Forests are delightful; where the world finds no delight, there the passionless will find delight, for they look not for pleasures.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 99
Delightful are the forests, where the crowd doesn't find delight.
Those free of passion will find delight there. They are not seeking pleasures. [DLMBSFn-V099]
Dhammapada Dhp. 100
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Sahassavaggo.
100. Sahassampi ce vācā anatthapadasaṃhitā
Ekaṃ atthapadaṃ seyyo yaṃ sutvā upasammati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

8. Sahassavaggo

100. Sahassamapi ce vācā, anatthapadasaṃhitā;
Ekaṃ atthapadaṃ seyyo, yaṃ sutvā upasammati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 8 Thousands

ONE USEFUL SENTENCE IS BETTER THAN A THOUSAND USELESS WORDS

  1. Better than a thousand utterances, comprising useless words, is one single beneficial word, by hearing which one is pacified.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp VIII The Thousands

100. Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, hearing which one attains peace.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp VIII Thousands

100-102 [ThaniSFn-V100]

  Better
than if there were thousands
of meaningless words is
  one
  meaningful
  word
that on hearing
brings peace.

  Better
than if there were thousands
of meaningless verses is
  one
  meaningful
  verse
that on hearing
brings peace.

And better than chanting hundreds
of meaningless verses is
  one
  Dhamma-saying
that on hearing
brings peace.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 8 Thousands

100
It’s better than a thousand sayings,
All of worthless words comprised,
A single word that’s full of substance,
Hearing which, one’s pacified.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter VIII: The Thousands

100 Even though a speech be a thousand (of words), but made up of senseless words, one word of sense is better, which if a man hears, he becomes quiet.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 8: The Thousand

DhP 100
Rather then a thousand speeches without meaningful words,
is better one meaningful word, after hearing which, one can attain calm. [DLMBSFn-V100]
Dhammapada Dhp. 101
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
101. Sahassampi ce gāthā antthapadasaṃhitā
Ekaṃ gāthāpadaṃ seyyā yaṃ sutvā upasammati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
101. Sahassamapi ce gāthā, anatthapadasaṃhitā;
Ekaṃ gāthāpadaṃ seyyo, yaṃ sutvā upasammati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE USEFUL VERSE IS BETTER THAN A THOUSAND USELESS VERSES

  1. Better than a thousand verses, comprising useless words, is one beneficial single line, by hearing which one is pacified.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 101. Better than a thousand useless verses is one useful verse, hearing which one attains peace.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

100-102 [ThaniSFn-V100]

  Better
than if there were thousands
of meaningless words is
  one
  meaningful
  word
that on hearing
brings peace.

  Better
than if there were thousands
of meaningless verses is
  one
  meaningful
  verse
that on hearing
brings peace.

And better than chanting hundreds
of meaningless verses is
  one
  Dhamma-saying
that on hearing
brings peace.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
101
It’s better than a thousand verses,
All of useless words comprised,
A single line that’s full of substance,
Hearing which, one’s pacified.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 101 Even though a Gatha (poem) be a thousand (of words), but made up of senseless words, one word of a Gatha is better, which if a man hears, he becomes quiet.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 101
Rather then a thousand verses without meaningful words,
is better one word of a verse, after hearing which, one can attain calm. [DLMBSFn-V101]
Dhammapada Dhp. 102
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
102. Yo ce gāthāsataṃ bhāse anatthapadasaṃhitaṃ
Ekaṃ dhammapadaṃ seyyā yaṃ sutvā upasammati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
102. Yo ca gāthā sataṃ bhāse, anatthapadasaṃhitā [anatthapadasañhitaṃ (ka.) visesanaṃ hetaṃ gāthātipadassa];
Ekaṃ dhammapadaṃ seyyo, yaṃ sutvā upasammati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BETTER THAN A HUNDRED USELESS WORDS IS ONE WORD OF THE DHAMMA. SELF-CONQUEST IS THE BEST OF ALL CONQUESTS

  1. Should one recite a hundred verses, comprising useless words, better is one single word of the Dhamma, by hearing which one is pacified.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 102. Better than reciting a hundred meaningless verses is the reciting of one verse of Dhamma, hearing which one attains peace.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

100-102 [ThaniSFn-V100]

  Better
than if there were thousands
of meaningless words is
  one
  meaningful
  word
that on hearing
brings peace.

  Better
than if there were thousands
of meaningless verses is
  one
  meaningful
  verse
that on hearing
brings peace.

And better than chanting hundreds
of meaningless verses is
  one
  Dhamma-saying
that on hearing
brings peace.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
102
It’s better than a hundred verses,
All of worthless words comprised,
A single line composed on Dhamma,
Hearing which, one’s pacified.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 102 Though a man recite a hundred Gathas made up of senseless words, one word of the law is better, which if a man hears, he becomes quiet.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 102
Who should say even a hundred verses without meaningful words,
better is one verse on the Dharma, after hearing which, one can attain calm. [DLMBSFn-V102]
Dhammapada Dhp. 103
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
103. Yo sahassaṃ sahassena saṅgāme mānuse jine
Ekañca jeyya attānaṃ sa ve saṅgāmajuttamo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
103. Yo sahassaṃ sahassena, saṅgāme mānuse jine;
Ekañca jeyyamattānaṃ [attānaṃ (sī. pī.)], sa ve saṅgāmajuttamo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Though one should conquer a million [NāradaFn08-03] men in battlefield, yet he, indeed, is the noblest victor who has conquered himself.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 103. Though one may conquer a thousand times a thousand men in battle, yet he indeed is the noblest victor who conquers himself.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

103-105

Greater in battle
than the man who would conquer
a thousand-thousand men,
is he who would conquer
just one —
     himself.

Better to conquer yourself
  than others.
When you've trained yourself,
living in constant self-control,
neither a deva nor gandhabba,
nor a Mara banded with Brahmas,
could turn that triumph
back into defeat.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
103
A single maid in battle
Against a million might prevail;
But she who quells just one, herself,
Indeed’s a victor non-pareil.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 103 If one man conquer in battle a thousand times thousand men, and if another conquer himself, he is the greatest of conquerors.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 103
If one should conquer thousands of people in the battle,
and if one should conquer just one thing - himself, he indeed is the victor of the highest battle. [DLMBSFn-V103]
Dhammapada Dhp. 104
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
104. Attā have jitaṃ seyyo yā cāyaṃ itarā pajā
Attadantassa posassa niccaṃ saññatacārino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
104. Attā have jitaṃ seyyo, yā cāyaṃ itarā pajā;
Attadantassa posassa, niccaṃ saññatacārino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE RATHER A VICTOR OF YOURSELF THAN A VICTOR OF OTHERS.  NONE CAN TURN INTO DEFEAT SELF-VICTORY

104-105. Self-conquest [NāradaFn08-04] is, indeed, far greater than the conquest of all other folk; neither a god nor a gandhabba, [NāradaFn08-05] nor Māra [NāradaFn08-06] with Brahmā, [NāradaFn08-07] can win back the victory of such a person who is self-subdued and ever lives in restraint.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 104-105. Self-conquest is far better than the conquest of others. Not even a god, an angel, Mara or Brahma can turn into defeat the victory of a person who is self-subdued and ever restrained in conduct. [BudRkFn-v104]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

103-105

Greater in battle
than the man who would conquer
a thousand-thousand men,
is he who would conquer
just one —
     himself.

Better to conquer yourself
  than others.
When you've trained yourself,
living in constant self-control,
neither a deva nor gandhabba,
nor a Mara banded with Brahmas,
could turn that triumph
back into defeat.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
104a
To conquer oneself is a genuine coup,
Better than anyone else to subdue.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 104, 105. One's own self conquered is better than all other people; not even a god, a Gandharva, not Mara with Brahman could change into defeat the victory of a man who has vanquished himself, and always lives under restraint.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 104
It is better to conquer oneself than to conquer other people.
Of a person, who tamed himself, who is always acting with self-control,
[Continued in DhP 105] [DLMBSFn-V104]
Dhammapada Dhp. 105
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
105. Neva devo na gandhabbo na māro saha brahmunā
Jitaṃ apajitaṃ kayirā tathārūpassa jantuno.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
105. Neva devo na gandhabbo, na māro saha brahmunā;
Jitaṃ apajitaṃ kayirā, tathārūpassa jantuno.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE RATHER A VICTOR OF YOURSELF THAN A VICTOR OF OTHERS.  NONE CAN TURN INTO DEFEAT SELF-VICTORY

104-105. Self-conquest [NāradaFn08-04] is, indeed, far greater than the conquest of all other folk; neither a god nor a gandhabba, [NāradaFn08-05] nor Māra [NāradaFn08-06] with Brahmā, [NāradaFn08-07] can win back the victory of such a person who is self-subdued and ever lives in restraint.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 104-105. Self-conquest is far better than the conquest of others. Not even a god, an angel, Mara or Brahma can turn into defeat the victory of a person who is self-subdued and ever restrained in conduct. [BudRkFn-v104]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

103-105

Greater in battle
than the man who would conquer
a thousand-thousand men,
is he who would conquer
just one —
     himself.

Better to conquer yourself
  than others.
When you've trained yourself,
living in constant self-control,
neither a deva nor gandhabba,
nor a Mara banded with Brahmas,
could turn that triumph
back into defeat.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
104b-105
For those who are tamed,
In all conduct restrained,
Not a god or gandhabba,
Not Mara or Brahma
The victory unmakes
Of those having such traits.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 104, 105. One's own self conquered is better than all other people; not even a god, a Gandharva, not Mara with Brahman could change into defeat the victory of a man who has vanquished himself, and always lives under restraint.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 105
[continued from DhP 104]
not a god, not a Gandharva, not Mara with Brahma,
can turn into defeat the victory of a person of such form. [DLMBSFn-V105]
Dhammapada Dhp. 106
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
106. Māse māse sahassena yo yajetha sataṃ samaṃ
Ekañca bhāvitattānaṃ muhuttampi pūjaye
Sā yeva pūjanā seyyā yañce vassasataṃ hutaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
106. Māse māse sahassena, yo yajetha sataṃ samaṃ;
Ekañca bhāvitattānaṃ, muhuttamapi pūjaye;
Sāyeva pūjanā seyyo, yañce vassasataṃ hutaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A MOMENT'S HONOUR TO THE WORTHY IS BETTER THAN LONG CONTINUED HONOUR TO THE UNWORTHY

  1. Though month after month with a thousand, one should make an offering for a hundred years, yet, if, only for a moment, one should honour (a Saint) who has perfected himself - that honour is, indeed, better than a century of sacrifice.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 106. Though month after month for a hundred years one should offer sacrifices by the thousands, yet if only for a moment one should worship those of perfected minds that honor is indeed better than a century of sacrifice.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

106-108

You could, month by month,
  at a cost of thousands,
conduct sacrifices
  a hundred times,
     or
pay a single moment's homage
  to one person,
  self-cultivated.
Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
would that act of homage be.
You could, for a hundred years,
live in a forest
  tending a fire,
     or
pay a single moment's homage
  to one person,
  self-cultivated.
Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
would that act of homage be.
Everything offered
or sacrificed in the world
for an entire year by one seeking merit
doesn't come to a fourth.
  Better to pay respect
  to those who've gone
  the straight way.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
106
Though month after month for a century
One did thousands of favours for charity,
Then, if one revered momentarily
A person who’d trained himself inwardly,
Then that would have more moral potency
Than that century of favours for charity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 106 If a man for a hundred years sacrifice month after month with a thousand, and if he but for one moment pay homage to a man whose soul is grounded (in true knowledge), better is that homage than sacrifice for a hundred years.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 106
If one should sacrifice every month thousand times even by hundreds,
and if one should even for a moment pay respects to somebody, who has developed himself,
then such a devotion is better than hundred years of sacrifice. [DLMBSFn-V106]
Dhammapada Dhp. 107
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
107. Yo ca vassasataṃ jantu aggiṃ paricare vane
Ekañca bhāvitattānaṃ muhuttampi pūjaye
Sā yeva pūjanā seyyā yañce vassasataṃ hutaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
107. Yo ca vassasataṃ jantu, aggiṃ paricare vane;
Ekañca bhāvitattānaṃ, muhuttamapi pūjaye;
Sāyeva pūjanā seyyo, yañce vassasataṃ hutaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A MOMENT'S HONOUR TO THE PURE IS BETTER THAN A CENTURY OF FIRE-SACRIFICE

  1. Though, for a century a man should tend the (sacred) fire in the forest, yet, if, only for a moment, he should honour (a Saint) who has perfected himself - that honour is, indeed, better than a century of fire-sacrifice.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 107. Though for a hundred years one should tend the sacrificial fire in the forest, yet if only for a moment one should worship those of perfected minds, that worship is indeed better than a century of sacrifice.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

106-108

You could, month by month,
  at a cost of thousands,
conduct sacrifices
  a hundred times,
     or
pay a single moment's homage
  to one person,
  self-cultivated.
Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
would that act of homage be.
You could, for a hundred years,
live in a forest
  tending a fire,
     or
pay a single moment's homage
  to one person,
  self-cultivated.
Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
would that act of homage be.
Everything offered
or sacrificed in the world
for an entire year by one seeking merit
doesn't come to a fourth.
  Better to pay respect
  to those who've gone
  the straight way.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
107
A man in the woods for a century
Might worship a fire reverentially;
Then, if he revered momentarily
A person who’d trained himself inwardly,
Then that would have more moral potency
Than that worship of fire for a century.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 107 If a man for a hundred years worship Agni (fire) in the forest, and if he but for one moment pay homage to a man whose soul is grounded (in true knowledge), better is that homage than sacrifice for a hundred years.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 107
Whatever person should worship fire in the forest for hundred years,
and if one should even for a moment pay respects to somebody, who has developed himself,
then such a devotion is better than hundred years of sacrifice. [DLMBSFn-V107]
Dhammapada Dhp. 108
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
108. Yaṃ kiñci yiṭṭhaṃ va hutaṃ va loke
Saṃvaccharaṃ yajetha puññapekkho
Sabbampi taṃ na catubhāgameti
Abhivādanā ujjugatesu seyyā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
108. Yaṃ kiñci yiṭṭhaṃ va hutaṃ va [yiṭṭhañca hutañca (ka.)] loke, saṃvaccharaṃ yajetha puññapekkho;
Sabbampi taṃ na catubhāgameti, abhivādanā ujjugatesu seyyo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BETTER THAN SACRIFICIAL SLAUGHTER OF ANIMALS IS HONOUR TO THE PURE ONES

  1. In this world whatever gift [NāradaFn08-08] or alms a person seeking merit should offer for a year, all that is not worth a single quarter of the reverence towards the Upright [NāradaFn08-09] which is excellent.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 108. Whatever gifts and oblations one seeking merit might offer in this world for a whole year, all that is not worth one fourth of the merit gained by revering the Upright Ones, which is truly excellent.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

106-108 [ThaniSFn-V108]

You could, month by month,
  at a cost of thousands,
conduct sacrifices
  a hundred times,
     or
pay a single moment's homage
  to one person,
  self-cultivated.
Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
would that act of homage be.
You could, for a hundred years,
live in a forest
  tending a fire,
     or
pay a single moment's homage
  to one person,
  self-cultivated.
Better than a hundred years of sacrifices
would that act of homage be.
Everything offered
or sacrificed in the world
for an entire year by one seeking merit
doesn't come to a fourth.
  Better to pay respect
  to those who've gone
  the straight way.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
108
For a year one might alms and oblations bestow,
Hoping for merit to make on this globe.
All that bestowing would little avail:
Homage to those who are upright prevails.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 108 Whatever a man sacrifice in this world as an offering or as an oblation for a whole year in order to gain merit, the whole of it is not worth a quarter (a farthing); reverence shown to the righteous is better.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 108
Whatever sacrifice or oblation in the world
might someone sacrifice in a year, looking for merit,
all that is not worth one fourth.
Showing respect to those of upright conduct is better. [DLMBSFn-V108]
Dhammapada Dhp. 109
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
109. Abhivādanasīlissa niccaṃ vaddhāpacāyino
Cattārā dhammā vaḍḍhanti āyu vaṇṇo sukhaṃ balaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
109. Abhivādanasīlissa, niccaṃ vuḍḍhāpacāyino [vaddhāpacāyino (sī. pī.)];
Cattāro dhammā vaḍḍhanti, āyu vaṇṇo sukhaṃ balaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BLESSED INDEED ARE THEY WHO HONOUR THOSE WORTHY OF HONOUR

  1. For one who is in the habit of constantly honouring and respecting the elders, four blessings increase - age, beauty, bliss, and strength.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 109. To one ever eager to revere and serve the elders, these four blessing accrue: long life and beauty, happiness and power.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

109

If you're respectful by habit,
constantly honoring the worthy,
four things increase:
  long life, beauty,
  happiness, strength.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
109
People who honour the morally pure,
Who always respect the disciples mature,
For them will develop the happy quaternity:
Beauty, longevity, joy and vitality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 109 He who always greets and constantly reveres the aged, four things will increase to him, viz. life, beauty, happiness, power.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 109
For somebody, who is showing respect to those of virtuous character, who is always paying homage to the venerable ones,
four things grow for him: life-span, beauty of complexion, happiness, strength. [DLMBSFn-V109]
Dhammapada Dhp. 110
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
110. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve dussīlo asamāhito
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo sīlavantassa jhāyino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
110. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve, dussīlo asamāhito;
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo, sīlavantassa jhāyino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A SHORT BUT VIRTUOUS LIFE IS BETTER THAN A LONG BUT IMMORAL LIFE

  1. Though one should live a hundred years, immoral and uncontrolled, yet better, indeed, is a single day's life of one who is moral and meditative.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 110. Better it is to live one day virtuous and meditative than to live a hundred years immoral and uncontrolled.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

110-115

Better than a hundred years
lived without virtue, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a virtuous person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived undiscerning, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a discerning person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived apathetic & unenergetic, is
  one day
lived energetic & firm.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
arising & passing away, is
  one day
lived seeing
arising & passing away.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the Deathless state, is
  one day
lived seeing
the Deathless state.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the ultimate Dhamma, is
  one day
lived seeing
the ultimate Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
110
A person might live for as long as a century,
With mind discomposed and imbued with iniquity:
Better the life of a day of integrity,
Training one’s mind and preserving morality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 110 But he who lives a hundred years, vicious and unrestrained, a life of one day is better if a man is virtuous and reflecting.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 110
Who would live for hundred years, with bad morality, without a firm mind,
better is the life for one day of somebody who is virtuous and meditating. [DLMBSFn-V110]
Dhammapada Dhp. 111
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
111. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve duppañño asamāhito
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo paññavantassa jhāyino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
111. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve, duppañño asamāhito;
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo, paññavantassa jhāyino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A BRIEF LIFE OF WISDOM IS BETTER THAN A LONG LIFE OF STUPIDITY

  1. Though one should live a hundred years without wisdom and control, yet better, indeed, is a single day's life of one who is wise and meditative.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 111. Better it is to live one day wise and meditative than to live a hundred years foolish and uncontrolled.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

110-115

Better than a hundred years
lived without virtue, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a virtuous person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived undiscerning, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a discerning person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived apathetic & unenergetic, is
  one day
lived energetic & firm.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
arising & passing away, is
  one day
lived seeing
arising & passing away.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the Deathless state, is
  one day
lived seeing
the Deathless state.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the ultimate Dhamma, is
  one day
lived seeing
the ultimate Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
111
A person might live for as long as a century,
With mind discomposed and imbued with stupidity:
Better the life of a day of integrity,
Training one’s mind and possessing sagacity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 111 And he who lives a hundred years, ignorant and unrestrained, a life of one day is better if a man is wise and reflecting.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 111
Who would live for hundred years, without wisdom, without a firm mind,
better is the life for one day of somebody who is wise and meditating. [DLMBSFn-V111]
Dhammapada Dhp. 112
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
112. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve kusīto hīnavīriyo
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo viriyamārabhato daḷhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
112. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve, kusīto hīnavīriyo;
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo, vīriyamārabhato daḷhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A BRIEF LIFE OF REFLECTION IS BETTER THAN A LONG LIFE OF NON-REFLECTION

  1. Though one should live a hundred years idle and inactive yet better, indeed, is a single day's life of one who makes an intense effort.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 112. Better it is to live one day strenuous and resolute than to live a hundred years sluggish and dissipated.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

110-115

Better than a hundred years
lived without virtue, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a virtuous person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived undiscerning, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a discerning person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived apathetic & unenergetic, is
  one day
lived energetic & firm.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
arising & passing away, is
  one day
lived seeing
arising & passing away.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the Deathless state, is
  one day
lived seeing
the Deathless state.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the ultimate Dhamma, is
  one day
lived seeing
the ultimate Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
112
A person might live for as long as a century,
Lazing about and depleted of energy:
Better the life of a day of integrity,
Rousing an effort and striving tenaciously.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 112 And he who lives a hundred years, idle and weak, a life of one day is better if a man has attained firm strength.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 112
Who would live for hundred years, indolent and of poor effort,
better is the life for one day of somebody who has undertaken a firm effort. [DLMBSFn-V112]
Dhammapada Dhp. 113
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
113. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve apassaṃ udayavyayaṃ
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo passato udayavyayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
113. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve, apassaṃ udayabbayaṃ;
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo, passato udayabbayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE DAY OF EXPERIENCING THE DEATHLESS IS BETTER THAN A CENTURY WITHOUT SUCH AN EXPERIENCE

  1. Though one should live a hundred years without comprehending how all things rise and pass away, [NāradaFn08-11] yet better, indeed, is a single day's life of one who comprehends how all things rise and pass away.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 113. Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

110-115

Better than a hundred years
lived without virtue, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a virtuous person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived undiscerning, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a discerning person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived apathetic & unenergetic, is
  one day
lived energetic & firm.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
arising & passing away, is
  one day
lived seeing
arising & passing away.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the Deathless state, is
  one day
lived seeing
the Deathless state.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the ultimate Dhamma, is
  one day
lived seeing
the ultimate Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
113

A person might live for as long as a century,
Blind to arising and ceasing activity:
Better the life of a day of integrity,
Marking the rising and ceasing duality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 113 And he who lives a hundred years, not seeing beginning and end, a life of one day is better if a man sees beginning and end.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 113
Who would live for hundred years, not seeing rise and fall of things,
better is the life for one day of somebody who is seeing their rise and fall. [DLMBSFn-V113]
Dhammapada Dhp. 114
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
114. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve apassaṃ amataṃ padaṃ
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo passato amataṃ padaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
114. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve, apassaṃ amataṃ padaṃ;
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo, passato amataṃ padaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE DAY OF PERCEIVING THE DEATHLESS IS BETTER THAN A CENTURY WITHOUT SUCH AN EXPERIENCE

  1. Though one should live a hundred years without seeing the Deathless State, [NāradaFn08-12] yet better, indeed, is a single day's life of one who sees the Deathless State.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 114. Better it is to live one day seeing the Deathless than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the Deathless.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

110-115

Better than a hundred years
lived without virtue, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a virtuous person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived undiscerning, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a discerning person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived apathetic & unenergetic, is
  one day
lived energetic & firm.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
arising & passing away, is
  one day
lived seeing
arising & passing away.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the Deathless state, is
  one day
lived seeing
the Deathless state.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the ultimate Dhamma, is
  one day
lived seeing
the ultimate Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
114
A person might live for as long as a century,
Failing to find the immortal sublimity:
Better the life of a day of integrity,
One that is blessed with the deathless epiphany.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 114 And he who lives a hundred years, not seeing the immortal place, a life of one day is better if a man sees the immortal place.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 114
Who would live for hundred years, not seeing the state of deathlessness,
better is the life for one day of somebody who is seeing the state of deathlessness. [DLMBSFn-V114]
Dhammapada Dhp. 115
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
115. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve apassaṃ dhammamuttamaṃ
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo passato dhammamuttamaṃ.

Sahassavaggo aṭṭhamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
115. Yo ca vassasataṃ jīve, apassaṃ dhammamuttamaṃ;
Ekāhaṃ jīvitaṃ seyyo, passato dhammamuttamaṃ.

Sahassavaggo aṭṭhamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE DAY OF PERCEIVING THE DHAMMA IS BETTER THAN A CENTURY WITHOUT SUCH PERCEPTION

  1. Though one should live a hundred years not seeing the Truth Sublime, [NāradaFn08-13] yet better, indeed, is a single day's life of one who sees the Truth Sublime.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 115. Better it is to live one day seeing the Supreme Truth than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the Supreme Truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

110-115

Better than a hundred years
lived without virtue, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a virtuous person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived undiscerning, uncentered, is
  one day
lived by a discerning person
absorbed in jhana.
And better than a hundred years
lived apathetic & unenergetic, is
  one day
lived energetic & firm.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
arising & passing away, is
  one day
lived seeing
arising & passing away.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the Deathless state, is
  one day
lived seeing
the Deathless state.
And better than a hundred years
lived without seeing
the ultimate Dhamma, is
  one day
lived seeing
the ultimate Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
115
A person might live for as long as a century,
Failing to find the most sacred reality:
Better the life of a day of integrity,
Coming upon that unparalleled sanctity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 115 And he who lives a hundred years, not seeing the highest law, a life of one day is better if a man sees the highest law.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 115
Who would live for hundred years, not seeing the highest Law,
better is the life for one day of somebody who is seeing the highest Law. [DLMBSFn-V115]
Dhammapada Dhp. 116
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Pāpavaggo.
116. Abhitvaretha* kalyāṇe pāpā cittaṃ nivāraye
Dandhaṃ hi karoto puññaṃ pāpasmiṃ ramatī mano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

9. Pāpavaggo

116. Abhittharetha kalyāṇe, pāpā cittaṃ nivāraye;
Dandhañhi karoto puññaṃ, pāpasmiṃ ramatī mano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 9 Evil

BE QUICK IN DOING GOOD; SUPPRESS EVIL

  1. Make haste in doing good; [NāradaFn09-01] check your mind from evil; [NāradaFn09-02] for the mind of him who is slow in doing meritorious actions [NāradaFn09-03] delights in evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp IX Evil

116. Hasten to do good; restrain your mind from evil. He who is slow in doing good, his mind delights in evil.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp IX Evil

116

Be quick in doing
what's admirable.
Restrain your mind
from what's evil.
When you're slow
in making merit,
evil delights the mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 9 Evil

116
Lose not a moment in doing things virtuous;
Hold your mind back from whatever’s iniquitous.
They who delay taking up what is righteous,
Their minds take delight in the doing of wickedness.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter IX: Evil

116 If a man would hasten towards the good, he should keep his thought away from evil; if a man does what is good slothfully, his mind delights in evil.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 9: The Evil

DhP 116
You should be quick in doing good. One should restrain mind from evil.
The mind of somebody, who is slow in doing good, delights in evil. [DLMBSFn-V116]
Dhammapada Dhp. 117
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
117. Pāpaṃ ce puriso kayirā na taṃ kayirā punappunaṃ
Na tamhi chandaṃ kayirātha dukkho pāpassa uccayo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
117. Pāpañce puriso kayirā, na naṃ [na taṃ (sī. pī.)] kayirā punappunaṃ;
Na tamhi chandaṃ kayirātha, dukkho pāpassa uccayo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DO NO EVIL AGAIN AND AGAIN

  1. Should a person commit evil, he should not do it again and again; he should not find pleasure therein: painful is the accumulation of evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 117. Should a person commit evil, let him not do it again and again. Let him not find pleasure therein, for painful is the accumulation of evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

117-118

If a person does evil,
he shouldn't do it again & again,
shouldn't develop a penchant for it.
To accumulate evil
  brings pain.

If a person makes merit,
he should do it again & again,
should develop a penchant for it.
To accumulate merit
  brings ease.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
117
Should a lass some evil wreak,
She should not that slip repeat,
Nor should set her heart upon it:
Hoarding evil’s vitriolic.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 117 If a man commits a sin, let him not do it again; let him not delight in sin: pain is the outcome of evil.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 117
Should a person do evil, let him not do it again and again.
One should not wish for it. Accumulation of evil is painful. [DLMBSFn-V117]
Dhammapada Dhp. 118
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
118. Puññaṃ ce puriso kayirā kayirāthetaṃ punappunaṃ
Tamhi chandaṃ kayirātha sukho puññassa uccayo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
118. Puññañce puriso kayirā, kayirā naṃ [kayirāthetaṃ (sī. syā.), kayirāthenaṃ (pī.)] punappunaṃ;
Tamhi chandaṃ kayirātha, sukho puññassa uccayo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DO GOOD AGAIN AND AGAIN

  1. Should a person perform a meritorious action, he should do it again and again; he should find pleasure therein: blissful is the accumulation of merit.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 118. Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. Let him find pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumulation of good.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

117-118

If a person does evil,
he shouldn't do it again & again,
shouldn't develop a penchant for it.
To accumulate evil
  brings pain.

If a person makes merit,
he should do it again & again,
should develop a penchant for it.
To accumulate merit
  brings ease.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
118
If a deed is philanthropic,
She should set her heart upon it,
Ever trying to do it more:
It’s blissful having merit stored.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 118 If a man does what is good, let him do it again; let him delight in it: happiness is the outcome of good.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 118
Should a person do good, let him do it again and again.
One should wish for it. Accumulation of good is pleasant. [DLMBSFn-V118]
Dhammapada Dhp. 119
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
119. Pāpo'pi passati bhadraṃ yāva pāpaṃ na paccati
Yadā ca paccati pāpaṃ atha pāpo pāpāni passati
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
119. Pāpopi passati bhadraṃ, yāva pāpaṃ na paccati;
Yadā ca paccati pāpaṃ, atha pāpo pāpāni [atha pāpāni (?)] passati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BY ITS EFFECTS EVIL IS KNOWN   BY ITS EFFECTS GOOD IS KNOWN

  1. Even an evil-doer sees good as long as evil ripens not; but when it bears fruit, then he sees the evil results. [NāradaFn09-04]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 119. It may be well with the evil-doer as long as the evil ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the evil-doer sees (the painful results of) his evil deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

119-120

Even the evil
meet with good fortune
as long as their evil
has yet to mature.
But when it's matured
that's when they meet
  with evil.

Even the good
meet with bad fortune
as long as their good
has yet to mature.
But when it's matured
that's when they meet
  with good fortune.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
119
A villain sees good luck, perhaps,
Until the yield of evil’s hatched.
Come the evil deed’s maturity,
Then the villain meets with villainy.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 119 Even an evil-doer sees happiness as long as his evil deed has not ripened; but when his evil deed has ripened, then does the evil-doer see evil.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 119
An evil person may even see goodness [in his evil deeds] as long as the evil has not ripened.
When the evil has ripened, then the evil person sees those evil deeds. [DLMBSFn-V119]
Dhammapada Dhp. 120
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
120. Bhadro'pi passati pāpaṃ yāva bhadraṃ na paccati
Yadā ca paccati bhadraṃ atha bhadro bhadrāni passati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
120. Bhadropi passati pāpaṃ, yāva bhadraṃ na paccati;
Yadā ca paccati bhadraṃ, atha bhadro bhadrāni [atha bhadrāni (?)] passati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Even a good person sees evil so long as good ripens not; but when it bears fruit then the good one sees the good results. [NāradaFn09-05]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 120. It may be ill with the doer of good as long as the good ripens not. But when it does ripen, then the doer of good sees (the pleasant results of) his good deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

119-120

Even the evil
meet with good fortune
as long as their evil
has yet to mature.
But when it's matured
that's when they meet
  with evil.

Even the good
meet with bad fortune
as long as their good
has yet to mature.
But when it's matured
that's when they meet
  with good fortune.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
120
The good have grievous luck, perhaps,
Until the yield of good is hatched;
But when their goodness comes to fullness,
Then the good discover goodness.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 120 Even a good man sees evil days, as long as his good deed has not ripened; but when his good deed has ripened, then does the good man see happy days.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 120
A good person may even see evil [in his good deeds] as long as the goodness has not ripened.
When the goodness has ripened, then the good person sees those good deeds. [DLMBSFn-V120]
Dhammapada Dhp. 121
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
121. Mā'pamaññetha pāpassa na mantaṃ āgamissati
Udabindunipātena udakumbho'pi pūrati
Pūrati bālo pāpassa thokathokampi ācinaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
121. Māvamaññetha [māppamaññetha (sī. syā. pī.)] pāpassa, na mantaṃ [na maṃ taṃ (sī. pī.), na mattaṃ (syā.)] āgamissati;
Udabindunipātena, udakumbhopi pūrati;
Bālo pūrati [pūrati bālo (sī. ka.), āpūrati bālo (syā.)] pāpassa, thokaṃ thokampi [thoka thokampi (sī. pī.)] ācinaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THINK NOT LIGHTLY OF EVIL

  1. Do not disregard evil, saying, "It will not come nigh unto me"; by the falling of drops even a water-jar is filled; likewise the fool, gathering little by little, fills himself with evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 121. Think not lightly of evil, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the fool, gathering it little by little, fills himself with evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

121-122 [ThaniSFn-V121-122]

Don't underestimate evil
('It won't amount to much').
A water jar fills,
even with water
falling     in     drops.
With evil — even if
   bit
      by
         bit,
      habitually —
the fool fills himself full.

Don't underestimate merit
('It won't amount to much').
A water jar fills,
even with water
falling     in     drops.
With merit — even if
   bit
      by
         bit,
      habitually —
the enlightened one fills himself full.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
121
Don’t underate iniquity
And think “Its fruits won’t come to me!”
Water falling drop by drop
Will fill an earthen waterpot.
And, likewise, fools by small degrees
Pervade themselves with villainy.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 121 Let no man think lightly of evil, saying in his heart, It will not come nigh unto me. Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot is filled; the fool becomes full of evil, even if he gather it little by little.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 121
Do not disregard evil, "It will not come to me!"
Falling drops of water can fill up even a water jar.
The fool fills himself up with evil, even if collecting it just little by little. [DLMBSFn-V121]
Dhammapada Dhp. 122
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
122. Mā'pamaññetha puññassa na maṃ taṃ āgamissati
Udabindunipātena udakumbho'pi pūrati
Pūrati dhīro puññassa thokathokampi ācinaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
122. Māvamaññetha puññassa, na mantaṃ āgamissati;
Udabindunipātena, udakumbhopi pūrati;
Dhīro pūrati puññassa, thokaṃ thokampi ācinaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THINK NOT LIGHTLY OF GOOD

  1. Do not disregard merit, saying "It will not come nigh unto me"; by the falling of drops even a water-jar is filled; likewise the wise man, gathering little by little, fills himself with good.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 122. Think not lightly of good, saying, "It will not come to me." Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by little, fills himself with good.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

121-122 [ThaniSFn-V121-122]

Don't underestimate evil
('It won't amount to much').
A water jar fills,
even with water
falling     in     drops.
With evil — even if
   bit
      by
         bit,
      habitually —
the fool fills himself full.

Don't underestimate merit
('It won't amount to much').
A water jar fills,
even with water
falling     in     drops.
With merit — even if
   bit
      by
         bit,
      habitually —
the enlightened one fills himself full.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
122
Don’t underate philanthropy
And think “Its fruits won’t come to me!”
Water falling drop by drop
Will fill an earthen waterpot.
So the wise will bit by bit
Pervade themselves with benefit.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 122 Let no man think lightly of good, saying in his heart, It will not come nigh unto me. Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot is filled; the wise man becomes full of good, even if he gather it little by little.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 122
Do not disregard goodness, "It will not come to me!"
Falling drops of water can fill up even a water jar.
The clever one fills himself up with goodness, even if collecting it just little by little. [DLMBSFn-V122]
Dhammapada Dhp. 123
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
123. Vāṇijo'va bhayaṃ maggaṃ appasattho mahaddhano
Visaṃ jīvitukāmo'va pāpāni parivajjaye.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
123. Vāṇijova bhayaṃ maggaṃ, appasattho mahaddhano;
Visaṃ jīvitukāmova, pāpāni parivajjaye.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SHUN EVIL LIKE A PERILOUS PATH

  1. Just as a merchant, with a small escort and great wealth, avoids a perilous route, just as one desiring to live avoids poison, even so should one shun evil things.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 123. Just as a trader with a small escort and great wealth would avoid a perilous route, or just as one desiring to live avoids poison, even so should one shun evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

123

Like a merchant with a small
but well-laden caravan
         — a dangerous road,
like a person who loves life
         — a poison,
one should avoid
         — evil deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
123
With precious goods but escort frail
A trader shuns a risky trail.
And not desiring suicide
A man would keep from cyanide.
With just the same solicitude
A man should shy from turpitude.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 123 Let a man avoid evil deeds, as a merchant, if he has few companions and carries much wealth, avoids a dangerous road; as a man who loves life avoids poison.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 123
Like a merchant with a small caravan and a lot of money would avoid a dreadful path,
like someone who wants to live would avoid a poison, so should one avoid evil. [DLMBSFn-V123]
Dhammapada Dhp. 124
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
124. Pāṇimhi ce vaṇo nāssa hareyya pāṇinā visaṃ
Nābbaṇaṃ visamanveti natthi pāpaṃ akubbato.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
124. Pāṇimhi ce vaṇo nāssa, hareyya pāṇinā visaṃ;
Nābbaṇaṃ visamanveti, natthi pāpaṃ akubbato.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NO EVIL TO THOSE WHO HAVE NO BAD INTENTION

  1. If no wound there be in one's hand, one may carry poison in it. Poison does not affect one who has no wound. There is no ill for him who does no wrong. [NāradaFn09-07]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 124. If on the hand there is no wound, one may carry even poison in it. Poison does not affect one who is free from wounds. For him who does no evil, there is no ill.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

124

If there's no wound on the hand,
that hand can hold poison.
Poison won't penetrate
  where there's no wound.
There's no evil
  for those who don't do it.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
124
If his palm has no abrasion
Then a man can handle poison.
One whose hand from wounds is free,
Poison can’t cause injury:
One who’s free of wrong intention
Will not suffer retribution.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 124 He who has no wound on his hand, may touch poison with his hand; poison does not affect one who has no wound; nor is there evil for one who does not commit evil.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 124
If there is no wound in the palm, one can carry poison with it.
The poison does not affect one who is without a wound. There is no evil for one, who is not doing it. [DLMBSFn-V124]
Dhammapada Dhp. 125
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
125. Yo appaduṭṭhassa narassa dussati
Suddhassa posassa anaṅgaṇassa
Tameva bālaṃ pacceti pāpaṃ
Sukhumo rajo paṭivātaṃ'va khitto.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
125. .
Yo appaduṭṭhassa narassa dussati, suddhassa posassa anaṅgaṇassa;
Tameva bālaṃ pacceti pāpaṃ, sukhumo rajo paṭivātaṃva khitto.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

WHO HARMS THE INNOCENT COMES TO GRIEF

  1. Whoever harms a harmless person, one pure and guiltless, upon that very fool the evil recoils like fine dust thrown against the wind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 125. Like fine dust thrown against the wind, evil falls back upon that fool who offends an inoffensive, pure and guiltless man.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

125

Whoever harasses
an innocent man,
  a man pure, without blemish:
the evil comes right back to the fool
like fine dust
  thrown against the wind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
125
Whoever harms a person who is harmless,
A man of conduct pure, whose mind is stainless,
Back onto that fool
Will be that evil blown,
Like dusty soil rebounds,
If into wind it’s thrown.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 125 If a man offend a harmless, pure, and innocent person, the evil falls back upon that fool, like light dust thrown up against the wind.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 125
Who offends against an uncorrupted man, against a trusting and pure person,
the evil will fall back upon such a fool, like minute dust thrown against the wind. [DLMBSFn-V125]
Dhammapada Dhp. 126
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
126. Gabbhameke'papajjanti nirayaṃ pāpakammino
Saggaṃ sugatino yanti parinibbanti anāsavā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
126. Gabbhameke uppajjanti, nirayaṃ pāpakammino;
Saggaṃ sugatino yanti, parinibbanti anāsavā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BIRTH DEPENDS ON ACTIONS

  1. Some are born [NāradaFn09-08] in a womb; evil-doers (are born) in woeful states; [NāradaFn09-09] the well-conducted go to blissful states; [NāradaFn09-10] the Undefiled Ones [NāradaFn09-11] pass away into Nibbāna.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 126. Some are born in the womb; the wicked are born in hell; the devout go to heaven; the stainless pass into Nibbana.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

126 [ThaniSFn-V126]

Some are born   in the human womb,
evildoers       in hell,
those on the good course go

to heaven,
while those without effluent:

totally unbound.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
126
Some in wombs remanifest;
The wicked rise in hell’s abyss;
The good proceed to paradise;
The taintless find supreme release.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 126 Some people are born again; evil-doers go to hell; righteous people go to heaven; those who are free from all worldly desires attain Nirvana.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 126
Some are born in the womb; evildoers arise in hell;
righteous ones go to heaven; those without taints are completely emancipated. [DLMBSFn-V126]
Dhammapada Dhp. 127
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
127. Na antalikkhe na samuddamajajhe
Na pabbatānaṃ vivaraṃ pavissa
Na vijjatī so jagatippadeso
Yatthaṭthito mucceyya pāpakammā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
127. Na antalikkhe na samuddamajjhe, na pabbatānaṃ vivaraṃ pavissa [pavisaṃ (syā.)];
Na vijjatī [na vijjati (ka. sī. pī. ka.)] so jagatippadeso, yatthaṭṭhito [yatraṭṭhito (syā.)] mucceyya pāpakammā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NOBODY IS EXEMPT FROM THE EFFECTS OF EVIL KAMMA

  1. Not in the sky, nor in mid-ocean, nor in a mountain cave, is found that place on earth where abiding one may escape from (the consequences) of one's evil deed. [NāradaFn09-12]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 127. Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean, nor by entering into mountain clefts, nowhere in the world is there a place where one may escape from the results of evil deeds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

127-128

Not up in the air,
nor in the middle of the sea,
nor going into a cleft in the mountains
  — nowhere on earth —
is a spot to be found
where you could stay & escape
  your evil deed.

Not up in the air,
nor in the middle of the sea,
nor going into a cleft in the mountains
  — nowhere on earth —
is a spot to be found
where you could stay & not succumb
  to death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
127
Neither stratospheric space,
Nor the depths of ocean waste,
Nor the clefts on mountain-sides
Can a sanctuary provide
Where a man could hope to be
From results of evil, free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 127 Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known a spot in the whole world where a man might be freed from an evil deed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 127
Not in the air, not in the middle of the ocean, not entering the hole in the mountains.
There is no place in the world, where being one would be released from the [consequences of] evil deeds. [DLMBSFn-V127]
Dhammapada Dhp. 128
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
128. Na antalikkhe na samuddamajajhe
Na pabbatānaṃ vivaraṃ pavissa
Na vijjati so jagatippadeso
Yatthaṭthitaṃ nappasahetha maccu.

Pāpavaggo navamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
128. Na antalikkhe na samuddamajjhe, na pabbatānaṃ vivaraṃ pavissa;
Na vijjatī so jagatippadeso, yatthaṭṭhitaṃ [yatraṭṭhitaṃ (syā.)] nappasaheyya maccu.

Pāpavaggo navamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
DEATH CANNOT BE OVERCOME
  1. Not in the sky, nor in mid-ocean, nor in a mountain cave, is found that place on earth where abiding one will not be overcome by death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 128. Neither in the sky nor in mid-ocean, nor by entering into mountain clefts, nowhere in the world is there a place where one will not be overcome by death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

127-128

Not up in the air,
nor in the middle of the sea,
nor going into a cleft in the mountains
  — nowhere on earth —
is a spot to be found
where you could stay & escape
  your evil deed.

Not up in the air,
nor in the middle of the sea,
nor going into a cleft in the mountains
  — nowhere on earth —
is a spot to be found
where you could stay & not succumb
  to death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
128
Neither stratospheric space,
Nor the depths of ocean waste,
Nor the clefts on mountain-sides
Can a sanctuary provide
Where a man could hope to be
From assault of death be free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 128 Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known a spot in the whole world where death could not overcome (the mortal).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 128
Not in the air, not in the middle of the ocean, not entering the hole in the mountains.
There is no place in the world, where being, one would not be overcome by death. [DLMBSFn-V128]
Dhammapada Dhp. 129
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Daṇaḍavaggo.
129. Sabbe tasanti daṇaḍassa sabbe bhāyanti maccuno
Attānaṃ upamaṃ katvā na haneyya na ghātaye.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

10. Daṇḍavaggo

129. Sabbe tasanti daṇḍassa, sabbe bhāyanti maccuno;
Attānaṃ upamaṃ katvā, na haneyya na ghātaye.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 10 The Rod Or Punishment

KILL NOT

  1. All tremble at the rod. All fear death. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither strike nor cause to strike. [NāradaFn10-01]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp X Violence

129. All tremble at violence; all fear death. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp X The Rod

129-130
  All
tremble at the rod,
  all
are fearful of death.
Drawing the parallel to
  yourself,
neither kill nor get others to kill.

  All
tremble at the rod,
  all
hold their life dear.
Drawing the parallel to
  yourself,
neither kill nor get others to kill.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 10 The Stick

129
All shrink from flagellation,
And of death feel trepidation.
If we saw the correlation
To our parallel position,
We would stop all persecution
And, of creatures, violation. [VaradoFn-V129]
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter X: Punishment

129 All men tremble at punishment, all men fear death; remember that you are like unto them, and do not kill, nor cause slaughter.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 10: The Punishment

DhP 129
Everybody trembles at punishment; everybody fears death.
Having made the comparison with oneself, let one not kill, nor cause another to kill. [DLMBSFn-V129]
Dhammapada Dhp. 130
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
130. Sabbe tasanti daṇaḍassa sabbesaṃ jīvitaṃ piyaṃ
Attānaṃ upamaṃ katvā na haneyya na ghātaye.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
130. Sabbe tasanti daṇḍassa, sabbesaṃ jīvitaṃ piyaṃ;
Attānaṃ upamaṃ katvā, na haneyya na ghātaye.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LIFE IS DEAR TO ALL

  1. All tremble at the rod. Life is dear to all. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither strike nor cause to strike.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 130. All tremble at violence; life is dear to all. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

129-130

  All
tremble at the rod,
  all
are fearful of death.
Drawing the parallel to
  yourself,
neither kill nor get others to kill.

  All
tremble at the rod,
  all
hold their life dear.
Drawing the parallel to
  yourself,
neither kill nor get others to kill.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
130
All shrink from flagellation
Hold their lives in great affection.
If we saw the correlation
To our parallel position,
We would stop all persecution
And, of creatures, violation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 130 All men tremble at punishment, all men love life; remember that thou art like unto them, and do not kill, nor cause slaughter.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 130
Everybody trembles at punishment; life is dear to everybody.
Having made the comparison with oneself, let one not kill, nor cause another to kill. [DLMBSFn-V130]
Dhammapada Dhp. 131
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
131. Sukhakāmāni bhūtāni yodaṇḍena vihiṃsati
Attano sukhamesāno pecca so na labhate sukhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
131. Sukhakāmāni bhūtāni, yo daṇḍena vihiṃsati;
Attano sukhamesāno, pecca so na labhate sukhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

MOLEST NONE

  1. Whoever, seeking his own happiness, harms with the rod other pleasure-loving beings experiences no happiness hereafter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 131. One who, while himself seeking happiness, oppresses with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will not attain happiness hereafter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

131-132

Whoever takes a rod
to harm living beings desiring ease,
when he himself is looking for ease,
will meet with no ease after death.

Whoever doesn't take a rod
to harm living beings desiring ease,
when he himself is looking for ease,
will meet with ease after death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
131
Whoever attacks pleasure-loving beings, though himself longing for pleasure, will find no pleasure in his future life.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 131 He who seeking his own happiness punishes or kills beings who also long for happiness, will not find happiness after death.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 131
Who hurts with a stick beings that desire happiness,
searching for happiness himself, he will not reach happiness after death. [DLMBSFn-V131]
Dhammapada Dhp. 132
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
132. Sukhakāmāni bhūtāni yodaṇḍena na hiṃsati
Attano sukhamesāno pecca so labhate sukhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
132. Sukhakāmāni bhūtāni, yo daṇḍena na hiṃsati;
Attano sukhamesāno, pecca so labhate sukhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HARM NOT

  1. Whoever, seeking his own happiness, harms not with the rod other pleasure-loving beings, experiences happiness hereafter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 132. One who, while himself seeking happiness, does not oppress with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will find happiness hereafter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

131-132

Whoever takes a rod
to harm living beings desiring ease,
when he himself is looking for ease,
will meet with no ease after death.

Whoever doesn't take a rod
to harm living beings desiring ease,
when he himself is looking for ease,
will meet with ease after death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
132
Whoever does not attack pleasure-loving beings, and is one who himself longs for pleasure, will find pleasure in his future life.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 132 He who seeking his own happiness does not punish or kill beings who also long for happiness, will find happiness after death.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 132
Who does not hurt with a stick beings that desire happiness,
searching for happiness himself, he will reach happiness after death. [DLMBSFn-V132]
Dhammapada Dhp. 133
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
133. Mā'voca pharusaṃ kañci vuttā paṭivadeyyu taṃ
Dukkhā hi sārambhakathā paṭidaṇḍā phuseyyu taṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
133. Māvoca pharusaṃ kañci, vuttā paṭivadeyyu taṃ [paṭivadeyyuṃ taṃ (ka.)];
Dukkhā hi sārambhakathā, paṭidaṇḍā phuseyyu taṃ [phuseyyuṃ taṃ (ka.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SPEAK NOT HARSHLY

  1. Speak not harshly to anyone. Those thus addressed will retort. Painful, indeed, is vindictive speech. Blows in exchange may bruise you.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 133. Speak not harshly to anyone, for those thus spoken to might retort. Indeed, angry speech hurts, and retaliation may overtake you.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

133

Speak harshly to no one,
or the words will be thrown
  right back at you.
Contentious talk is painful,
for you get struck by rods in return.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
133
To no one speak offensively -
The victim might reciprocate.
Your angry words are agony:
Requital might eventuate.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 133 Do not speak harshly to anybody; those who are spoken to will answer thee in the same way. Angry speech is painful, blows for blows will touch thee.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 133
Do not say anything harsh, those spoken to might reply to that.
Angry talk is painful, retribution might be attached to it. [DLMBSFn-V133]
Dhammapada Dhp. 134
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
134. Sa ce neresi attānaṃ kaṃso upahato yathā
Esa patto'si nibbāṇaṃ sārambho te na vijjati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
134. Sace neresi attānaṃ, kaṃso upahato yathā;
Esa pattosi nibbānaṃ, sārambho te na vijjati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SILENCE YOURSELF

  1. If, like a cracked gong, you silence yourself, you have already attained Nibbāna: [NāradaFn10-02] no vindictiveness will be found in you.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 134. If, like a broken gong, you silence yourself, you have approached Nibbana, for vindictiveness is no longer in you.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

134

If, like a flattened metal pot
you don't resound,
you've attained an Unbinding;
in you there's found
no contention.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
134
Once you’ve no reverberation,
Like a fractured metal gong,
Then Nibbana have you realised:
Wars of words, for you, are gone.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 134 If, like a shattered metal plate (gong), thou utter not, then thou hast reached Nirvana; contention is not known to thee.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 134
If you yourself do not vibrate, just like a broken gong,
then you have reached Nirvana. Anger does not exist for you. [DLMBSFn-V134]
Dhammapada Dhp. 135
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
135. Yathā daṇḍena gopālo gā pāceti gocaraṃ
Evaṃ jarā ca maccu ca āyuṃ pācenti pāṇinaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
135. Yathā daṇḍena gopālo, gāvo pājeti gocaraṃ;
Evaṃ jarā ca maccu ca, āyuṃ pājenti pāṇinaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DECAY AND DEATH ARE UNIVERSAL

  1. As with a staff the herdsmen [NāradaFn10-03] drives his kine [NāradaFn10-04] to pasture, [NāradaFn10-05] even so do old age and death drive out the lives of beings.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 135. Just as a cowherd drives the cattle to pasture with a staff, so do old age and death drive the life force of beings (from existence to existence).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

135

As a cowherd with a rod
drives cows to the field,
so aging & death
drive the life
of living beings.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
135
Age-and-death the life from us expels
Like herd, with stick, his cows to grass compels.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 135 As a cowherd with his staff drives his cows into the stable, so do Age and Death drive the life of men.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 135
Just like a cowherd drives cows to pasture with a stick,
so old age and death drive the life of living beings. [DLMBSFn-V135]
Dhammapada Dhp. 136
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
136. Atha pāpāni kammāni karaṃ bālo na bujjhati
Sehi kammehi dummedho aggidaḍḍho'va tappati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
136. Atha pāpāni kammāni, karaṃ bālo na bujjhati;
Sehi kammehi dummedho, aggidaḍḍhova tappati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE EVIL-DOER IS CONSUMED BY THE EFFECT OF HIS OWN EVIL

  1. So, when a fool does wrong deeds, he does not realize (their evil nature); by his own deeds the stupid man is tormented, like one burnt by fire.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 136. When the fool commits evil deeds, he does not realize (their evil nature). The witless man is tormented by his own deeds, like one burnt by fire.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

136

When doing evil deeds,
the fool is oblivious.
The dullard
is tormented
by his own deeds,
as if burned by a fire.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
136
When evil’s done by those unwise,
Its harm they do not realise.
It’s like a very fire they light
By which they set themselves alight.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 136 A fool does not know when he commits his evil deeds: but the wicked man burns by his own deeds, as if burnt by fire.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 136
A fool does not realize when he is committing bad deeds.
The stupid person is tormented by his own deeds just as if burned by fire. [DLMBSFn-V136]
Dhammapada Dhp. 137
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
137. Yo daṇḍena adaṇḍesu appaduṭṭhesu dussati
Dasannamaññataraṃ ṭhānaṃ khippameva nigacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
137. Yo daṇḍena adaṇḍesu, appaduṭṭhesu dussati;
Dasannamaññataraṃ ṭhānaṃ, khippameva nigacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HE WHO OFFENDS THE INNOCENT COMES TO GRIEF

  1. He who with the rod harms the rodless and harmless, 6 soon will come to one of these states:
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 137. He who inflicts violence on those who are unarmed, and offends those who are inoffensive, will soon come upon one of these ten states:
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

137-140

  Whoever, with a rod,
  harasses an innocent man, unarmed,
  quickly falls into any of ten things:

harsh pains, devastation, a broken body, grave illness,
mental derangement, trouble with the government,
violent slander, relatives lost, property dissolved,
houses burned down.

  At the break-up of the body
  this one with no discernment,
  reappears in
  hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
137-140

A fool who might menace one morally upright,
Or using a cudgel a pure man should strike,
Would swiftly encounter a terrible plight:
Loss of relations;
Or racking sensations;
Or body calamity;
Loss of his sanity;
Terrible health;
Or the loss of his wealth;
Or his home’s devastation
In wild conflagration;
Or king, or authority,
Show him barbarity;
Then after death,
An infernal finality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 137 He who inflicts pain on innocent and harmless persons, will soon come to one of these ten states:
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 137
Who offends with a stick somebody who is uncorrupted and without violence,
he will quickly go to one of the ten states:
[continued in DhP 138] [DLMBSFn-V137]
Dhammapada Dhp. 138
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
138. Vedanaṃ pharusaṃ jāniṃ sarīrassa ca bhedanaṃ
Garukaṃ vāpi ābādhaṃ cittakkhepaṃ va pāpuṇe.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
138. Vedanaṃ pharusaṃ jāniṃ, sarīrassa ca bhedanaṃ [sarīrassa pabhedanaṃ (syā.)];
Garukaṃ vāpi ābādhaṃ, cittakkhepañca [cittakkhepaṃ va (sī. syā. pī.)] pāpuṇe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 138-140. He will be subject to acute pain, [NāradaFn10-07] disaster, bodily injury, or even grievous sickness, or loss of mind, or oppression by the king, or heavy accusation, or loss of relatives, or destruction of wealth, [NāradaFn10-08] or ravaging fire that will burn his house. Upon the dissolution of the body such unwise man will be born in hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 138-140. Sharp pain, or disaster, bodily injury, serious illness, or derangement of mind, trouble from the government, or grave charges, loss of relatives, or loss of wealth, or houses destroyed by ravaging fire; upon dissolution of the body that ignorant man is born in hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

137-140

  Whoever, with a rod,
  harasses an innocent man, unarmed,
  quickly falls into any of ten things:

harsh pains, devastation, a broken body, grave illness,
mental derangement, trouble with the government,
violent slander, relatives lost, property dissolved,
houses burned down.

  At the break-up of the body
  this one with no discernment,
  reappears in
  hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
137-140

A fool who might menace one morally upright,
Or using a cudgel a pure man should strike,
Would swiftly encounter a terrible plight:
Loss of relations;
Or racking sensations;
Or body calamity;
Loss of his sanity;
Terrible health;
Or the loss of his wealth;
Or his home’s devastation
In wild conflagration;
Or king, or authority,
Show him barbarity;
Then after death,
An infernal finality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 138 He will have cruel suffering, loss, injury of the body, heavy affliction, or loss of mind,
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 138
[continued from DhP 137]
He would get harsh pain, loss of property, and bodily injury,
serious illness, or derangement of mind.
[continued in DhP 139] [DLMBSFn-V138]
Dhammapada Dhp. 139
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
139. Rājato vā upassaggaṃ abbhakkhānaṃ va dāruṇaṃ
Parikkhayaṃ va ñātīnaṃ bhogānaṃ va pabhaṅguraṃ
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
139. Rājato vā upasaggaṃ [upassaggaṃ (sī. pī.)], abbhakkhānañca [abbhakkhānaṃ va (sī. pī.)] dāruṇaṃ;
Parikkhayañca [parikkhayaṃ va (sī. syā. pī.)] ñātīnaṃ, bhogānañca [bhogānaṃ va (sī. syā. pī.)] pabhaṅguraṃ [pabhaṅgunaṃ (ka.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 138-140. He will be subject to acute pain, [NāradaFn10-07] disaster, bodily injury, or even grievous sickness, or loss of mind, or oppression by the king, or heavy accusation, or loss of relatives, or destruction of wealth, [NāradaFn10-08] or ravaging fire that will burn his house. Upon the dissolution of the body such unwise man will be born in hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 138-140. Sharp pain, or disaster, bodily injury, serious illness, or derangement of mind, trouble from the government, or grave charges, loss of relatives, or loss of wealth, or houses destroyed by ravaging fire; upon dissolution of the body that ignorant man is born in hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

137-140

  Whoever, with a rod,
  harasses an innocent man, unarmed,
  quickly falls into any of ten things:

harsh pains, devastation, a broken body, grave illness,
mental derangement, trouble with the government,
violent slander, relatives lost, property dissolved,
houses burned down.

  At the break-up of the body
  this one with no discernment,
  reappears in
  hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
137-140

A fool who might menace one morally upright,
Or using a cudgel a pure man should strike,
Would swiftly encounter a terrible plight:
Loss of relations;
Or racking sensations;
Or body calamity;
Loss of his sanity;
Terrible health;
Or the loss of his wealth;
Or his home’s devastation
In wild conflagration;
Or king, or authority,
Show him barbarity;
Then after death,
An infernal finality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 139 Or a misfortune coming from the king, or a fearful accusation, or loss of relations, or destruction of treasures,
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 139
[continued from DhP 138]
Or a trouble from the king, and cruel accusations,
or loss of relatives, or destruction of wealth.
[continued in DhP 140] [DLMBSFn-V139]
Dhammapada Dhp. 140
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
140. Atha vāssa agārāni aggi ḍahati pāvako
Kāyassa bhedā duppañño nirayaṃ so upapajjati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
140. Atha vāssa agārāni, aggi ḍahati [ḍayhati (ka.)] pāvako;
Kāyassa bhedā duppañño, nirayaṃ sopapajjati [so upapajjati (sī. syā.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 138-140. He will be subject to acute pain, [NāradaFn10-07] disaster, bodily injury, or even grievous sickness, or loss of mind, or oppression by the king, or heavy accusation, or loss of relatives, or destruction of wealth, [NāradaFn10-08] or ravaging fire that will burn his house. Upon the dissolution of the body such unwise man will be born in hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 138-140. Sharp pain, or disaster, bodily injury, serious illness, or derangement of mind, trouble from the government, or grave charges, loss of relatives, or loss of wealth, or houses destroyed by ravaging fire; upon dissolution of the body that ignorant man is born in hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

137-140

  Whoever, with a rod,
  harasses an innocent man, unarmed,
  quickly falls into any of ten things:

harsh pains, devastation, a broken body, grave illness,
mental derangement, trouble with the government,
violent slander, relatives lost, property dissolved,
houses burned down.

  At the break-up of the body
  this one with no discernment,
  reappears in
  hell.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
137-140

A fool who might menace one morally upright,
Or using a cudgel a pure man should strike,
Would swiftly encounter a terrible plight:
Loss of relations;
Or racking sensations;
Or body calamity;
Loss of his sanity;
Terrible health;
Or the loss of his wealth;
Or his home’s devastation
In wild conflagration;
Or king, or authority,
Show him barbarity;
Then after death,
An infernal finality.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 140 Or lightning-fire will burn his houses; and when his body is destroyed, the fool will go to hell.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 140
[continued from DhP 139]
Or then a blazing fire will burn his houses.
And after death this fool will be reborn in hell. [DLMBSFn-V140]
Dhammapada Dhp. 141
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
141. Na naggacariyā na jaṭā na paṅkā
Nānāsakā thaṇḍilasāyikā vā
Rājo ca jallaṃ ukkuṭikappadhānaṃ
Sodhenti maccaṃ avitiṇṇakaṅkhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
141. Na naggacariyā na jaṭā na paṅkā, nānāsakā thaṇḍilasāyikā vā;
Rajojallaṃ ukkuṭikappadhānaṃ, sodhenti maccaṃ avitiṇṇakaṅkhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

EXTERNAL PENANCES CANNOT PURIFY A PERSON

  1. Not wandering naked, [NāradaFn10-09] nor matted locks, [NāradaFn10-10] nor filth, [NāradaFn10-11] nor fasting, [NāradaFn10-12] nor lying on the ground, [NāradaFn10-13] nor dust, [NāradaFn10-14] nor ashes, [NāradaFn10-15] nor striving squatting on the heels, [NāradaFn10-16] can purify a mortal who has not overcome doubts. [NāradaFn10-17]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 141. Neither going about naked, nor matted locks, nor filth, nor fasting, nor lying on the ground, nor smearing oneself with ashes and dust, nor sitting on the heels (in penance) can purify a mortal who has not overcome doubt.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

141-142

Neither nakedness nor matted hair
nor mud nor the refusal of food
nor sleeping on the bare ground
nor dust & dirt nor squatting austerities
cleanses the mortal
who's not gone beyond doubt.

If, though adorned, one lives in tune
with the chaste life
 — calmed, tamed, & assured —
having put down the rod toward all beings,
he's a contemplative
     a brahman
     a monk.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
141
He wanders nude;
Abstains from food;
His filthy body’s smearings too.

He plaits his locks;
On heels he squats;
The earth is all the bed he’s got.

Such acts won’t clean
This mortal being
In whom is doubt still lingering.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 141 Not nakedness, not platted hair, not dirt, not fasting, or lying on the earth, not rubbing with dust, not sitting motionless, can purify a mortal who has not overcome desires.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 141
Not wandering around naked, not matted hair, not mud on the body,
not fasting, nor lying on the bare ground,
dust and sweat, sitting on one's heels -
nothing can purify a mortal who has not overcome his doubts. [DLMBSFn-V141]
Dhammapada Dhp. 142
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
142. Alaṅkato ce'pi samaṃ careyya
Santo danto niyato brahmacārī
Sabbesu bhūtesu nidhāya daṇḍaṃ
So brāhmaṇo so samaṇo sa bhikkhu.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
142. Alaṅkato cepi samaṃ careyya, santo danto niyato brahmacārī;
Sabbesu bhūtesu nidhāya daṇḍaṃ, so brāhmaṇo so samaṇo sa bhikkhu.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NOT BY EXTERNAL APPEARANCE DOES ONE BECOME HOLY

  1. Though gaily decked, if he should live in peace, (with passions) subdued, (and senses) controlled, certain [NāradaFn10-18] (of the four Paths of Sainthood), perfectly pure, [NāradaFn10-19] laying aside the rod (in his relations) towards all living beings, [NāradaFn10-20] a Brāhmaṇa [NāradaFn10-21] indeed is he, an ascetic [NāradaFn10-22] is he, a bhikkhu [NāradaFn10-23] is he. [NāradaFn10-24]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 142. Even though he be well-attired, yet if he is poised, calm, controlled and established in the holy life, having set aside violence towards all beings — he, truly, is a holy man, a renunciate, a monk.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

141-142

Neither nakedness nor matted hair
nor mud nor the refusal of food
nor sleeping on the bare ground
nor dust & dirt nor squatting austerities
cleanses the mortal
who's not gone beyond doubt.

If, though adorned, one lives in tune
with the chaste life
 — calmed, tamed, & assured —
having put down the rod toward all beings,
he's a contemplative
     a brahman
     a monk.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
142
If he’s chaste and restrained,
If he’s calmed and he’s tamed,
From the hurting of all forms of life he abstains:
Though this man walks his way
Well-adorned and arrayed,
He can ‘brahman’ or ‘monk’ or ‘ascetic’ be named.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 142 He who, though dressed in fine apparel, exercises tranquillity, is quiet, subdued, restrained, chaste, and has ceased to find fault with all other beings, he indeed is a Brahmana, an ascetic (sramana), a friar (bhikshu).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 142
Even if one would walk around like an adorned man,
[but he would be] peaceful, self-controlled, restrained and pure,
having given up punishing of all living beings,
he is a Brahmin, he is a recluse, he is a monk. [DLMBSFn-V142]
Dhammapada Dhp. 143
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
143. Hirīnisedho puriso koci lokasmiṃ vijjati
Yo nindaṃ apabodhati asso bhadro kasāmiva.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
143. Hirīnisedho puriso, koci lokasmi vijjati;
Yo niddaṃ [nindaṃ (sī. pī.) saṃ. ni. 1.18] apabodheti [apabodhati (sī. syā. pī.)], asso bhadro kasāmiva.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE MODEST ARE RARE IN THIS WORLD

  1. (Rarely) is found in this world anyone who, restrained by modesty, avoids reproach, as a thorough-bred horse (avoids) the whip. [NāradaFn10-25]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 143. Only rarely is there a man in this world who, restrained by modesty, avoids reproach, as a thoroughbred horse avoids the whip.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

143 [ThaniSFn-V143]

Who in the world
is a man constrained by conscience,
who awakens         to censure
like a fine stallion    to the whip?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
143
A human restrained
By his feelings of shame
Will avoid being blamed,
Like a horse that’s well-tamed
Doesn’t suffer the pain
Of the lash of a cane.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 143 Is there in this world any man so restrained by humility that he does not mind reproof, as a well-trained horse the whip?
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 143
In this world, does there exist a person restrained by conscience,
who avoids blame, like a good horse avoids a whip? [DLMBSFn-V143]
Dhammapada Dhp. 144
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
144. Asso yathā bhadro kasāniviṭiṭho
Ātāpino saṃvegino bhavātha
Saddhāya sīlena ca vīriyena ca
Samādhinā dhammavinicchayena ca
Sampannavijjācaraṇā patissatā
Pahassatha dukkhamidaṃ anappakaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
144. Asso yathā bhadro kasāniviṭṭho, ātāpino saṃvegino bhavātha;
Saddhāya sīlena ca vīriyena ca, samādhinā dhammavinicchayena ca;
Sampannavijjācaraṇā patissatā, jahissatha [pahassatha (sī. syā. pī.)] dukkhamidaṃ anappakaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE VIRTUOUS AND GET RID OF SUFFERING

  1. Like a thorough-bred horse touched by the whip, even so be strenuous and zealous. By confidence, by virtue, by effort, by concentration, by investigation of the Truth, by being endowed with knowledge and conduct, [NāradaFn10-26] and by being mindful, get rid of this great suffering.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 144. Like a thoroughbred horse touched by the whip, be strenuous, be filled with spiritual yearning. By faith and moral purity, by effort and meditation, by investigation of the truth, by being rich in knowledge and virtue, and by being mindful, destroy this unlimited suffering.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

144

Like a fine stallion
struck with a whip,
be ardent & chastened.
Through conviction
  virtue, persistence,
  concentration, judgment,
consummate in knowledge & conduct,
  mindful,
you'll abandon this not-insignificant pain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
144
Like a horse one might train
That’s aroused with a cane,
You must smother your vast tribulation:

Be zealous, one-pointed and cultivate purity;
Trust, have composure, be mindful, have energy!
Blessed with discernment,
Endowed with good conduct,
Make effort in Dhamma enquiry.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 144 Like a well-trained horse when touched by the whip, be ye active and lively, and by faith, by virtue, by energy, by meditation, by discernment of the law you will overcome this great pain (of reproof), perfect in knowledge and in behaviour, and never forgetful.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 144
Be like a good horse when touched by a whip - strenuous and anxious.
By faith, virtue, effort and concentration, by investigation of truth,
by having knowledge and conduct, by being mindful abandon this big suffering. [DLMBSFn-V144]
Dhammapada Dhp. 145
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
145. Udakaṃ hi nayanti nettikā usukārā namayanti tejanaṃ
Dāruṃ namayanti tacchakā attānaṃ damayanti subbatā.

Daṇḍavaggo dasamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
145. Udakañhi nayanti nettikā, usukārā namayanti tejanaṃ;
Dāruṃ namayanti tacchakā, attānaṃ damayanti subbatā.

Daṇḍavaggo dasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE GOOD CONTROL THEMSELVES

  1. Irrigators lead the waters. Fletchers bend the shafts. Carpenters bend the wood. The virtuous control themselves. [NāradaFn10-27]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 145. Irrigators regulate the waters, fletchers straighten arrow shafts, carpenters shape wood, and the good control themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

145

Irrigators guide    the water.
Fletchers shape     the arrow shaft.
Carpenters shape    the wood.
Those of good practices control
                 themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
145
Farmers channel water;
Craftsmen fashion timber;
Fletchers trim their arrowshafts;
Those of virtue train themselves.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 145 Well-makers lead the water (wherever they like); fletchers bend the arrow; carpenters bend a log of wood; good people fashion themselves.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 145
Irrigators lead water. Arrow-makers bend arrow-shaft.
Carpenters bend wood. Virtuous ones master themselves. [DLMBSFn-V145]
Dhammapada Dhp. 146
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Jarāvaggo.
146. Ko nu hāso kimānando niccaṃ pajjalite sati146
Andhakārena onaddhā padīpaṃ na gavessatha.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

11. Jarāvaggo

146. Ko nu hāso [kinnu hāso (ka.)] kimānando, niccaṃ pajjalite sati;
Andhakārena onaddhā, padīpaṃ na gavesatha.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 11 Old Age

SEEK THE LIGHT

  1. What is laughter, what is joy, when the world is ever burning? [NāradaFn11-01] Shrouded by darkness, would you not seek the light?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XI Old Age

146. When this world is ever ablaze, why this laughter, why this jubilation? Shrouded in darkness, will you not see the light?

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XI Aging

146

What laughter, why joy,
when constantly aflame?
  Enveloped in darkness,
don't you look for a lamp?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 11 Decay

146a
For what the mirth and jubilation
In this endless conflagration?

146b
Blind in the black of the night:
Won’t you endeavour to seek for a light?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XI: Old Age

146 How is there laughter, how is there joy, as this world is always burning? Why do you not seek a light, ye who are surrounded by darkness?

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 11: The Old Age

DhP 146
What laughter? Why joy? When everything is constantly burning?
Covered by darkness, you do not seek light? [DLMBSFn-V146]
Dhammapada Dhp. 147
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
147. Passa cittakataṃ bimbaṃ arukāyaṃ samussitaṃ
Āturaṃ bahusaṅkappaṃ yassa natthi dhuvaṃ ṭhiti.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
147. Passa cittakataṃ bimbaṃ, arukāyaṃ samussitaṃ;
Āturaṃ bahusaṅkappaṃ, yassa natthi dhuvaṃ ṭhiti.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

FOUL IS THIS GAILY DECKED BODY

  1. Behold this beautiful body, a mass of sores, a heaped-up (lump), diseased, much thought of, in which nothing lasts, nothing persists. [NāradaFn11-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 147. Behold this body — a painted image, a mass of heaped up sores, infirm, full of hankering — of which nothing is lasting or stable!
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

147

Look at the beautified image,
a heap of festering wounds, shored up:
ill, but the object
  of many resolves,
where there is nothing
  lasting or sure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
147
Look at this beautified puppet,
Haughty and full of supposing;
Orifice-marked(1), full of sickness;
Unstable, with nothing enduring. [VaradoFn-V147]
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 147 Look at this dressed-up lump, covered with wounds, joined together, sickly, full of many thoughts, which has no strength, no hold!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 147
Look at this mind-created image, a compounded heap of sores,
diseased, with many plans, which does not have any permanence or stability. [DLMBSFn-V147]
Dhammapada Dhp. 148
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
148. Parijiṇṇamidaṃ rūpaṃ roganiḍḍhaṃ pabhaṅguraṃ
Bhijjati pūtisandeho maraṇantaṃ hi jīvitaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
148. Parijiṇṇamidaṃ rūpaṃ, roganīḷaṃ [roganiḍḍhaṃ (sī. pī.), roganiddhaṃ (syā.)] pabhaṅguraṃ;
Bhijjati pūtisandeho, maraṇantañhi jīvitaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LIFE ENDS IN DEATH

  1. Thoroughly worn out is this body, a nest of diseases, perishable. This putrid mass breaks up. Truly, life ends in death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 148. Fully worn out is this body, a nest of disease, and fragile. This foul mass breaks up, for death is the end of life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

148

Worn out is this body,
a nest of diseases, dissolving.
This putrid conglomeration
is bound to break up,
for life is hemmed in with death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
148
Decayed is your delicate frame,
A nest of disease and affliction.
This odious lump falls apart,
And this life, indeed, comes to extinction.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 148 This body is wasted, full of sickness, and frail; this heap of corruption breaks to pieces, life indeed ends in death.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 148
Decayed is this body, a frail nest of diseases.
This foul mass breaks up. Indeed, the life ends in death. [DLMBSFn-V148]
Dhammapada Dhp. 149
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
149. Yānimāni apatthāni alāpūneva sārade
Kāpotakāni aṭṭhīni tāni disvāna kā rati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
149. Yānimāni apatthāni [yānimāni apatthāni (sī. syā. pī.), yānimāni’paviddhāni (?)], alābūneva [alāpūneva (sī. syā. pī.)] sārade;
Kāpotakāni aṭṭhīni, tāni disvāna kā rati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

WHAT DELIGHT IN SEEING WHITE BONES?

  1. Like gourds cast away in autumn are these dove-hued bones. What pleasure is there in looking at them?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 149. These dove-colored bones are like gourds that lie scattered about in autumn. Having seen them, how can one seek delight?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

149

On seeing these bones
  discarded
like gourds in the fall,
  pigeon-gray:
         what delight?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
149
Your beloved’s grey bones, long-discarded,
Like slender white gourds from the harvest:
You wistfully view them with far-away eyes.
What is the pleasure in them you descry?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 149 Those white bones, like gourds thrown away in the autumn, what pleasure is there in looking at them?
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 149
Those gray bones, thrown away like pumpkins in fall.
Seeing them, what love can there be? [DLMBSFn-V149]
Dhammapada Dhp. 150
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
150. Aṭṭhīnaṃ nagaraṃ kataṃ maṃsalohitalepanaṃ
Yattha jarā ca maccu ca māno makkho ca ohito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
150. Aṭṭhīnaṃ nagaraṃ kataṃ, maṃsalohitalepanaṃ;
Yattha jarā ca maccu ca, māno makkho ca ohito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THIS BODY IS COMPOSED OF FLESH AND BLOOD

  1. Of bones is (this) city made, plastered with flesh and blood. Herein are stored decay, death, conceit, and detraction.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 150. This city (body) is built of bones, plastered with flesh and blood; within are decay and death, pride and jealousy.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

150

A city made of bones,
plastered over with flesh & blood,
whose hidden treasures are:
  pride & contempt,
  aging & death.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
150
Of bones is this citadel made;
With meat and with blood it is swathed;
Senescence and death wait inside –
And vilification and pride.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 150 After a stronghold has been made of the bones, it is covered with flesh and blood, and there dwell in it old age and death, pride and deceit.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 150
There is a city made of bones, plastered with flesh and blood,
where there are deposited old age, death, conceit and hypocrisy. [DLMBSFn-V150]
Dhammapada Dhp. 151
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
151. Jīranti ve rāja rathā sucittā
Atho sarīrampi jaraṃ upeti.
Satañca dhammo na jaraṃ upeti
Santo have sabbhi pavedayanti.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
151. Jīranti ve rājarathā sucittā, atho sarīrampi jaraṃ upeti;
Satañca dhammo na jaraṃ upeti, santo have sabbhi pavedayanti.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

RIGHTEOUSNESS DOES NOT WEAR AWAY

  1. Even ornamented royal chariots wear out. So too the body reaches old age. But the Dhamma [NāradaFn11-03] of the Good grows not old. Thus do the Good reveal it among the Good. [NāradaFn11-04]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 151. Even gorgeous royal chariots wear out, and indeed this body too wears out. But the Dhamma of the Good does not age; thus the Good make it known to the good.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

151

Even royal chariots
well-embellished
get run down,
and so does the body
succumb to old age.
But the Dhamma of the good
doesn't succumb to old age:
the good let the civilized know.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
151
The state royal coaches decay:
The body to old age approaches.
The virtue of Dhamma does not waste away;
The calmed make this known to the righteous.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 151 The brilliant chariots of kings are destroyed, the body also approaches destruction, but the virtue of good people never approaches destruction,--thus do the good say to the good.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 151
Beautiful king's chariots wear out. And also the body gets old.
But the teaching of the good ones does not get old. The good ones teach it to each other. [DLMBSFn-V151]
Dhammapada Dhp. 152
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
152. Appassutāyaṃ puriso balivaddo'va jīrati
Maṃsāni tassa vaḍḍhanti paññā tassa na vaḍḍhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
152. Appassutāyaṃ puriso, balibaddhova [balivaddova (sī. syā. pī.)] jīrati;
Maṃsāni tassa vaḍḍhanti, paññā tassa na vaḍḍhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE WITH LITTLE LEARNING LACKS WISDOM

  1. The man of little learning grows old like the ox. His muscles grow; his wisdom grows not.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 152. The man of little learning grows old like a bull. He grows only in bulk, but, his wisdom does not grow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

152 [ThaniSFn-V152]

This unlistening man
matures like an ox.
His muscles develop,
his discernment     not.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
152
The man of small learning matures like an ox:
His body develops, his wisdom does not.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 152 A man who has learnt little, grows old like an ox; his flesh grows, but his knowledge does not grow.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 152
The person without learning grows old like an ox.
His flesh grows; his wisdom does not. [DLMBSFn-V152]
Dhammapada Dhp. 153
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
153. Anekajāti saṃsāraṃ sandhāvissaṃ anibbisaṃ
Gahakārakaṃ gavesanto dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
153. Anekajātisaṃsāraṃ , sandhāvissaṃ anibbisaṃ;
Gahakāraṃ [gahakārakaṃ (sī. syā. pī.)] gavesanto, dukkhā jāti punappunaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

CRAVING IS THE BUILDER OF THIS HOUSE

  1. Through many a birth I wandered in saṃsāra, [NāradaFn11-05] seeking, but not finding, the builder of the house. Sorrowful is it to be born again and again.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 153. Through many a birth in samsara have I wandered in vain, seeking the builder of this house (of life). Repeated birth is indeed suffering!
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

153-154 [ThaniSFn-V153-154]

Through the round of many births I roamed
  without reward,
  without rest,
seeking the house-builder.
  Painful is birth
  again & again.

House-builder, you're seen!
You will not build a house again.
All your rafters broken,
the ridge pole dismantled,
immersed in dismantling, the mind
has attained to the end of craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
153 & 154

For lifetimes untold
Through samsara I’ve roamed
For the housebuilder seeking
But failing to meet him.

How great is the pain
Ever new births to gain!

But now, builder, you’re met;
No more homes you’ll erect.
For the rafters are fractured,
The ridgepole is shattered.

My mind, in forsaking
Conditioned causation,
Through craving’s destruction,
Has reached liberation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 153, 154. Looking for the maker of this tabernacle, I shall have to run through a course of many births, so long as I do not find (him); and painful is birth again and again. But now, maker of the tabernacle, thou hast been seen; thou shalt not make up this tabernacle again. All thy rafters are broken, thy ridge-pole is sundered; the mind, approaching the Eternal (visankhara, nirvana), has attained to the extinction of all desires.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 153
Through many rounds of rebirth have I ran, looking for the house-builder,
but not finding him. Painful is repeated rebirth. [DLMBSFn-V153]
Dhammapada Dhp. 154
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
154. Gahakāraka diṭṭho'si puna gehaṃ na kāhasi
Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā gahakauṭaṃ visaṅkhitaṃ
Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
154. Gahakāraka diṭṭhosi, puna gehaṃ na kāhasi;
Sabbā te phāsukā bhaggā, gahakūṭaṃ visaṅkhataṃ;
Visaṅkhāragataṃ cittaṃ, taṇhānaṃ khayamajjhagā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. O house-builder! Thou art seen. Thou shalt build no house again. All thy rafters are broken. Thy ridge-pole is shattered. My mind has attained the unconditioned. Achieved is the end of craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 154. O house-builder, you are seen! You will not build this house again. For your rafters are broken and your ridgepole shattered. My mind has reached the Unconditioned; I have attained the destruction of craving. [BudRkFn-v153-154]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

153-154 [ThaniSFn-V153-154]

Through the round of many births I roamed
  without reward,
  without rest,
seeking the house-builder.
  Painful is birth
  again & again.

House-builder, you're seen!
You will not build a house again.
All your rafters broken,
the ridge pole dismantled,
immersed in dismantling, the mind
has attained to the end of craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
153 & 154

For lifetimes untold
Through samsara I’ve roamed
For the housebuilder seeking
But failing to meet him.

How great is the pain
Ever new births to gain!

But now, builder, you’re met;
No more homes you’ll erect.
For the rafters are fractured,
The ridgepole is shattered.

My mind, in forsaking
Conditioned causation,
Through craving’s destruction,
Has reached liberation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 153, 154. Looking for the maker of this tabernacle, I shall have to run through a course of many births, so long as I do not find (him); and painful is birth again and again. But now, maker of the tabernacle, thou hast been seen; thou shalt not make up this tabernacle again. All thy rafters are broken, thy ridge-pole is sundered; the mind, approaching the Eternal (visankhara, nirvana), has attained to the extinction of all desires.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 154
Oh, house-builder, you are seen! You will not build this house again!
All your ribs are broken; the roof is destroyed.
My mind is dissolute; I have attained the end of all cravings. [DLMBSFn-V154]
Dhammapada Dhp. 155
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
155. Acaritvā brahmacariyaṃ aladdhā yobbane dhanaṃ
Jiṇṇakoñcā, va jhāyanti khīṇamaccheva pallale.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
155. Acaritvā brahmacariyaṃ, aladdhā yobbane dhanaṃ;
Jiṇṇakoñcāva jhāyanti, khīṇamaccheva pallale.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THEY REPENT WHO DO NOT PROGRESS MATERIALLY AND SPIRITUALLY

  1. They who have not led the Holy Life, who in youth have not acquired wealth, pine away like old herons at a pond without fish.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 155. Those who in youth have not led the holy life, or have failed to acquire wealth, languish like old cranes in the pond without fish.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

155-156

Neither living the chaste life
nor gaining wealth in their youth,
they waste away like old herons
in a dried-up lake
depleted of fish.

Neither living the chaste life
nor gaining wealth in their youth,
they lie around,
misfired from the bow,
sighing over old times.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
155
The old who, in their youth, neither took on the holy-life, nor made any savings, brood like old herons beside a fished-out lake.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 155 Men who have not observed proper discipline, and have not gained treasure in their youth, perish like old herons in a lake without fish.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 155
Those, who have not led the holy life, and have not obtained wealth while young,
ponder just like old herons in the lake without fish. [DLMBSFn-V155]
Dhammapada Dhp. 156
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
156. Acaritvā brahmacariyaṃ aladdhā yobbane dhanaṃ
Senti cāpā'tikhittā'va purāṇāni anutthunaṃ.

Jarāvaggo ekādasamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
156. Acaritvā brahmacariyaṃ, aladdhā yobbane dhanaṃ;
Senti cāpātikhīṇāva, purāṇāni anutthunaṃ.

Jarāvaggo ekādasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. They who have not led the Holy Life; who in youth have not acquired wealth, lie like worn-out bows, sighing after the past.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 156. Those who in youth have not lead the holy life, or have failed to acquire wealth, lie sighing over the past, like worn out arrows (shot from) a bow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

155-156

Neither living the chaste life
nor gaining wealth in their youth,
they waste away like old herons
in a dried-up lake
depleted of fish.

Neither living the chaste life
nor gaining wealth in their youth,
they lie around,
misfired from the bow,
sighing over old times.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
156
The old who, in their youth, neither took on the holy-life, nor made any savings, lie on their backs lamenting the past, like misfired arrows.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 156 Men who have not observed proper discipline, and have not gained treasure in their youth, lie, like broken bows, sighing after the past.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 156
Those, who have not led the holy life, and have not obtained wealth while young,
lie just like arrows shot from a bow, moaning over the past. [DLMBSFn-V156]
Dhammapada Dhp. 157
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Attavaggo.
157. Attānaṃ ce piyaṃ jaññā rakkheyya naṃ surakkhitaṃ157
Tiṇṇamaññataraṃ yāmaṃ paṭijaggeyya paṇḍito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

12. Attavaggo

157. Attānañce piyaṃ jaññā, rakkheyya naṃ surakkhitaṃ;
Tiṇṇaṃ aññataraṃ yāmaṃ, paṭijaggeyya paṇḍito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 12 The Self

BE VIGILANT

  1. If one holds oneself [NāradaFn12-01] dear, one should protect oneself well. During every one of the three watches the wise man should keep vigil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XII The Self

157. If one holds oneself dear, one should diligently watch oneself. Let the wise man keep vigil during any of the three watches of the night.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XII Self

157 [ThaniSFn-V157]

If you hold yourself dear
then guard, guard yourself well.
The wise person would stay awake
  nursing himself
in any of the three watches of the night,
  the three stages of life.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 12 The Self

157
If we saw that the love for ourselves is not slight,
We’d watch over ourselves without lassitude.
Thus, the prudent, at least for one third of the night,
Should attend to themselves with solicitude.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XII: Self

157 If a man hold himself dear, let him watch himself carefully; during one at least out of the three watches a wise man should be watchful.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 12: The Self

DhP 157
If someone holds oneself dear, let him guard himself very well.
In any of the three watches of the night let the wise one be watchful. [DLMBSFn-V157]
Dhammapada Dhp. 158
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
158. Attānameva paṭhamaṃ patirūpe nivesaye
Athaññamanusāseyya na kilisseyya paṇḍito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
158. Attānameva paṭhamaṃ, patirūpe nivesaye;
Athaññamanusāseyya, na kilisseyya paṇḍito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ADVISERS SHOULD SET THE EXAMPLE FIRST

  1. Let one first establish oneself in what is proper, and then instruct others. Such a wise man will not be defiled. [NāradaFn12-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 158. One should first establish oneself in what is proper; then only should one instruct others. Thus the wise man will not be reproached.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

158

  First
he'd settle himself
in what is correct,
  only then
teach others.
He wouldn't stain his name
     : he is wise.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
158
Once you’ve established
Your own firm foundation
In ways that are proper
Train others thereafter.
For ‘learned exponents’
Should not have defilements . . .
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 158 Let each man direct himself first to what is proper, then let him teach others; thus a wise man will not suffer.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 158
Let one first establish oneself in what is proper,
and then instruct others. A wise one should not be impure. [DLMBSFn-V158]
Dhammapada Dhp. 159
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
159. Attānañce tathā kayirā yathaññamanusāsati
Sudanto vata dammetha attā hi kira duddamo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
159. Attānaṃ ce tathā kayirā, yathāññamanusāsati;
Sudanto vata dametha, attā hi kira duddamo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ACT AS YOU INSTRUCT

  1. As he instructs others so should he himself act. Himself fully controlled, he should control (others); for oneself, indeed, is difficult to control.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 159. One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well controlled oneself. Difficult, indeed, is self-control.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

159

If you'd mold yourself
the way you teach others,
then, well-trained,
go ahead & tame —
  for, as they say,
what's hard to tame is you
  yourself.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
159
If, at first, he himself did behave
In the way that he others might train,
Himself thus being tamed, as a trainer he’s capable -
But taming oneself is a task that’s formidable.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 159 If a man make himself as he teaches others to be, then, being himself well subdued, he may subdue (others); one's own self is indeed difficult to subdue.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 159
If only one always did what one advises others!
One well restrained can teach others. Indeed, it is difficult to control oneself. [DLMBSFn-V159]
Dhammapada Dhp. 160
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
160. Attā hi attano nātho kohi nātho paro siyā
Attanā'va sudantena nāthaṃ labhati dullabhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
160. Attā hi attano nātho, ko hi nātho paro siyā;
Attanā hi sudantena, nāthaṃ labhati dullabhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SELF IS ONE'S REFUGE

  1. Oneself, indeed, is one's saviour, for what other saviour would there be? With oneself well controlled one obtains a saviour difficult to find.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 160. One truly is the protector of oneself; who else could the protector be? With oneself fully controlled, one gains a mastery that is hard to gain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

160

Your own self is
your own mainstay,
for who else could your mainstay be?
With you yourself well-trained
you obtain the mainstay
hard to obtain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
160
You are indeed your own guardian;
Which person else could it be?
With yourself satisfactorily mastered,
You come by a guardian not easy to meet.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 160 Self is the lord of self, who else could be the lord? With self well subdued, a man finds a lord such as few can find.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 160
One is indeed one's own lord. What other lord would there be?
With oneself well restrained, one will obtain the lord that is so hard to get. [DLMBSFn-V160]
Dhammapada Dhp. 161
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
161. Attanā'va kataṃ pāpaṃ attajaṃ attasambhavaṃ
Abhimatthati dummedhaṃ vajiraṃ'vasmamayaṃ maṇiṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
161. Attanā hi kataṃ pāpaṃ, attajaṃ attasambhavaṃ;
Abhimatthati [abhimantati (sī. pī.)] dummedhaṃ, vajiraṃ vasmamayaṃ [vajiraṃva’mhamayaṃ (syā. ka.)] maṇiṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ONE'S EVIL

  1. By oneself alone is evil done; it is self-born, it is self-caused. Evil grinds the unwise as a diamond grinds a hard gem.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 161. The evil a witless man does by himself, born of himself and produced by himself, grinds him as a diamond grinds a hard gem.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

161

The evil he himself has done
 — self-born, self-created —
grinds down the dullard,
as a diamond, a precious stone.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
161
The evil that one executes
Is what one has oneself produced.
Like diamond grinds the hardest jewel,
That self-made evil grinds the fool.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 161 The evil done by oneself, self-begotten, self-bred, crushes the foolish, as a diamond breaks a precious stone.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 161
The evil is done by oneself, proceeding from oneself, originating from oneself.
It crushes the fool, just like a diamond crushes a hard gem. [DLMBSFn-V161]
Dhammapada Dhp. 162
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
162. Yassa accantadussīlyaṃ māluvā sālamivotataṃ
Karoti so tathattānaṃ yathā naṃ icchatī diso.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
162. Yassa accantadussīlyaṃ, māluvā sālamivotthataṃ;
Karoti so tathattānaṃ, yathā naṃ icchatī diso.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE CORRUPT BRING ABOUT THEIR OWN RUIN

  1. He who is exceedingly corrupt, like a māluvā creeper strangling a sal tree, does to himself what even an enemy would wish for him.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 162. Just as a single creeper strangles the tree on which it grows, even so, a man who is exceedingly depraved harms himself as only an enemy might wish.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

162 [ThaniSFn-V162]

When overspread by extreme vice —
like a sal tree by a vine —
you do to yourself
what an enemy would wish.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
162
A man who has conduct that’s truly malign
Is just like a tree with a strangling vine:
What he does to himself is the very same thing
That his foe would take pleasure in doing to him.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 162 He whose wickedness is very great brings himself down to that state where his enemy wishes him to be, as a creeper does with the tree which it surrounds.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 162
Who is of extremely bad morality, like a creeper spread over a Sala tree,
he will do unto himself, what an enemy wishes to do unto him. [DLMBSFn-V162]
Dhammapada Dhp. 163
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
163. Sukarāni asādhūni attano ahitāni ca
Yaṃ ve hitañca sādhuṃ ca taṃ ve paramadukkaraṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
163. Sukarāni asādhūni, attano ahitāni ca;
Yaṃ ve hitañca sādhuñca, taṃ ve paramadukkaraṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

EVIL IS EASY BUT GOOD IS DIFFICULT

  1. Easy to do are things that are hard and not beneficial to oneself, but very, very, difficult indeed, to do is that which is beneficial and good.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 163. Easy to do are things that are bad and harmful to oneself. But exceedingly difficult to do are things that are good and beneficial.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

163

They're easy to do —
things of no good
& no use to yourself.
What's truly useful & good
is truly harder than hard to do.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
163
What’s immoral to do,
And self-damaging too,
Is not hard to pursue.

But what’s proper to do,
And is salutary too,
It is hard carrying through.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 163 Bad deeds, and deeds hurtful to ourselves, are easy to do; what is beneficial and good, that is very difficult to do.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 163
Easy done are deeds, that are wrong and harmful to oneself.
What is beneficial and good, that is indeed most difficult to do. [DLMBSFn-V163]
Dhammapada Dhp. 164
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
164. Yo sāsanaṃ arahataṃ ariyānaṃ dhammajīvinaṃ
Paṭikkosati dummedho diṭṭhiṃ nissāya pāpikaṃ
Phalāni kaṭṭhakasseva attaghaññāya phallati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
164. Yo sāsanaṃ arahataṃ, ariyānaṃ dhammajīvinaṃ;
Paṭikkosati dummedho, diṭṭhiṃ nissāya pāpikaṃ;
Phalāni kaṭṭhakasseva, attaghātāya [attaghaññāya (sī. syā. pī.)] phallati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SCORN NOT THE NOBLE

  1. The stupid man, who, on account of false views, scorns the teaching of the Arahants, the Noble Ones, and the Righteous, ripens like the fruit of the kāshta reed, only for his own destruction.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 164. Whoever, on account of perverted views, scorns the Teaching of the Perfected Ones, the Noble and Righteous Ones — that fool, like the bamboo, produces fruits only for self destruction. [BudRkFn-v164]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

164 [ThaniSFn-V164]

The teaching of those who live the Dhamma,
worthy ones, noble:
whoever maligns it
        — a dullard,
        inspired by evil view —
bears fruit for his own destruction,
like the fruiting of the bamboo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
164
The woman who’s senseless
Denounces the teachings
Of those who are noble,
Whose living is righteous.

She’s under the sway
Of opinions profane,
And the fruits of her life
Will just bring her to ruin,
As bearing of fruit
Is the bamboo’s undoing.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 164 The foolish man who scorns the rule of the venerable (Arahat), of the elect (Ariya), of the virtuous, and follows false doctrine, he bears fruit to his own destruction, like the fruits of the Katthaka reed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 164
Who scorns thee teaching of the Arahants, the Noble Ones, living righteously,
the fool, who is relying on wrong beliefs,
produces fruit just like a bamboo - for his own destruction. [DLMBSFn-V164]
Dhammapada Dhp. 165
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
165. Attanā'va kataṃ pāpaṃ attanā saṃkilissati
Attanā akataṃ pāpaṃ attanā'va visujjhati
Suddhi asuddhi paccattaṃ nāññamañño visodhaye.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
165. Attanā hi [attanāva (sī. syā. pī.)] kataṃ pāpaṃ, attanā saṃkilissati;
Attanā akataṃ pāpaṃ, attanāva visujjhati;
Suddhī asuddhi paccattaṃ, nāñño aññaṃ [nāññamañño(sī.)] visodhaye.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

PURITY AND IMPURITY DEPEND ON ONESELF

  1. By oneself, indeed, is evil done; by oneself is one defiled. By oneself is evil left undone; by oneself indeed, is one purified. Purity and impurity depend on oneself. No one purifies another.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 165. By oneself is evil done; by oneself is one defiled. By oneself is evil left undone; by oneself is one made pure. Purity and impurity depend on oneself; no one can purify another.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

165 [ThaniSFn-V165]

Evil is done    by oneself

by oneself is one defiled.
Evil is left undone by oneself

by oneself is one cleansed.
Purity & impurity are one's own doing.
  No one purifies another.
  No other purifies one.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
165
By each themselves is evil done;
By each is each defiled.
By each themselves is evil shunned;
By each is each refined.

To polish or stain,
On ourselves it depends,
For a person cannot
By another be cleansed.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 165 By oneself the evil is done, by oneself one suffers; by oneself evil is left undone, by oneself one is purified. Purity and impurity belong to oneself, no one can purify another.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 165
The evil is done by oneself; by oneself one becomes impure.
The evil is undone by oneself; by oneself one becomes pure.
Purity and impurity depend on oneself. No one can purify another. [DLMBSFn-V165]
Dhammapada Dhp. 166
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
166. Attadatthaṃ paratthena bahunā'pi na hāpaye
Attadatthambhiññāya sadatthapasuto siyā.

Attavaggo dvādasamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
166. Attadatthaṃ paratthena, bahunāpi na hāpaye;
Attadatthamabhiññāya, sadatthapasuto siyā.

Attavaggo dvādasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

STRIVE FOR YOUR SPIRITUAL WELFARE

  1. For the sake of others' welfare, however great, let not one neglect one's own welfare. [NāradaFn12-03] Clearly perceiving one's own welfare, let one be intent on one's own goal.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 166. Let one not neglect one's own welfare for the sake of another, however great. Clearly understanding one's own welfare, let one be intent upon the good.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

166 [ThaniSFn-V166]

Don't sacrifice your own welfare
for that of another,
no matter how great.
Realizing your own true welfare,
be intent on just that.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
166
Do not disregard your own welfare
For others, for even a throng.
Having well understood your own welfare,
Venture the taking it on!
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 166 Let no one forget his own duty for the sake of another's, however great; let a man, after he has discerned his own duty, be always attentive to his duty.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 166
Let one not neglect one's own spiritual attainment for other's spiritual attainment, however great.
Having fully understood one's own spiritual attainment, let one pursue the true attainment. [DLMBSFn-V166]
Dhammapada Dhp. 167
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Lokavaggo.
167. Hīnaṃ dhammaṃ na seveyya pamādena na saṃvase
Micchādiṭṭhiṃ na seveyya na siyā lokavaddhano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

13. Lokavaggo

167.
Hīnaṃ dhammaṃ na seveyya, pamādena na saṃvase;
Micchādiṭṭhiṃ na seveyya, na siyā lokavaḍḍhano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 13 The World

GIVE UP BASE DESIRES

  1. Do not serve mean ends, [NāradaFn13-01] Do not live in heedlessness. Do not embrace false views. Do not be a world-upholder. [NāradaFn13-02]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XIII The World

167. Follow not the vulgar way; live not in heedlessness; hold not false views; linger not long in worldly existence.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XIII Worlds

167

Don't associate with lowly qualities.
Don't consort with heedlessness.
Don't associate with wrong views.
Don't busy yourself with the world.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 13 The World

167
Do not pursue the vulgar way;
Wrongful views, don’t entertain;
In heedless states do not abide;
To worldly ways do not incline.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XIII: The World

167 Do not follow the evil law! Do not live on in thoughtlessness! Do not follow false doctrine! Be not a friend of the world.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 13: The World

DhP 167
Don't practice inferior teachings; don't connect with negligence.
Don't embrace wrong beliefs; don't be attached to the world. [DLMBSFn-V167]
Dhammapada Dhp. 168
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
168. Uttiṭṭhe nappamajjeyya dhammaṃ sucaritaṃ care
Dhammacāri sukhaṃ seti asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
168. Uttiṭṭhe nappamajjeyya, dhammaṃ sucaritaṃ care;
Dhammacārī sukhaṃ seti, asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE RIGHTEOUS ARE HAPPY BE RIGHTEOUS

  1. Be not heedless in standing [NāradaFn13-03] (at people's doors for alms). Observe (this) practice scrupulously. He who observes this practice lives happily both in this world and in the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 168. Arise! Do not be heedless! Lead a righteous life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

168-169

Get up! Don't be heedless.
Live the Dhamma well.
One who lives the Dhamma
  sleeps with ease
in this world & the next.

Live the Dhamma well.
Don't live it badly.
One who lives the Dhamma
  sleeps with ease
in this world & the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
168
Strive! Try! Don’t be perfunctory:
Take on the practice, and do it painstakingly.
Seekers of Dhamma when sleeping, sleep blissfully,
Both in life here, and hereafter additionally.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 168 Rouse thyself! do not be idle! Follow the law of virtue! The virtuous rests in bliss in this world and in the next.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 168
Arise! Don't be negligent! Practice the good teaching!
One living in truth dwells happily, both in this world and in the next one. [DLMBSFn-V168]
Dhammapada Dhp. 169
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
169. Dhammaṃ care sucaritaṃ na naṃ duccaritaṃ care
Dhammacārī sukhaṃ seti asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
169. Dhammaṃ care sucaritaṃ, na naṃ duccaritaṃ care;
Dhammacārī sukhaṃ seti, asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Scrupulously observe (this) practice. Do not observe it unscrupulously. He who observes this practice lives happily both in this world and in the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 169. Lead a righteous life; lead not a base life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

168-169

Get up! Don't be heedless.
Live the Dhamma well.
One who lives the Dhamma
  sleeps with ease
in this world & the next.

Live the Dhamma well.
Don't live it badly.
One who lives the Dhamma
  sleeps with ease
in this world & the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
169
Take on the practice and do it painstakingly:
Don’t take it on and then do it disgracefully.
Seekers of Dhamma when sleeping, sleep blissfully,
Both in life here, and hereafter additionally.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 169 Follow the law of virtue; do not follow that of sin. The virtuous rests in bliss in this world and in the next.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 169
Practice the good teaching; don't practice the bad one!
One living in truth dwells happily, both in this world and in the next one. [DLMBSFn-V169]
Dhammapada Dhp. 170
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
170. Yathā bubbulakaṃ passe yathā passe marīcikaṃ
Evaṃ lokaṃ avekkhantaṃ maccurājā na passati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
170. Yathā pubbuḷakaṃ [pubbuḷakaṃ (sī. pī.)] passe, yathā passe marīcikaṃ;
Evaṃ lokaṃ avekkhantaṃ, maccurājā na passati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LIKE A BUBBLE IS THIS WORLD

  1. Just as one would look upon a bubble, just as one would look upon a mirage [NāradaFn13-04] - if a person thus looks upon the world, the King of Death sees him not.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 170. One who looks upon the world as a bubble and a mirage, him the King of Death sees not.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

170 [ThaniSFn-V170]

See it  as a bubble,
see it  as a mirage:
one who regards the world this way
the King of Death doesn't see.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
170
As if you might a bubble see,
As if it should a mirage be:
When thus you gaze upon the world
You’re not by Death’s great king observed.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 170 Look upon the world as a bubble, look upon it as a mirage: the king of death does not see him who thus looks down upon the world.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 170
As if one would see a bubble, as if one would see a mirage,
who observes the world like that, the King of Death does not see him. [DLMBSFn-V170]
Dhammapada Dhp. 171
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
171. Etha passathiraṃ lokaṃ cittaṃ rājarathūpamaṃ
Yattha bālā visīdanti natthi saṅgo vijānataṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
171. Etha passathimaṃ lokaṃ, cittaṃ rājarathūpamaṃ;
Yattha bālā visīdanti, natthi saṅgo vijānataṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE WISE ARE NOT ATTACHED TO THE WORLD

  1. Come, behold this world [NāradaFn13-05] which is like unto an ornamented royal chariot, wherein fools flounder, but for the wise there is no attachment.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 171. Come! Behold this world, which is like a decorated royal chariot. Here fools flounder, but the wise have no attachment to it.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

171

Come look at this world
all decked out
like a royal chariot,
where fools plunge in,
while those who know
  don't cling.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
171
Let’s gaze upon this pompous world
(A royal coach resplendent!)
In which the fools have settled down:
The wise have no attachment.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 171 Come, look at this glittering world, like unto a royal chariot; the foolish are immersed in it, but the wise do not touch it.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 171
Come and look at this world, similar to a beautiful king's chariot.
Where the fools sink down, for those, who understand, there is no attachment. [DLMBSFn-V171]
Dhammapada Dhp. 172
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
172. Yo ca pubbe pamajjitvā pacchā so nappamajjati
So imaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti abbhā mutto'va candimā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
172. Yo ca pubbe pamajjitvā, pacchā so nappamajjati;
Somaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti, abbhā muttova candimā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE HEEDFUL ILLUMINE THE WORLD

  1. Whoever was heedless before and afterwards is not; such a one illumines this world like the moon freed from clouds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 172. He who having been heedless is heedless no more, illuminates this world like the moon freed from clouds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

172-173

Who once was heedless,
but later is not,
  brightens the world
  like the moon set free from a cloud.

His evil-done deed
is replaced with skillfulness:
  he brightens the world
  like the moon set free from a cloud.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
172
Whoever though earlier negligent,
In passage of time became diligent,
Is one who throws light on the world,
Like the moon which from clouds has emerged.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 172 He who formerly was reckless and afterwards became sober, brightens up this world, like the moon when freed from clouds.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 172
Who has been formerly negligent, but later is not,
illuminates this world like a moon freed from cloud. [DLMBSFn-V172]
Dhammapada Dhp. 173
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
173. Yassa pāsaṃ kataṃ kammaṃ kusalena pithīyati
So imaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti abbhā mutto'va candimā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
173. Yassa pāpaṃ kataṃ kammaṃ, kusalena pidhīyati [pitīyati (sī. syā. pī.)];
Somaṃ lokaṃ pabhāseti, abbhā muttova candimā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

EVIL CAN BE ERASED BY GOOD

  1. Whoever, by a good deed, [NāradaFn13-06] covers the evil done, [NāradaFn13-07] such a one illumines this world like the moon freed from clouds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 173. He, who by good deeds covers the evil he has done, illuminates this world like the moon freed from clouds.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

172-173

Who once was heedless,
but later is not,
  brightens the world
  like the moon set free from a cloud.

His evil-done deed
is replaced with skillfulness:
  he brightens the world
  like the moon set free from a cloud.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
173
One guilty of past misdemeanour
Who shrouds it with skilful endeavour
Is one who throws light on the world,
Like the moon which from clouds has emerged.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 173 He whose evil deeds are covered by good deeds, brightens up this world, like the moon when freed from clouds.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 173
Who covers his evil deeds with good ones,
illuminates this world like a moon freed from cloud. [DLMBSFn-V173]
Dhammapada Dhp. 174
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
174. Andhabhūto ayaṃ loko tanukettha vipassati
Sakunto jālamutto'va appo saggāya gacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
174. Andhabhūto [andhībhūto (ka.)] ayaṃ loko, tanukettha vipassati;
Sakuṇo jālamuttova, appo saggāya gacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

FEW ARE THE CLEAR-SIGHTED

  1. Blind is this world. Few are those who clearly see. As birds escape from a net few go to a blissful state. [NāradaFn13-08]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 174. Blind is the world; here only a few possess insight. Only a few, like birds escaping from the net, go to realms of bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

174

Blinded this world —
how few here see clearly!
Just as birds who've escaped
  from a net are
  few, few
  are the people
who make it to heaven.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
174
Benighted is humanity:
How few there are that see!
As few men go to paradise
As birds from nets break free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 174 This world is dark, few only can see here; a few only go to heaven, like birds escaped from the net.
Dhammapada Dhp. 175
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
175. Haṃsādiccapathe yanti ākāse yanti iddhiyā
Niyyanti dhīrā lokamhā jitvā māraṃ savāhiniṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
175. Haṃsādiccapathe yanti, ākāse yanti iddhiyā;
Nīyanti dhīrā lokamhā, jetvā māraṃ savāhiniṃ [savāhanaṃ (syā. ka.)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE WISE SEEK AN ESCAPE FROM THIS WORLD

  1. Swans wing along on the path of the sun. (Men) go through air by psychic powers, [NāradaFn13-09] The wise are led away from the world, [NāradaFn13-10] having conquered Māra and his host. [NāradaFn13-11]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 175. Swans fly on the path of the sun; men pass through the air by psychic powers; the wise are led away from the world after vanquishing Mara and his host.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

175

Swans fly the path of the sun;
those with the power fly through space;
the enlightened flee from the world,
having defeated the armies of Mara.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
175
Swans wing their way on the sun’s westward path;
By their powers sublime, through the air, adepts pass.
The sages take leave of the worldly domain
Having Mara defeated, and all Mara’s train.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 175 The swans go on the path of the sun, they go through the ether by means of their miraculous power; the wise are led out of this world, when they have conquered Mara and his train.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 175
Swans travel on the path of the sun. People travel through space by supernatural powers.
Wise ones are guided away from the world, having conquered Mara with his army. [DLMBSFn-V175]
Dhammapada Dhp. 176
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
176. Ekaṃ dhammaṃ atītassa musāvādissa jantūno
Vitiṇṇaparalokassa natthi pāpaṃ akāriyaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
176. Ekaṃ dhammaṃ atītassa, musāvādissa jantuno;
Vitiṇṇaparalokassa, natthi pāpaṃ akāriyaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THERE IS NO EVIL THAT A LIAR CANNOT COMMIT

  1. There is no evil that cannot be done by the liar, [NāradaFn13-12] who has transgressed the one law (of truthfulness) and who is indifferent to a world beyond.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 176. For a liar who has violated the one law (of truthfulness) who holds in scorn the hereafter, there is no evil that he cannot do.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

176 [ThaniSFn-V176]

The person who tells a lie,
who transgresses in this one thing,
transcending concern for the world beyond:
  there's no evil
  he might not do.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
176
They who, in speaking, are guilty of falsity,
Flouting one virtue, the virtue of honesty -
Doubting the chance of an after-life destiny -
Won’t draw the line at a single iniquity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 176 If a man has transgressed one law, and speaks lies, and scoffs at another world, there is no evil he will not do.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 176
For the person, who has transgressed the one law (of truthfulness) and is speaking falsely,
and has rejected the other world, there is no evil that could not be done. [DLMBSFn-V176]
Dhammapada Dhp. 177
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
177. Na ve kadariyā devalokaṃ vajanti
bālā have nappasaṃsanti dānaṃ
Dhīro ca dānaṃ anumodamāno
Teneva so hoti sūkhī parattha.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
177. Na ve kadariyā devalokaṃ vajanti, bālā have nappasaṃsanti dānaṃ;
Dhīro ca dānaṃ anumodamāno, teneva so hoti sukhī parattha.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE STINGY ARE NOT HAPPY

  1. Verily misers go not to the celestial realms. Fools do not indeed praise liberality. The wise man rejoices in giving and thereby become happy thereafter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 177. Truly, misers fare not to heavenly realms; nor, indeed, do fools praise generosity. But the wise man rejoices in giving, and by that alone does he become happy hereafter.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

177

No misers go
to the world of the devas.
Those who don't praise giving
         are fools.
The enlightened
express their approval for giving
  and so find ease
  in the world beyond.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
177
To realms of the gods will proceed not the niggardly;
Fools, who don’t see this, do not extol charity.
Those who are prudent commend open-handedness;
Thus, after death, they are happy in consequence.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 177 The uncharitable do not go to the world of the gods; fools only do not praise liberality; a wise man rejoices in liberality, and through it becomes blessed in the other world.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 177
Selfish ones do not get to the world of the gods. Fools do not praise giving.
And the wise one enjoys giving. Just because of that he is happy hereafter. [DLMBSFn-V177]
Dhammapada Dhp. 178
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
178. Pathavyā ekarajjena saggassa gamanena vā178
Sabbalokādhipaccena sotāpattiphalaṃ varaṃ.

Lokavaggo terasamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
178. Pathabyā ekarajjena, saggassa gamanena vā;
Sabbalokādhipaccena, sotāpattiphalaṃ varaṃ.

Lokavaggo terasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

SPIRITUAL ADVANCEMENT IS BETTER THAN WORLDLY SOVEREIGNTY

  1. Better than absolute sovereignty [NāradaFn13-13] over the earth, better than going to heaven, better than even lordship over all the worlds, is the Fruit of a Stream-Winner. [NāradaFn13-14]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 178. Better than sole sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better even than lordship over all the worlds is the supramundane Fruition of Stream Entrance. [BudRkFn-v178]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

178 [ThaniSFn-V178]

Sole dominion over the earth,
going to heaven,
lordship over all worlds:
  the fruit of stream-entry
  excels them.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
178
Better than sovereignty over the earth,
Or finding in heaven a blessed rebirth,
Or ruling the cosmos with total authority,
Better than these is securing of stream-entry.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 178 Better than sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better than lordship over all worlds, is the reward of the first step in holiness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 178
From sole sovereignty over the earth, or from going to heaven,
from lordship over the whole world, the fruit of Entering the Stream is the best. [DLMBSFn-V178]
Dhammapada Dhp. 179
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Buddhavaggo.
179. Yassa jitaṃ nāvajīyati jitamassa no yāti koci loke
Tambuddhamanantagocaraṃ apadaṃ kena padena nessatha.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

14. Buddhavaggo

179. Yassa jitaṃ nāvajīyati, jitaṃ yassa [jitamassa (sī. syā. pī.), jitaṃ massa (ka.)] no yāti koci loke;
Taṃ buddhamanantagocaraṃ, apadaṃ kena padena nessatha.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 14 The Buddha

THE BUDDHA CANNOT BE FATHOMED

  1. Whose conquest (of passion) is not turned into defeat, [NāradaFn14-01] no conquered (passion) of his in this world follows him [NāradaFn14-02] - that trackless [NāradaFn14-03] Buddha of infinite range, [NāradaFn14-04] by which way will you lead him?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XIV The Buddha

179. By what track can you trace that trackless Buddha of limitless range, whose victory nothing can undo, whom none of the vanquished defilements can ever pursue?

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XIV Awakened

179-180

Whose conquest can't be undone,
whose conquest no one in the world
  can reach;
awakened, his pasture endless,
  pathless:
by what path will you lead him astray?

In whom there's no craving
 — the sticky ensnarer —
to lead him anywherever at all;
awakened, his pasture endless,
  pathless:
by what path will you lead him astray?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 14 The Buddha

179
The Buddha, whose victory is not overturned,
That hero no longer proceeds in the world;
Of limitless range, having left every way,
Then where is the track that could lead him astray?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XIV: The Buddha (The Awakened)

179 He whose conquest is not conquered again, into whose conquest no one in this world enters, by what track can you lead him, the Awakened, the Omniscient, the trackless?

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 14: The Buddha

DhP 179
Whose victory cannot be turned into defeat, nobody in the world can pursue his victory.
By what way will you destroy such an Awakened one, trackless and of endless sphere? [DLMBSFn-V179]
Dhammapada Dhp. 180
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
180. Yassa jālinī visattikā taṇhā natthi kuhiñci netave
Tambuddhamanantagocaraṃ apadaṃ kena padena nessatha.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
180. Yassa jālinī visattikā, taṇhā natthi kuhiñci netave;
Taṃ buddhamanantagocaraṃ, apadaṃ kena padena nessatha.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE BUDDHA IS PASSIONLESS

  1. Him in whom there is not that entangling, [NāradaFn14-05] embroiling craving to lead (to any life), him the trackless Buddha of infinite range - by which way will you lead him? [NāradaFn14-06]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 180. By what track can you trace that trackless Buddha of limitless range, in whom exists no longer, the entangling and embroiling craving that perpetuates becoming?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

179-180

Whose conquest can't be undone,
whose conquest no one in the world
  can reach;
awakened, his pasture endless,
  pathless:
by what path will you lead him astray?

In whom there's no craving
 — the sticky ensnarer —
to lead him anywherever at all;
awakened, his pasture endless,
  pathless:
by what path will you lead him astray?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
180
The Buddha is free of entangling affection,
And nowhere has left any cravings to lure him;
Of limitless range, having left every way,
Then where is the track that could lead him astray?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 180 He whom no desire with its snares and poisons can lead astray, by what track can you lead him, the Awakened, the Omniscient, the trackless?
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 180
Whose ensnaring craving and thirst that could carry him away does not exist anywhere,
by what way will you destroy such an Awakened one, trackless and of endless sphere? [DLMBSFn-V180]
Dhammapada Dhp. 181
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
181. Ye jhānapasutā dhīrā nekkhammūpasame ratā
Devā'pi tesaṃ pihayanti sambuddhānaṃ satīmataṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
181. Ye jhānapasutā dhīrā, nekkhammūpasame ratā;
Devāpi tesaṃ pihayanti, sambuddhānaṃ satīmataṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BUDDHAS ARE DEAR TO ALL

  1. The wise ones who are intent on meditation, [NāradaFn14-07] who delight in the peace of renunciation [NāradaFn14-08] (i.e., Nibbāna), such mindful perfect Buddhas even the gods hold (most) dear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 181. Those wise ones who are devoted to meditation and who delight in the calm of renunciation — such mindful ones, Supreme Buddhas, even the gods hold dear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

181

They, the enlightened, intent on jhana,
delighting in stilling
& renunciation,
self-awakened & mindful:
  even the devas
  view them with envy.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
181
Wise ones strive in meditation,
Joy- and peace-filled in seclusion,
Fully conscious, minds awakened,
Gods would wish their situation. [VaradoFn-V181]
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 181 Even the gods envy those who are awakened and not forgetful, who are given to meditation, who are wise, and who delight in the repose of retirement (from the world).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 181
The wise ones, who are intent upon meditation, delighting in renunciation and calm,
completely awakened and wakeful ones, even the gods do envy them. [DLMBSFn-V181]
Dhammapada Dhp. 182
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
182. Kiccho manussapaṭilābho kicchaṃ macchāna jīvitaṃ
Kicchaṃ saddhammasavanaṃ kiccho buddhānaṃ uppādo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
182. Kiccho manussapaṭilābho, kicchaṃ maccāna jīvitaṃ;
Kicchaṃ saddhammassavanaṃ, kiccho buddhānamuppādo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE GOOD ARE RARE

  1. Rare is birth as a human being. Hard is the life of mortals. Hard is the hearing of the Sublime Truth. Rare is the appearance of the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 182. Hard is it to be born a man; hard is the life of mortals. Hard is it to gain the opportunity of hearing the Sublime Truth, and hard to encounter is the arising of the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

182

Hard    the winning of a human birth.
Hard    the life of mortals.
Hard    the chance to hear the true Dhamma.
Hard    the arising of Awakened Ones.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
182
Rare the chance, the birth as man;
Hard to live, this mortal span;
Rare, to hear the Dhamma true;
Buddhas rising forth are few.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 182 Difficult (to obtain) is the conception of men, difficult is the life of mortals, difficult is the hearing of the True Law, difficult is the birth of the Awakened (the attainment of Buddhahood).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 182
Hard to get is the human birth; difficult is the life of a mortal.
Difficult is listening to the True Dharma; hard to come by is the appearance of the Awakened Ones. [DLMBSFn-V182]
Dhammapada Dhp. 183
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
183. Sabbapāpassa akaraṇaṃ kusalassa upasampadā
Sacittapariyodapanaṃ etaṃ buddhāna sāsanaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
183. Sabbapāpassa akaraṇaṃ, kusalassa upasampadā [kusalassūpasampadā (syā.)];
Sacittapariyodapanaṃ [sacittapariyodāpanaṃ (?)], etaṃ buddhāna sāsanaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DO GOOD AND BE GOOD

  1. Not to do any evil, [NāradaFn14-09] to cultivate good, to purify one's mind, this is the Teaching of the Buddhas. [NāradaFn14-10]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 183. To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

183-185 [ThaniSFn-V183-185]

The non-doing   of any evil,
the performance     of what's skillful,
the cleansing   of one's own mind:
  this is the teaching
  of the Awakened.

Patient endurance:
  the foremost austerity.
Unbinding:
  the foremost,
  so say the Awakened.
He who injures another
is no contemplative.
He who mistreats another,
  no monk.

Not disparaging, not injuring,
restraint   in line with the Patimokkha,
moderation  in food,
dwelling        in seclusion,
commitment  to the heightened mind:
  this is the teaching
  of the Awakened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
183
Undertake wholesomeness;
Shun every wickedness;
Purify consciousness:
All Buddhas’ teaching’s thus.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 183 Not to commit any sin, to do good, and to purify one's mind, that is the teaching of (all) the Awakened.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 183
Not doing the evil deeds,
Gathering the wholesome,
Purifying one's own mind -
That is teaching of the buddhas. [DLMBSFn-V183]
Dhammapada Dhp. 184
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
184. Khantī paramaṃ tapo titikkhā
Nibbāṇaṃ paramaṃ vadanti buddhā
Na hi pabbajito parūpaghātī
Samaṇo hoti paraṃ viheṭhayanto.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
184. Khantī paramaṃ tapo titikkhā, nibbānaṃ [nibbāṇaṃ (ka. sī. pī.)] paramaṃ vadanti buddhā;
Na hi pabbajito parūpaghātī, na [ayaṃ nakāro sī. syā. pī. pātthakesu na dissati] samaṇo hoti paraṃ viheṭhayanto.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NON-VIOLENCE IS THE CHARACTERISTIC OF AN ASCETIC

  1. Forbearing patience is the highest austerity. Nibbāna is supreme, say the Buddhas. He, verily, is not a recluse [NāradaFn14-11] who harms another. Nor is he an ascetic [NāradaFn14-12] who oppresses others.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 184. Enduring patience is the highest austerity. "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. He is not a true monk who harms another, nor a true renunciate who oppresses others.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

183-185 [ThaniSFn-V183-185]

The non-doing   of any evil,
the performance     of what's skillful,
the cleansing   of one's own mind:
  this is the teaching
  of the Awakened.

Patient endurance:
  the foremost austerity.
Unbinding:
  the foremost,
  so say the Awakened.
He who injures another
is no contemplative.
He who mistreats another,
  no monk.

Not disparaging, not injuring,
restraint   in line with the Patimokkha,
moderation  in food,
dwelling        in seclusion,
commitment  to the heightened mind:
  this is the teaching
  of the Awakened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
184 & 185

Patient perseverance
Is the finest of austerities.
Nibbana, say the Buddhas,
Is the greatest of all verities.
No recluse or monk is he
That hurts or causes injury.

Not insulting, not tormenting;
Governed by the codes of training;
Not excessive food consuming;
Isolated lodgings using;
Training mind with dedication:
This, the Buddhas’ dispensation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 184 The Awakened call patience the highest penance, long-suffering the highest Nirvana; for he is not an anchorite (pravragita) who strikes others, he is not an ascetic (sramana) who insults others.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 184
Patience and forgiveness is the highest ascetic practice.
The Awakened Ones say the Nirvana to be the highest.
A monk does not hurt others.
One, who harms others, is not a monk. [DLMBSFn-V184]
Dhammapada Dhp. 185
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
185. Anūpavādo anūpaghāto pātimokkhe ca saṃvaro
Mattaññutā ca bhattasmiṃ pantañca sayanāsanaṃ
Adhicitte ca āyogo etaṃ buddhāna sāsanaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
185. Anūpavādo anūpaghāto [anupavādo anupaghāto (syā. ka.)], pātimokkhe ca saṃvaro;
Mattaññutā ca bhattasmiṃ, pantañca sayanāsanaṃ;
Adhicitte ca āyogo, etaṃ buddhāna sāsanaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LEAD A PURE AND NOBLE LIFE

  1. Not insulting, not harming, restraint according to the Fundamental Moral Code, [NāradaFn14-13] moderation in food, secluded abode, intent on higher thoughts, [NāradaFn14-14] - this is the Teaching of the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 185. Not despising, not harming, restraint according to the code of monastic discipline, moderation in food, dwelling in solitude, devotion to meditation — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

183-185 [ThaniSFn-V183-185]

The non-doing   of any evil,
the performance     of what's skillful,
the cleansing   of one's own mind:
  this is the teaching
  of the Awakened.

Patient endurance:
  the foremost austerity.
Unbinding:
  the foremost,
  so say the Awakened.
He who injures another
is no contemplative.
He who mistreats another,
  no monk.

Not disparaging, not injuring,
restraint   in line with the Patimokkha,
moderation  in food,
dwelling        in seclusion,
commitment  to the heightened mind:
  this is the teaching
  of the Awakened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
184 & 185

Patient perseverance
Is the finest of austerities.
Nibbana, say the Buddhas,
Is the greatest of all verities.
No recluse or monk is he
That hurts or causes injury.

Not insulting, not tormenting;
Governed by the codes of training;
Not excessive food consuming;
Isolated lodgings using;
Training mind with dedication:
This, the Buddhas’ dispensation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 185 Not to blame, not to strike, to live restrained under the law, to be moderate in eating, to sleep and sit alone, and to dwell on the highest thoughts,--this is the teaching of the Awakened.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 185
Not speaking evil, not hurting, restraint in precepts,
moderation in food, solitary dwelling,
pursuing meditation - this is the teaching of the Buddhas. [DLMBSFn-V185]
Dhammapada Dhp. 186
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
186. Na kahāpaṇavassena titti kāmesu vijjati
Appassādā dukhā kāmā iti viññāya paṇḍito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
186. Na kahāpaṇavassena, titti kāmesu vijjati;
Appassādā dukhā kāmā, iti viññāya paṇḍito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

INSATIATE ARE SENSUAL PLEASURES

186-187. Not by a shower of gold coins does contentment arise in sensual pleasures. Of little sweetness, and painful, are sensual pleasures. Knowing thus, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Fully Enlightened One delights in the destruction of craving.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 186-187. There is no satisfying sensual desires, even with the rain of gold coins. For sensual pleasures give little satisfaction and much pain. Having understood this, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Supreme Buddha delights in the destruction of craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

186-187

Not even if it rained gold coins
would we have our fill
of sensual pleasures.
  'Stressful,
  they give little enjoyment' —
knowing this, the wise one
  finds no delight
even in heavenly sensual pleasures.
He is one who delights
  in the ending of craving,
  a disciple of the Rightly
  Self-Awakened One.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
186 & 187

Even a cloudburst of sovereigns would never
Allow one to have all one asks for of pleasure.
The one who goes hunting for sensual enjoyment
Finds little enchantment but much disappointment.

So, one who can see this, possessed of discretion,
Does not even covet the pleasures of heaven.
The Blessed One’s pupils pursue his instruction
And find their enjoyment in craving’s destruction.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 186 There is no satisfying lusts, even by a shower of gold pieces; he who knows that lusts have a short taste and cause pain, he is wise;
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 186
Even by rain of coins one cannot be satisfied in sensual desires.
The wise man, having understood that sensual desires give little pleasure and are painful,
[continued in DhP 187] [DLMBSFn-V186]
Dhammapada Dhp. 187
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
187. Api dibbesu kāmesu ratiṃ so nādhigacchati
Taṇhakkhayarato hoti sammāsambuddhasāvako.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
187. Api dibbesu kāmesu, ratiṃ so nādhigacchati;
Taṇhakkhayarato hoti, sammāsambuddhasāvako.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 186-187. Not by a shower of gold coins does contentment arise in sensual pleasures. Of little sweetness, and painful, are sensual pleasures. Knowing thus, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Fully Enlightened One delights in the destruction of craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 186-187. There is no satisfying sensual desires, even with the rain of gold coins. For sensual pleasures give little satisfaction and much pain. Having understood this, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Supreme Buddha delights in the destruction of craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

186-187

Not even if it rained gold coins
would we have our fill
of sensual pleasures.
  'Stressful,
  they give little enjoyment' —
knowing this, the wise one
  finds no delight
even in heavenly sensual pleasures.
He is one who delights
  in the ending of craving,
  a disciple of the Rightly
  Self-Awakened One.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
186 & 187

Even a cloudburst of sovereigns would never
Allow one to have all one asks for of pleasure.
The one who goes hunting for sensual enjoyment
Finds little enchantment but much disappointment.

So, one who can see this, possessed of discretion,
Does not even covet the pleasures of heaven.
The Blessed One’s pupils pursue his instruction
And find their enjoyment in craving’s destruction.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 187 Even in heavenly pleasures he finds no satisfaction, the disciple who is fully awakened delights only in the destruction of all desires.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 187
[continued from DhP 186]
he does not find liking even for divine pleasures.
A student of the truly and completely Awakened One is devoted to destruction of cravings. [DLMBSFn-V187]
Dhammapada Dhp. 188
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
188. Bahū ve saraṇaṃ yanti pabbatāni vanāni ca
Ārāmarukkhacetyāni manussā bhayatajjitā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
188. Bahuṃ ve saraṇaṃ yanti, pabbatāni vanāni ca;
Ārāmarukkhacetyāni, manussā bhayatajjitā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

RELEASE FROM SUFFERING IS GAINED BY SEEKING REFUGE IN THE BUDDHA, DHAMMA AND THE SANGHA

  1. To many a refuge fear-stricken men betake themselves - to hills, woods, groves, trees, and shrines.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 188. Driven only by fear, do men go for refuge to many places — to hills, woods, groves, trees and shrines.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

188-192

They go to many a refuge,
  to mountains and forests,
  to park and tree shrines:
people threatened with danger.
That's not the secure refuge,
  not the supreme refuge,
that's not the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.

  But when, having gone
to the Buddha, Dhamma,
& Sangha for refuge,
you see with right discernment
the four noble truths —
                     stress,
         the cause of stress,
  the transcending of stress,
& the noble eightfold path,
  the way to the stilling of stress:
that's the secure refuge,
that, the supreme refuge,
that is the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
188-192

In a dangerous plight,
The faint-hearted take flight,
For a refuge to run to,
Distracted by fright.

To the shrines and pagodas
And mountains they flee;
To the jungles and meadows
And sanctified trees.

But unfit are such places
As havens of safety,
And none can be deemed
As a refuge supreme.

For although they may reach
Such secluded retreats,
They would not from their sorrows
Be utterly freed.

Thus, whoever dismayed
Wants a refuge supreme,
To the Buddha and Dhamma
And Sangha should flee,

And with wisdom direct
Should on Four Truths reflect,
Which are: Sorrows reality,
Sorrow’s causality,
Sorrow’s transcendence
And Eightfold Modality.

These are, indeed,
The protections supreme.
Having realised such safety
From sorrow one’s free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 188 Men, driven by fear, go to many a refuge, to mountains and forests, to groves and sacred trees.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 188
People, driven by fear, go for the refuge to many places:
mountains, forests, gardens, trees and shrines. [DLMBSFn-V188]
Dhammapada Dhp. 189
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
189. Netaṃ kho saraṇaṃ khemaṃ netaṃ saraṇamuttamaṃ
Netaṃ saraṇamāgamma sabbadukkhā pamuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
189. Netaṃ kho saraṇaṃ khemaṃ, netaṃ saraṇamuttamaṃ;
Netaṃ saraṇamāgamma, sabbadukkhā pamuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Nay no such refuge is safe, no such refuge is supreme. Not by resorting to such a refuge is one freed from all ill.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 189. Such, indeed, is no safe refuge; such is not the refuge supreme. Not by resorting to such a refuge is one released from all suffering.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

188-192

They go to many a refuge,
  to mountains and forests,
  to park and tree shrines:
people threatened with danger.
That's not the secure refuge,
  not the supreme refuge,
that's not the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.

  But when, having gone
to the Buddha, Dhamma,
& Sangha for refuge,
you see with right discernment
the four noble truths —
                     stress,
         the cause of stress,
  the transcending of stress,
& the noble eightfold path,
  the way to the stilling of stress:
that's the secure refuge,
that, the supreme refuge,
that is the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
188-192

In a dangerous plight,
The faint-hearted take flight,
For a refuge to run to,
Distracted by fright.

To the shrines and pagodas
And mountains they flee;
To the jungles and meadows
And sanctified trees.

But unfit are such places
As havens of safety,
And none can be deemed
As a refuge supreme.

For although they may reach
Such secluded retreats,
They would not from their sorrows
Be utterly freed.

Thus, whoever dismayed
Wants a refuge supreme,
To the Buddha and Dhamma
And Sangha should flee,

And with wisdom direct
Should on Four Truths reflect,
Which are: Sorrows reality,
Sorrow’s causality,
Sorrow’s transcendence
And Eightfold Modality.

These are, indeed,
The protections supreme.
Having realised such safety
From sorrow one’s free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 189 But that is not a safe refuge, that is not the best refuge; a man is not delivered from all pains after having gone to that refuge.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 189
This refuge is not safe; this refuge is not supreme.
Having come to such a refuge, one will not be free from all suffering. [DLMBSFn-V189]
Dhammapada Dhp. 190
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
190. Yo ca buddhañca dhammañca saṅghañca saraṇaṃ gato
cattāri ariyasaccāni sammappaññāya passati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
190. Yo ca buddhañca dhammañca, saṅghañca saraṇaṃ gato;
Cattāri ariyasaccāni, sammappaññāya passati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 190-192. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Sangha, sees with right knowledge the four Noble Truths - Sorrow, the Cause of Sorrow, the Transcending of Sorrow, and the Noble Eightfold Path which leads to the Cessation of Sorrow. This, indeed, is refuge secure. This, indeed, is refuge supreme. By seeking such refuge one is released from all sorrow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 190-191. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Teaching and his Order, penetrates with transcendental wisdom the Four Noble Truths — suffering, the cause of suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the Noble Eightfold Path leading to the cessation of suffering. [BudRkFn-v190-191]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

188-192

They go to many a refuge,
  to mountains and forests,
  to park and tree shrines:
people threatened with danger.
That's not the secure refuge,
  not the supreme refuge,
that's not the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.

  But when, having gone
to the Buddha, Dhamma,
& Sangha for refuge,
you see with right discernment
the four noble truths —
                     stress,
         the cause of stress,
  the transcending of stress,
& the noble eightfold path,
  the way to the stilling of stress:
that's the secure refuge,
that, the supreme refuge,
that is the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
188-192

In a dangerous plight,
The faint-hearted take flight,
For a refuge to run to,
Distracted by fright.

To the shrines and pagodas
And mountains they flee;
To the jungles and meadows
And sanctified trees.

But unfit are such places
As havens of safety,
And none can be deemed
As a refuge supreme.

For although they may reach
Such secluded retreats,
They would not from their sorrows
Be utterly freed.

Thus, whoever dismayed
Wants a refuge supreme,
To the Buddha and Dhamma
And Sangha should flee,

And with wisdom direct
Should on Four Truths reflect,
Which are: Sorrows reality,
Sorrow’s causality,
Sorrow’s transcendence
And Eightfold Modality.

These are, indeed,
The protections supreme.
Having realised such safety
From sorrow one’s free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 190 He who takes refuge with Buddha, the Law, and the Church; he who, with clear understanding, sees the four holy truths:--
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 190
And who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha,
sees with a true wisdom Four Noble Truths. [DLMBSFn-V190]
Dhammapada Dhp. 191
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
191. Dukkhaṃ dukkhasamuppādaṃ dukkhassa ca atikkamaṃ
Ariyañcaṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ dukkhūpasamagāminaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
191. Dukkhaṃ dukkhasamuppādaṃ, dukkhassa ca atikkamaṃ;
Ariyaṃ caṭṭhaṅgikaṃ maggaṃ, dukkhūpasamagāminaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 190-192. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Sangha, sees with right knowledge the four Noble Truths - Sorrow, the Cause of Sorrow, the Transcending of Sorrow, and the Noble Eightfold Path which leads to the Cessation of Sorrow. This, indeed, is refuge secure. This, indeed, is refuge supreme. By seeking such refuge one is released from all sorrow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 190-191. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Teaching and his Order, penetrates with transcendental wisdom the Four Noble Truths — suffering, the cause of suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the Noble Eightfold Path leading to the cessation of suffering. [BudRkFn-v190-191]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

188-192 [ThaniSFn-V191]

They go to many a refuge,
  to mountains and forests,
  to park and tree shrines:
people threatened with danger.
That's not the secure refuge,
  not the supreme refuge,
that's not the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.

  But when, having gone
to the Buddha, Dhamma,
& Sangha for refuge,
you see with right discernment
the four noble truths —
                     stress,
         the cause of stress,
  the transcending of stress,
& the noble eightfold path,
  the way to the stilling of stress:
that's the secure refuge,
that, the supreme refuge,
that is the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
188-192

In a dangerous plight,
The faint-hearted take flight,
For a refuge to run to,
Distracted by fright.

To the shrines and pagodas
And mountains they flee;
To the jungles and meadows
And sanctified trees.

But unfit are such places
As havens of safety,
And none can be deemed
As a refuge supreme.

For although they may reach
Such secluded retreats,
They would not from their sorrows
Be utterly freed.

Thus, whoever dismayed
Wants a refuge supreme,
To the Buddha and Dhamma
And Sangha should flee,

And with wisdom direct
Should on Four Truths reflect,
Which are: Sorrows reality,
Sorrow’s causality,
Sorrow’s transcendence
And Eightfold Modality.

These are, indeed,
The protections supreme.
Having realised such safety
From sorrow one’s free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 191 Viz. pain, the origin of pain, the destruction of pain, and the eightfold holy way that leads to the quieting of pain;--
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 191
Suffering, origin of suffering, overcoming of suffering,
and the noble eightfold path, leading to appeasement of suffering. [DLMBSFn-V191]
Dhammapada Dhp. 192
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
192. Etaṃ kho saraṇaṃ khemaṃ etaṃ saraṇamuttamaṃ
Etaṃ saraṇamāgamma sabbadukkhā pamuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
192. Etaṃ kho saraṇaṃ khemaṃ, etaṃ saraṇamuttamaṃ;
Etaṃ saraṇamāgamma, sabbadukkhā pamuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 190-192. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Sangha, sees with right knowledge the four Noble Truths - Sorrow, the Cause of Sorrow, the Transcending of Sorrow, and the Noble Eightfold Path which leads to the Cessation of Sorrow. This, indeed, is refuge secure. This, indeed, is refuge supreme. By seeking such refuge one is released from all sorrow.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 192. This indeed is the safe refuge, this the refuge supreme. Having gone to such a refuge, one is released from all suffering.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

188-192

They go to many a refuge,
  to mountains and forests,
  to park and tree shrines:
people threatened with danger.
That's not the secure refuge,
  not the supreme refuge,
that's not the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.

  But when, having gone
to the Buddha, Dhamma,
& Sangha for refuge,
you see with right discernment
the four noble truths —
                     stress,
         the cause of stress,
  the transcending of stress,
& the noble eightfold path,
  the way to the stilling of stress:
that's the secure refuge,
that, the supreme refuge,
that is the refuge,
having gone to which,
  you gain release
  from all suffering & stress.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
188-192

In a dangerous plight,
The faint-hearted take flight,
For a refuge to run to,
Distracted by fright.

To the shrines and pagodas
And mountains they flee;
To the jungles and meadows
And sanctified trees.

But unfit are such places
As havens of safety,
And none can be deemed
As a refuge supreme.

For although they may reach
Such secluded retreats,
They would not from their sorrows
Be utterly freed.

Thus, whoever dismayed
Wants a refuge supreme,
To the Buddha and Dhamma
And Sangha should flee,

And with wisdom direct
Should on Four Truths reflect,
Which are: Sorrows reality,
Sorrow’s causality,
Sorrow’s transcendence
And Eightfold Modality.

These are, indeed,
The protections supreme.
Having realised such safety
From sorrow one’s free.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 192 That is the safe refuge, that is the best refuge; having gone to that refuge, a man is delivered from all pain.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 192
This refuge is safe; this refuge is supreme.
Having come to such a refuge, one will be free from all suffering. [DLMBSFn-V192]
Dhammapada Dhp. 193
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
193. Dullabho purisājañño na so sabbattha jāyati
Yattha so jāyati dhīro taṃ kūlaṃ sukhamedhati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
193. Dullabho purisājañño, na so sabbattha jāyati;
Yattha so jāyati dhīro, taṃ kulaṃ sukhamedhati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE NOBLE ARE RARE

  1. Hard to find is a man of great wisdom: such a man is not born everywhere. Where such a wise man is born, that family thrives happily.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 193. Hard to find is the thoroughbred man (the Buddha); he is not born everywhere. Where such a wise man is born, that clan thrives happily.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

193

It's hard to come by
  a thoroughbred of a man.
It's simply not true
  that he's born everywhere.
Wherever he's born, an enlightened one,
the family prospers,
     is happy.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
193
It’s hard to discover a man of real quality;
Such are not born in just any locality.
Countries where sages have found their nativity,
People thereof come to happy prosperity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 193 A supernatural person (a Buddha) is not easily found, he is not born everywhere. Wherever such a sage is born, that race prospers.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 193
Hard to find is a noble person. He is not born everywhere.
Where is such a wise one born, that family prospers happily. [DLMBSFn-V193]
Dhammapada Dhp. 194
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
194. Sukho buddhānaṃ uppādo sukhā saddhammadesanā
Sukhā saṅghassa sāmaggi samaggānaṃ tapo sukho.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
194. Sukho buddhānamuppādo, sukhā saddhammadesanā;
Sukhā saṅghassa sāmaggī, samaggānaṃ tapo sukho.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THINGS THAT TEND TO HAPPINESS

  1. Happy is the birth of Buddhas. Happy is the teaching of the sublime Dhamma. Happy is the unity of the Sangha. [NāradaFn14-17] Happy is the discipline of the united ones.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 194. Blessed is the birth of the Buddhas; blessed is the enunciation of the sacred Teaching; blessed is the harmony in the Order, and blessed is the spiritual pursuit of the united truth-seeker.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

194

A blessing:     the arising of Awakened Ones.
A blessing:     the teaching of true Dhamma.
A blessing:     the concord of the Sangha.
The austerity of those in concord
     is a blessing.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
194
How delightful is the advent of the Buddhas;
How delightful is the teaching of the Dhamma;
In the Sangha, how delightful solidarity;
In concord, how delightful our austerity!
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 194 Happy is the arising of the awakened, happy is the teaching of the True Law, happy is peace in the church, happy is the devotion of those who are at peace.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 194
Happy is birth of the Awakened Ones. Happy is teaching of the True Dharma.
Happy is unity of the Sangha. Happy is meditation of those in unity. [DLMBSFn-V194]
Dhammapada Dhp. 195
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
195. Pūjārahe pūjayato buddhe yadi va sāvake
Papañca samatikkante tiṇṇasokapariddave.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
195. Pūjārahe pūjayato, buddhe yadi va sāvake;
Papañcasamatikkante, tiṇṇasokapariddave.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HONOUR TO WHOM HONOUR IS DUE

195-196. He who reverences those worthy of reverence, whether Buddhas or their disciples; those who have overcome the impediments [NāradaFn14-18] and have got rid of grief and lamentation - the merit of him who reverences such peaceful [NāradaFn14-19] and fearless Ones [NāradaFn14-20] cannot be measured by anyone as such and such.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 195-196. He who reveres those worthy of reverence, the Buddhas and their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond the reach of sorrow and lamentation — he who reveres such peaceful and fearless ones, his merit none can compute by any measure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

195-196 [ThaniSFn-V195-196]

If you worship those worthy of worship,
 — Awakened Ones or their disciples —
who've transcended
  objectifications,
  lamentation,
  & grief,
who are unendangered,
  fearless,
  unbound:
there's no measure for reckoning
that your merit's 'this much.'
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
195 & 196

To those who are worthy, whoever gives reverence,
To Buddhas, and monks who have cleared the impediments,
Crossed over grief and traversed lamentation,
Those safe from all quarters, who’ve reached liberation:
The greatness of merit from honouring such,
Can by no one be fixed at ‘just this-or-that much’.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 195, 196. He who pays homage to those who deserve homage, whether the awakened (Buddha) or their disciples, those who have overcome the host (of evils), and crossed the flood of sorrow, he who pays homage to such as have found deliverance and know no fear, his merit can never be measured by anybody.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 195
Who pays respects to those worthy of it, The Awakened Ones or their disciples,
who have gone beyond obstacles and overcame grief and sorrow,
[continued in DhP 196]. [DLMBSFn-V195]
Dhammapada Dhp. 196
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
196. Te tādise pūjayato nibbute akutobhaye
Na sakkā puññaṃ saṅkhātuṃ imettamapi kenaci.

Cuddasamo buddhavaggo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
196. Te tādise pūjayato, nibbute akutobhaye;
Na sakkā puññaṃ saṅkhātuṃ, imettamapi kenaci.

Buddhavaggo cuddasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 195-196. He who reverences those worthy of reverence, whether Buddhas or their disciples; those who have overcome the impediments [NāradaFn14-18] and have got rid of grief and lamentation - the merit of him who reverences such peaceful [NāradaFn14-19] and fearless Ones [NāradaFn14-20] cannot be measured by anyone as such and such.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 195-196. He who reveres those worthy of reverence, the Buddhas and their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond the reach of sorrow and lamentation — he who reveres such peaceful and fearless ones, his merit none can compute by any measure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

195-196 [ThaniSFn-V195-196]

If you worship those worthy of worship,
 — Awakened Ones or their disciples —
who've transcended
  objectifications,
  lamentation,
  & grief,
who are unendangered,
  fearless,
  unbound:
there's no measure for reckoning
that your merit's 'this much.'
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
195 & 196

To those who are worthy, whoever gives reverence,
To Buddhas, and monks who have cleared the impediments,
Crossed over grief and traversed lamentation,
Those safe from all quarters, who’ve reached liberation:
The greatness of merit from honouring such,
Can by no one be fixed at ‘just this-or-that much’.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 195, 196. He who pays homage to those who deserve homage, whether the awakened (Buddha) or their disciples, those who have overcome the host (of evils), and crossed the flood of sorrow, he who pays homage to such as have found deliverance and know no fear, his merit can never be measured by anybody.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 196
[continued from DhP 195].
Those who pay respects to such emancipated and fearless ones,
nobody is able to calculate their merit as such and such. [DLMBSFn-V196]
Dhammapada Dhp. 197
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Sukhavaggo.
197. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma verinesu averino
Verinesu manussesu viharāma averino.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

15. Sukhavaggo

197. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma, verinesu averino;
Verinesu manussesu, viharāma averino.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 15 Happiness

AMONGST THE HATEFUL BE WITHOUT HATE   AMONGST THE SICK BE IN GOOD HEALTH   AMONGST THE PASSIONATE BE WITHOUT PASSION

  1. Ah, happily do we live without hate amongst the hateful; amidst hateful men we dwell unhating.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XV Happiness

197. Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the hostile. Amidst hostile men we dwell free from hatred.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XV Happy

197-200

How very happily we live,
free from hostility
among those who are hostile.
Among hostile people,
free from hostility we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from misery
among those who are miserable.
Among miserable people,
free from misery we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from busyness
among those who are busy.
Among busy people,
free from busyness we dwell.

How very happily we live,
we who have nothing.
We will feed on rapture
like the Radiant gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 15 Happiness

197
‘Midst those with animosity,
Those seething with antipathy,
Indeed, we live on happily,
Well wishing and kind heartedly.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XV: Happiness

197 Let us live happily then, not hating those who hate us! among men who hate us let us dwell free from hatred!

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 15: The Happiness

DhP 197
Very happily indeed we live, free of hatred amongst hateful.
Amongst hateful people we dwell without hatred. [DLMBSFn-V197]
Dhammapada Dhp. 198
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
198. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma āturesu anāturā
Āturesu manussesu viharāma anāturā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
198. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma, āturesu anāturā;
Āturesu manussesu, viharāma anāturā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Ah, happily do we live in good health [NāradaFn15-01] amongst the ailing; amidst ailing men we dwell in good health.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 198. Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the afflicted (by craving). Amidst afflicted men we dwell free from affliction.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

197-200

How very happily we live,
free from hostility
among those who are hostile.
Among hostile people,
free from hostility we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from misery
among those who are miserable.
Among miserable people,
free from misery we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from busyness
among those who are busy.
Among busy people,
free from busyness we dwell.

How very happily we live,
we who have nothing.
We will feed on rapture
like the Radiant gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
198
‘Midst sick-at-heart humanity,
Their consciousness in malady,
Indeed, we live on happily,
In deepest health and sanity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 198 Let us live happily then, free from ailments among the ailing! among men who are ailing let us dwell free from ailments!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 198
Very happily indeed we live, healthy amongst diseased ones.
Amongst diseased people we dwell healthy. [DLMBSFn-V198]
Dhammapada Dhp. 199
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
199. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma ussūkesu anussukā
Ussukesu manussesu viharāma anussukā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
199. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma, ussukesu anussukā;
Ussukesu manassesu, viharāma anussukā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Ah, happily do we live without yearning (for sensual pleasures) amongst those who yearn (for them); amidst those who yearn (for them) we dwell without yearning.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 199. Happy indeed we live, free from avarice amidst the avaricious. Amidst the avaricious men we dwell free from avarice.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

197-200

How very happily we live,
free from hostility
among those who are hostile.
Among hostile people,
free from hostility we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from misery
among those who are miserable.
Among miserable people,
free from misery we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from busyness
among those who are busy.
Among busy people,
free from busyness we dwell.

How very happily we live,
we who have nothing.
We will feed on rapture
like the Radiant gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
199
‘Midst those who crave insatiably,
Desiring things voraciously,
Indeed, we live on happily,
Indifferent and contentedly.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 199 Let us live happily then, free from greed among the greedy! among men who are greedy let us dwell free from greed!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 199
Very happily indeed we live, without greed amongst greedy ones.
Amongst greedy people we dwell without greed. [DLMBSFn-V199]
Dhammapada Dhp. 200
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
200. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma yesaṃ no natthi kiñcanaṃ
Pītibhakkhā bhavissāma devā ābhassarā yathā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
200. Susukhaṃ vata jīvāma, yesaṃ no natthi kiñcanaṃ;
Pītibhakkhā bhavissāma, devā ābhassarā yathā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE WITHOUT IMPEDIMENTS

  1. Ah, happily do we live we who have no impediments. [NāradaFn15-02] Feeders of joy shall we be even as the gods of the Radiant Realm.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 200. Happy indeed we live, we who possess nothing. Feeders on joy we shall be, like the Radiant Gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

197-200

How very happily we live,
free from hostility
among those who are hostile.
Among hostile people,
free from hostility we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from misery
among those who are miserable.
Among miserable people,
free from misery we dwell.

How very happily we live,
free from busyness
among those who are busy.
Among busy people,
free from busyness we dwell.

How very happily we live,
we who have nothing.
We will feed on rapture
like the Radiant gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
200
How happily, here,
Do we our days fill!
Possessionless, we,
The owners of nil.

We’ll feed on our joy;
We’ll live on delight;
Like the Radiant Gods
In the heavens of light.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 200 Let us live happily then, though we call nothing our own! We shall be like the bright gods, feeding on happiness!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 200
Very happily indeed we live, who have nothing whatsoever.
We will be feeding on joy, just like the Radiant Gods. [DLMBSFn-V200]
Dhammapada Dhp. 201
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
201. Jayaṃ veraṃ pasavati dukkhaṃ seti parājito
Upasanto sukhaṃ seti hatmā jayaparājayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
201. Jayaṃ veraṃ pasavati, dukkhaṃ seti parājito;
Upasanto sukhaṃ seti, hitvā jayaparājayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

VICTORY BREEDS HATRED

  1. Victory breeds hatred. The defeated live in pain. Happily the peaceful live, giving up victory and defeat.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 201. Victory begets enmity; the defeated dwell in pain. Happily the peaceful live, discarding both victory and defeat.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

201

Winning gives birth to hostility.
Losing, one lies down in pain.
The calmed lie down with ease,
  having set
  winning & losing
     aside.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
201
From triumph grows antipathy;
The conquered sleep in misery.
The calmed ones slumber blissfully;
They’ve spurned defeat and victory.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 201 Victory breeds hatred, for the conquered is unhappy. He who has given up both victory and defeat, he, the contented, is happy.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 201
Victory produces hatred. Defeated one dwells in pain.
Tranquil one dwells happily, having renounced both victory and defeat. [DLMBSFn-V201]
Dhammapada Dhp. 202
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
202. Natthi rāgasamo aggi natthi dosasamo kali
Natthi khandhasamā dukkhā katthi santiparaṃ sukhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
202. Natthi rāgasamo aggi, natthi dosasamo kali;
Natthi khandhasamā [khandhādisā (sī. syā. pī. rūpasiddhiyā sameti)] dukkhā, natthi santiparaṃ sukhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LUST IS A FIRE

  1. There is no fire like lust, no crime like hate. There is no ill like the body, [NāradaFn15-03] no bliss higher than Peace (Nibbāna).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 202. There is no fire like lust and no crime like hatred. There is no ill like the aggregates (of existence) and no bliss higher than the peace (of Nibbana). [BudRkFn-v202]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

202-204

There's no fire like passion,
no loss like anger,
no pain like the aggregates,
no ease other than peace.

Hunger: the foremost illness.
Fabrications: the foremost pain.
For one knowing this truth
as it actually is,
  Unbinding
is the foremost ease.

Freedom from illness: the foremost good fortune.
Contentment: the foremost wealth.
Trust: the foremost kinship.
Unbinding: the foremost ease.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
202
There’s no blaze like desire;
No misfortune like ire;
Like the khandhas, no stress;
Like appeasement, no bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 202 There is no fire like passion; there is no losing throw like hatred; there is no pain like this body; there is no happiness higher than rest.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 202
There is no fire like passion. There is no evil like hatred.
There is no suffering like the Aggregates of existence. There is no happiness higher than tranquility. [DLMBSFn-V202]
Dhammapada Dhp. 203
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
203. Jighacchāparamā rogā saṅkhāraparamā dukhā
Etaṃ ñatvā yathābhūtaṃ nibbāṇaparamaṃ sukhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
203. Jighacchāparamā rogā, saṅkhāraparamā [saṅkārā paramā (bahūsu)] dukhā;
Etaṃ ñatvā yathābhūtaṃ, nibbānaṃ paramaṃ sukhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HUNGER IS THE GREATEST AFFLICTION

  1. Hunger [NāradaFn15-04] is the greatest disease. Aggregates [NāradaFn15-05] are the greatest ill. Knowing this as it really is, (the wise realize) Nibbāna, bliss supreme.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 203. Hunger is the worst disease, conditioned things the worst suffering. Knowing this as it really is, the wise realize Nibbana, the highest bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

202-204

There's no fire like passion,
no loss like anger,
no pain like the aggregates,
no ease other than peace.

Hunger: the foremost illness.
Fabrications: the foremost pain.
For one knowing this truth
as it actually is,
  Unbinding
is the foremost ease.

Freedom from illness: the foremost good fortune.
Contentment: the foremost wealth.
Trust: the foremost kinship.
Unbinding: the foremost ease.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
203
Hunger is the primary disease; conditioned phenomena, the primary suffering. Having seen the truth of this, Nibbana becomes the primary happiness.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 203 Hunger is the worst of diseases, the body the greatest of pains; if one knows this truly, that is Nirvana, the highest happiness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 203
Hunger is the highest illness. Conditioned things are the highest suffering.
Having known this as it is, Nirvana is the highest happiness. [DLMBSFn-V203]
Dhammapada Dhp. 204
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
204. Ārogyaparamā lābhā santuṭṭhiparamaṃ dhanaṃ
Vissāsaparamā ñātī nibbāṇaparamaṃ sukhaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
204. Ārogyaparamā lābhā, santuṭṭhiparamaṃ dhanaṃ;
Vissāsaparamā ñāti [vissāsaparamo ñāti (ka. sī.), vissāsaparamā ñātī (sī. aṭṭha.), vissāsā paramā ñāti (ka.)], nibbānaṃ paramaṃ [nibbāṇaparamaṃ (ka. sī.)] sukhaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HEALTH IS PARAMOUNT

  1. Health is the highest gain. Contentment is the greatest wealth. The trusty [NāradaFn15-06] are the best kinsmen. Nibbāna is the highest bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 204. Health is the most precious gain and contentment the greatest wealth. A trustworthy person is the best kinsman, Nibbana the highest bliss.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

202-204

There's no fire like passion,
no loss like anger,
no pain like the aggregates,
no ease other than peace.

Hunger: the foremost illness.
Fabrications: the foremost pain.
For one knowing this truth
as it actually is,
  Unbinding
is the foremost ease.

Freedom from illness: the foremost good fortune.
Contentment: the foremost wealth.
Trust: the foremost kinship.
Unbinding: the foremost ease.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
204
Above all gains, the best is health;
Contentment ranks as greatest wealth.
The loyal friend is kin that’s best;
Of all, Nibbana stands most blest.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 204 Health is the greatest of gifts, contentedness the best riches; trust is the best of relationships, Nirvana the highest happiness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 204
Health is the highest gain. Contentment is the highest wealth.
Trusted people are the best relatives. Nirvana is the highest happiness. [DLMBSFn-V204]
Dhammapada Dhp. 205
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
205. Pavivekarasaṃ pītvā rasaṃ upasamassa ca
Niddaro hoti nippāpo dhammapītirasaṃ pibaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
205. Pavivekarasaṃ pitvā [pītvā (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)], rasaṃ upasamassa ca;
Niddaro hoti nippāpo, dhammapītirasaṃ pivaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HAPPY IS HE WHO TASTES THE FLAVOUR OF TRUTH

  1. Having tasted the flavour of seclusion and the flavour of appeasement, [NāradaFn15-07] free from anguish and stain becomes he, imbibing the taste of the joy of the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 205. Having savored the taste of solitude and peace (of Nibbana), pain-free and stainless he becomes, drinking deep the taste of the bliss of the Truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

205

Drinking the nourishment,
  the flavor,
of seclusion & calm,
one is freed from evil, devoid
  of distress,
refreshed with the nourishment
of rapture in the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
205
Having tasted the sweet of seclusion,
And savoured the taste of tranquillity,
Dhamma’s ambrosia and joy may you drink,
And be free of distress and iniquity!
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 205 He who has tasted the sweetness of solitude and tranquillity, is free from fear and free from sin, while he tastes the sweetness of drinking in the law.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 205
Having drunk the nectar of solitude and the nectar of tranquility,
one is free of fear and free of evil, drinking the nectar of the joy of Dharma. [DLMBSFn-V205]
Dhammapada Dhp. 206
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
206. Sāhu dassanamariyānaṃ sannivāso sadā sukho
Adassanena bālānaṃ niccameva sukhī siyā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
206. Sāhu dassanamariyānaṃ, sannivāso sadā sukho;
Adassanena bālānaṃ, niccameva sukhī siyā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BLESSED IS THE SIGHT OF THE NOBLE   SORROWFUL IS ASSOCIATION WITH THE FOOLISH   ASSOCIATE WITH THE WISE

  1. Good is the sight of the Ariyas: their company is ever happy. Not seeing the foolish, one may ever be happy.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 206. Good is it to see the Noble Ones; to live with them is ever blissful. One will always be happy by not encountering fools.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

206-208

It's good to see Noble Ones.
Happy their company — always.
Through not seeing fools
constantly, constantly
  one would be happy.

For, living with a fool,
one grieves a long time.
Painful is communion with fools,
as with an enemy —
  always.
Happy is communion
with the enlightened,
as with a gathering of kin.

  So:
the enlightened man —
discerning, learned,
enduring, dutiful, noble,
intelligent, a man of integrity:
  follow him
  — one of this sort —
  as the moon, the path
  of the zodiac stars.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
206
How blessed, the sight of accomplished disciples!
Companionship, ever, with them is delightful.
If ignorant people one never should see,
How endlessly pleasant, indeed, would it be!
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 206 The sight of the elect (Arya) is good, to live with them is always happiness; if a man does not see fools, he will be truly happy.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 206
Good is seeing the Noble Ones; association with them is always happy.
By not seeing fools on would always be happy. [DLMBSFn-V206]
Dhammapada Dhp. 207
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
207. Bālasaṅgatacārīhi dīghamaddhāna socati
Dukkho bālehi saṃvāso amitteneva sabbadā
Dhīro ca sukhasaṃvāso ñātīnaṃ'va samāgamo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
207. Bālasaṅgatacārī [bālasaṅgaticārī (ka.)] hi, dīghamaddhāna socati;
Dukkho bālehi saṃvāso, amitteneva sabbadā;
Dhīro ca sukhasaṃvāso, ñātīnaṃva samāgamo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Truly he who moves in company with fools grieves for a long time. Association with the foolish is ever painful as with a foe. Happy is association with the wise, even like meeting with kinsfolk.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 207. Indeed, he who moves in the company of fools grieves for longing. Association with fools is ever painful, like partnership with an enemy. But association with the wise is happy, like meeting one's own kinsmen.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

206-208

It's good to see Noble Ones.
Happy their company — always.
Through not seeing fools
constantly, constantly
  one would be happy.

For, living with a fool,
one grieves a long time.
Painful is communion with fools,
as with an enemy —
  always.
Happy is communion
with the enlightened,
as with a gathering of kin.

  So:
the enlightened man —
discerning, learned,
enduring, dutiful, noble,
intelligent, a man of integrity:
  follow him
  — one of this sort —
  as the moon, the path
  of the zodiac stars.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
207
A woman will grieve for a very long time
If she moves in the circle of people unwise;
For it ever is so, that to live with a fool
Is as painful as if one should live with a foe.

But a living acquaintance with people sagacious
Is happy as if they were cherished relations.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 207 He who walks in the company of fools suffers a long way; company with fools, as with an enemy, is always painful; company with the wise is pleasure, like meeting with kinsfolk.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 207
One who lives together with fools will suffer for a long time.
The company of fools is always painful - like the company of an enemy.
And a wise one is pleasant to live with, like meeting with relatives. [DLMBSFn-V207]
Dhammapada Dhp. 208
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
208. Tasmāhi,
Dhīrañca paññca bahussutañca
Dhorayhasīlaṃ vatavantamāriyaṃ
Taṃ tādisaṃ sappurisaṃ sumedhaṃ
Bhajetha nakkhattapathaṃ'va candimā.

Paṇṇarasamo sukhavaggo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
208. Tasmā hi –
Dhīrañca paññañca bahussutañca, dhorayhasīlaṃ vatavantamariyaṃ;
Taṃ tādisaṃ sappurisaṃ sumedhaṃ, bhajetha nakkhattapathaṃva candimā [tasmā hi dhīraṃ paññañca, bahussutañca dhorayhaṃ; sīlaṃ dhutavatamariyaṃ, taṃ tādisaṃ sappurisaṃ; sumedhaṃ bhajetha nakkhattapathaṃva candimā; (ka.)].

Sukhavaggo pannarasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Therefore:-

With the intelligent, the wise, [NāradaFn15-08] the learned, [NāradaFn15-09] the enduring, [NāradaFn15-10] the dutiful, [NāradaFn15-11] and the Ariya [NāradaFn15-12] - with a man of such virtue and intellect should one associate, as the moon (follows) the starry path.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 208. Therefore, follow the Noble One, who is steadfast, wise, learned, dutiful and devout. One should follow only such a man, who is truly good and discerning, even as the moon follows the path of the stars.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

206-208

It's good to see Noble Ones.
Happy their company — always.
Through not seeing fools
constantly, constantly
  one would be happy.

For, living with a fool,
one grieves a long time.
Painful is communion with fools,
as with an enemy —
  always.
Happy is communion
with the enlightened,
as with a gathering of kin.

  So:
the enlightened man —
discerning, learned,
enduring, dutiful, noble,
intelligent, a man of integrity:
  follow him
  — one of this sort —
  as the moon, the path
  of the zodiac stars.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
208
With men of great learning,
Insightful, discerning,
In wisdom excelling,
Devout, persevering,
The noble and excellent,
Ever associate,
Just as the moon
With the stars of the zodiac.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 208 Therefore, one ought to follow the wise, the intelligent, the learned, the much enduring, the dutiful, the elect; one ought to follow a good and wise man, as the moon follows the path of the stars.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 208
Therefore:
Clever and wise and learned,
virtuous, devout and noble -
associate with such a smart true person,
just like the moon follows the path of the stars. [DLMBSFn-V208]
Dhammapada Dhp. 209
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Piyavaggo.
209. Ayoge yuñjamattānaṃ yogasmiñca ayojayaṃ209
Atthaṃ hitvā piyaggāhī pihetattānuyoginaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

16. Piyavaggo

209. Ayoge yuñjamattānaṃ, yogasmiñca ayojayaṃ;
Atthaṃ hitvā piyaggāhī, pihetattānuyoginaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 16 Affection

AVOID THAT WHICH SHOULD BE SHUNNED

  1. Applying oneself [NāradaFn16-01] to that which should be avoided, not applying oneself to that which should be pursued, [NāradaFn16-02] and giving up the quest, [NāradaFn16-03] one who goes after pleasure envies them who exert themselves. [NāradaFn16-04]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XVI Affection

209. Giving himself to things to be shunned and not exerting where exertion is needed, a seeker after pleasures, having given up his true welfare, envies those intent upon theirs.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XVI Dear Ones

209 [ThaniSFn-V209]

Having applied himself
to what was not his own task,
and not having applied himself
to what was,
having disregarded the goal
to grasp at what he held dear,
he now envies those
who kept after themselves,
     took themselves
         to task.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 16 Affection

209
Having ventured upon what they should have eschewed,
And neglected whatever they should have pursued,
Having spurned their true welfare, held fast by affection,
Such envy the people with self-application.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XVI: Pleasure

209 He who gives himself to vanity, and does not give himself to meditation, forgetting the real aim (of life) and grasping at pleasure, will in time envy him who has exerted himself in meditation.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 16: Affection

DhP 209
Undertaking what is not to be undertaken, not undertaking what is to be undertaken,
having renounced spiritual welfare; one grasping after the pleasant envies one who is pursuing the purification of mind. [DLMBSFn-V209]
Dhammapada Dhp. 210
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
210. Mā piyehi samāgañchī appiyehi kudācanaṃ
Piyānaṃ adassanaṃ dukkhaṃ appiyānañca dassanaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
210. Mā piyehi samāgañchi, appiyehi kudācanaṃ;
Piyānaṃ adassanaṃ dukkhaṃ, appiyānañca dassanaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GIVE UP BOTH WHAT IS DEAR AND NOT DEAR

  1. Consort not with those that are dear, [NāradaFn16-05] never with those that are not dear; not seeing those that are dear and seeing those that are not dear, are both painful. [NāradaFn16-06]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 210. Seek no intimacy with the beloved and also not with the unloved, for not to see the beloved and to see the unloved, both are painful.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

210-211

Don't ever — regardless —
be conjoined with what's dear
  or undear.
It's painful
not to see what's dear
or to see what's not.

So don't make anything dear,
for it's dreadful to be far
from what's dear.
No bonds are found
for those for whom
there's neither dear
nor undear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
210
One shouldn't consort with the ones one adores,
And certainly never with those one abhors.
For painful it is to behold the displeasing,
And painful no longer to see the endearing.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 210 Let no man ever look for what is pleasant, or what is unpleasant. Not to see what is pleasant is pain, and it is pain to see what is unpleasant.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 210
Don't associate with the dear ones, and never with those who are unloved.
Not seeing the dear ones is suffering - and seeing the unloved ones. [DLMBSFn-V210]
Dhammapada Dhp. 211
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
211. Tasmā piyaṃ na kayirātha piyāpāyo hi pāpako
Ganthā tesaṃ na vijjanti yesaṃ natthi piyāppiyaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
211. Tasmā piyaṃ na kayirātha, piyāpāyo hi pāpako;
Ganthā tesaṃ na vijjanti, yesaṃ natthi piyāppiyaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HOLD NOTHING DEAR

  1. Hence hold nothing dear, for separation from those that are dear is bad; bonds do not exist or those to whom naught is dear or not dear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 211. Therefore hold nothing dear, for separation from the dear is painful. There are no bonds for those who have nothing beloved or unloved.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

210-211

Don't ever — regardless —
be conjoined with what's dear
  or undear.
It's painful
not to see what's dear
or to see what's not.

So don't make anything dear,
for it's dreadful to be far
from what's dear.
No bonds are found
for those for whom
there's neither dear
nor undear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
211
Attachment should not be developed:
The parting from loved ones is wretched.
Where nothing's detested and nothing’s beloved,
Attachment cannot, in such case, be discovered.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 211 Let, therefore, no man love anything; loss of the beloved is evil. Those who love nothing and hate nothing, have no fetters.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 211
Therefore, do not hold anything dear; separation from the dear ones is bad.
There are no bonds for those, for whom there is nothing dear or unloved. [DLMBSFn-V211]
Dhammapada Dhp. 212
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
212. Piyato jāyatī soko piyato jāyatī bhayaṃ
Piyato vippamuttassa natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
212. Piyato jāyatī soko, piyato jāyatī [jāyate (ka.)] bhayaṃ;
Piyato vippamuttassa, natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM WHAT IS DEAR

  1. From endearment springs grief, from endearment springs fear; for him who is wholly free from endearment there is no grief, much less fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 212. From endearment springs grief, from endearment springs fear. For one who is wholly free from endearment there is no grief, whence then fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

212-216

From what's dear is born grief,
from what's dear is born fear.
For one freed from what's dear
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From what's loved is born grief,
from what's loved is born fear.
For one freed from what's loved
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From delight is born grief,
from delight is born fear.
For one freed from delight
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From sensuality is born grief,
from sensuality is born fear.
For one freed from sensuality
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From craving is born grief,
from craving is born fear.
For one freed from craving
there's no grief
  — so how fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
212
Fondness leads to lamentation;
Fondness leads to trepidation.
Having reached emancipation,
Grief is not, whence trepidation?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 212 From pleasure comes grief, from pleasure comes fear; he who is free from pleasure knows neither grief nor fear.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 212
From affection, grief is born. From affection, fear is born.
One freed from affection has no grief, whence fear? [DLMBSFn-V212]
Dhammapada Dhp. 213
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
213. Pemato jāyatī soko pemato jāyatī bhayaṃ
Pemato vippamuttassa natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
213. Pemato jāyatī soko, pemato jāyatī bhayaṃ;
Pemato vippamuttassa, natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM AFFECTION

  1. From affection springs grief, from affection springs fear; for him who is wholly free from affection there is no grief, much less fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 213. From affection springs grief, from affection springs fear. For one who is wholly free from affection there is no grief, whence then fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

212-216

From what's dear is born grief,
from what's dear is born fear.
For one freed from what's dear
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From what's loved is born grief,
from what's loved is born fear.
For one freed from what's loved
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From delight is born grief,
from delight is born fear.
For one freed from delight
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From sensuality is born grief,
from sensuality is born fear.
For one freed from sensuality
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From craving is born grief,
from craving is born fear.
For one freed from craving
there's no grief
  — so how fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
213
Love gives rise to lamentation;
Love gives rise to trepidation.
Having reached emancipation,
Grief is not, whence trepidation?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 213 From affection comes grief, from affection comes fear; he who is free from affection knows neither grief nor fear.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 213
From love, grief is born. From love, fear is born.
One freed from love has no grief, whence fear? [DLMBSFn-V213]
Dhammapada Dhp. 214
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
214. Ratiyā jāyatī soko ratiyā jāyatī bhayaṃ
Ratiyā vippamuttassa natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
214. Ratiyā jāyatī soko, ratiyā jāyatī bhayaṃ;
Ratiyā vippamuttassa, natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM ATTACHMENT

  1. From attachment springs grief, from attachment springs fear; for him who is wholly free from attachment there is no grief, much less fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 214. From attachment springs grief, from attachment springs fear. For one who is wholly free from attachment there is no grief, whence then fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

212-216

From what's dear is born grief,
from what's dear is born fear.
For one freed from what's dear
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From what's loved is born grief,
from what's loved is born fear.
For one freed from what's loved
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From delight is born grief,
from delight is born fear.
For one freed from delight
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From sensuality is born grief,
from sensuality is born fear.
For one freed from sensuality
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From craving is born grief,
from craving is born fear.
For one freed from craving
there's no grief
  — so how fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
214
Passion leads to lamentation;
Passion leads to trepidation.
Having reached emancipation,
Grief is not, whence trepidation?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 214 From lust comes grief, from lust comes fear; he who is free from lust knows neither grief nor fear.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 214
From attachment, grief is born. From attachment, fear is born.
One freed from attachment has no grief, whence fear? [DLMBSFn-V214]
Dhammapada Dhp. 215
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
215. Kāmato jāyatī soko kāmato jāyatī bhayaṃ
Kāmato vippamuttassa natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
215. Kāmato jāyatī soko, kāmato jāyatī bhayaṃ;
Kāmato vippamuttassa, natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM LUST

  1. From lust springs grief, from lust springs fear; for him who is wholly free from lust there is no grief, much less fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 215. From lust springs grief, from lust springs fear. For one who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

212-216

From what's dear is born grief,
from what's dear is born fear.
For one freed from what's dear
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From what's loved is born grief,
from what's loved is born fear.
For one freed from what's loved
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From delight is born grief,
from delight is born fear.
For one freed from delight
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From sensuality is born grief,
from sensuality is born fear.
For one freed from sensuality
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From craving is born grief,
from craving is born fear.
For one freed from craving
there's no grief
  — so how fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
215
Sensual lust brings lamentation.
Sensual lust brings trepidation.
Having reached emancipation,
Grief is not, whence trepidation?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 215 From love comes grief, from love comes fear; he who is free from love knows neither grief nor fear.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 215
From pleasure, grief is born. From pleasure, fear is born.
One freed from pleasure has no grief, whence fear? [DLMBSFn-V215]
Dhammapada Dhp. 216
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
216. Taṇhāya jāyatī soko taṇhāya jāyatī bhayaṃ
Taṇhāya vippamuttassa natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
216. Taṇhāya jāyatī [jāyate (ka.)] soko, taṇhāya jāyatī bhayaṃ;
Taṇhāya vippamuttassa, natthi soko kuto bhayaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM CRAVING

  1. From craving springs grief, from craving springs fear; for him who is wholly free from craving there is no grief, much less fear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 216. From craving springs grief, from craving springs fear. For one who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

212-216

From what's dear is born grief,
from what's dear is born fear.
For one freed from what's dear
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From what's loved is born grief,
from what's loved is born fear.
For one freed from what's loved
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From delight is born grief,
from delight is born fear.
For one freed from delight
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From sensuality is born grief,
from sensuality is born fear.
For one freed from sensuality
there's no grief
  — so how fear?

From craving is born grief,
from craving is born fear.
For one freed from craving
there's no grief
  — so how fear?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
216
Craving kindles lamentation.
Craving kindles trepidation.
Having found emancipation,
Grief is not, whence trepidation?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 216 From greed comes grief, from greed comes fear; he who is free from greed knows neither grief nor fear.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 216
From thirst, grief is born. From thirst, fear is born.
One freed from thirst has no grief, whence fear? [DLMBSFn-V216]
Dhammapada Dhp. 217
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
217. Sīladassanasampannaṃ dhammaṭṭhaṃ saccavedinaṃ
Attano kamma kubbānaṃ taṃ jano kurute piyaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
217. Sīladassanasampannaṃ , dhammaṭṭhaṃ saccavedinaṃ;
Attano kamma kubbānaṃ, taṃ jano kurute piyaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE VIRTUOUS ARE DEAR TO ALL

  1. Whoso is perfect in virtue, [NāradaFn16-07] and insight, [NāradaFn16-08] is established in the Dhamma, [NāradaFn16-09] has realized the Truths, [NāradaFn16-10] and fulfils his own duties [NāradaFn16-11] - him do folk hold dear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 217. People hold dear him who embodies virtue and insight, who is principled, has realized the truth, and who himself does what he ought to be doing.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

217

One consummate in virtue & vision,
judicious,
speaking the truth,
doing his own task:
  the world holds him dear.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

217

The religious
          who are accomplished in virtue and insight;
          who are well-established in Dhamma;
          who know Truth;
          who have done what needed to be done for themselves:
laypeople adore them.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 217 He who possesses virtue and intelligence, who is just, speaks the truth, and does what is his own business, him the world will hold dear.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 217
People hold dear the one, who is endowed with virtue and seeing,
righteous, knowing the truth and is doing what should be done. [DLMBSFn-V217]
Dhammapada Dhp. 218
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
218. Chandajāto anakkhāte manasā ca phuṭo siyā
Kāmesu ca appaṭibaddhacitto uddhaṃ soto'ti vuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
218. Chandajāto anakkhāte, manasā ca phuṭo siyā;
Kāmesu ca appaṭibaddhacitto [appaṭibandhacitto (ka.)], uddhaṃsototi vuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE NON-ATTACHED GO UPSTREAM

  1. He who has developed a wish for the Undeclared [NāradaFn16-12] (Nibbāna), he whose mind is thrilled (with the three Fruits [NāradaFn16-13] ), he whose mind is not bound by material pleasures, such a person is called an "Upstream-bound One". [NāradaFn16-14]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 218. One who is intent upon the Ineffable (Nibbana), dwells with mind inspired (by supramundane wisdom), and is no more bound by sense pleasures — such a man is called "One Bound Upstream." [BudRkFn-v218]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

218 [ThaniSFn-V218]

  If
you've given birth to a wish
  for what can't be expressed,
are suffused with heart,
your mind not enmeshed
in sensual passions:
  you're said to be
  in the up-flowing stream.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
218
Whoever have a longing to discover the ineffable,
Should bring about the flowering of their minds,
And liberate their hearts from every passion that is sensual:
As “people going upstream” are they styled.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 218 He in whom a desire for the Ineffable (Nirvana) has sprung up, who is satisfied in his mind, and whose thoughts are not bewildered by love, he is called urdhvamsrotas (carried upwards by the stream).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 218
People hold dear the one, who is endowed with virtue and seeing,
righteous, knowing the truth and is doing what should be done. [DLMBSFn-V218]
Dhammapada Dhp. 219
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
219. Cirappavāsiṃ purisaṃ dūrato sotthimāgataṃ
Ñātimittā suhajjā ca abhinandanti āgataṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
219. Cirappavāsiṃ purisaṃ, dūrato sotthimāgataṃ;
Ñātimittā suhajjā ca, abhinandanti āgataṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

MERIT WELCOMES THE DOERS OF GOOD

  1. A man long absent and returned safe from afar, his kinsmen, friends, and well-wishers welcome on his arrival.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 219. When, after a long absence, a man safely returns from afar, his relatives, friends and well-wishers welcome him home on arrival.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

219-220 [ThaniSFn-V219]

A man long absent
comes home safe from afar.
His kin, his friends, his companions,
delight in his return.

In just the same way,
when you've done good
& gone from this world
  to the world beyond,
your good deeds receive you —
as kin, someone dear
  come home.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
219 & 220

A man might for years from his family depart,
And then safely return from those faraway parts;
And his friends and relations, and those that are dear,
Would be dancing for joy when they see him appear.

In the very same way, for a man of good deeds,
Who from life in this world to the next one proceeds,
With the warmest of welcomes his merit will greet him.
He’ll go like a son with a family to meet him.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 219 Kinsmen, friends, and lovers salute a man who has been long away, and returns safe from afar.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 219
Relatives, companions and friends are happy about coming back of
a person, long away from home, safely come back from far away, [DLMBSFn-V219]
Dhammapada Dhp. 220
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
220. Tatheva katapuññampi asmā lokā paraṃ gataṃ
Puññāni patigaṇhanti piyaṃ ñātīva āgataṃ.

Soḷasamo piyavaggo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
220. Tatheva katapuññampi, asmā lokā paraṃ gataṃ;
Puññāni paṭigaṇhanti, piyaṃ ñātīva āgataṃ.

Piyavaggo soḷasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Likewise, his good deeds will receive the well-doer who has gone from this world to the next, as kinsmen will receive a dear one on his return.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 220. As kinsmen welcome a dear one on arrival, even so his own good deeds will welcome the doer of good who has gone from this world to the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

219-220

A man long absent
comes home safe from afar.
His kin, his friends, his companions,
delight in his return.

In just the same way,
when you've done good
& gone from this world
  to the world beyond,
your good deeds receive you —
as kin, someone dear
  come home.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
219 & 220

A man might for years from his family depart,
And then safely return from those faraway parts;
And his friends and relations, and those that are dear,
Would be dancing for joy when they see him appear.

In the very same way, for a man of good deeds,
Who from life in this world to the next one proceeds,
With the warmest of welcomes his merit will greet him.
He’ll go like a son with a family to meet him.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 220 In like manner his good works receive him who has done good, and has gone from this world to the other;--as kinsmen receive a friend on his return.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 220
Thus, the good deeds receive the well-doer, gone from this world to the other one,
just like relatives receive a beloved one, who has come back. [DLMBSFn-V220]
Dhammapada Dhp. 221
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Kodhavaggo.
221. Kodhaṃ jahe vippajaheyya mānaṃ
[jtb 2010.08.22: text missing here ]
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

17. Kodhavaggo

221. Kodhaṃ jahe vippajaheyya mānaṃ, saṃyojanaṃ sabbamatikkameyya;
Taṃ nāmarūpasmimasajjamānaṃ, akiñcanaṃ nānupatanti dukkhā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 17 Anger

GIVE UP ANGER

  1. One should give up anger. One should abandon pride. One should overcome all fetters. Ills never befall him who clings not to mind and body and is passionless.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XVII Anger

221. One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters. Suffering never befalls him who clings not to mind and body and is detached.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XVII Anger

221

Abandon anger,
be done with conceit,
get beyond every fetter.
When for name & form
you have no attachment
 — have nothing at all —
no sufferings, no stresses, invade.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 17 Wrath

221
Abandon anger; utterly renounce conceit; transcend the fetters. Sorrow does not fall on those who do not cling to mind and body, and who are free of attachment. [VaradoFn-V221]
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XVII: Anger

221 Let a man leave anger, let him forsake pride, let him overcome all bondage! No sufferings befall the man who is not attached to name and form, and who calls nothing his own.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 17: Anger

DhP 221
Renounce anger; abandon pride.
Overcome all fetters.
The one, who is not attached to mind and body,
and has nothing, is not followed by suffering. [DLMBSFn-V221]
Dhammapada Dhp. 222
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
222. [jtb 2010.08.22: text missing here ]
Tamahaṃ sārathiṃ brūmi rasmggāho itaro jano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
222. Yo ve uppatitaṃ kodhaṃ, rathaṃ bhantaṃva vāraye [dhāraye (sī. syā. pī.)];
Tamahaṃ sārathiṃ brūmi, rasmiggāho itaro jano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

CONTROL YOUR ANGER

  1. Whoso checks his uprisen anger as though it were a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Other charioteers are mere rein-holders.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 222. He who checks rising anger as a charioteer checks a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Others only hold the reins.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

222

When anger arises,
whoever keeps firm control
as if with a racing chariot:
him
I call a master charioteer.
  Anyone else,
  a rein-holder —
  that's all.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
222
Whoever arrests the arising of wrath,
Like a chariot skidding one brings to a halt,
Could a ‘charioteer’ be deservedly named.
The remainder of men are but ‘holders of reins’.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 222 He who holds back rising anger like a rolling chariot, him I call a real driver; other people are but holding the reins.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 222
Who would restrain rising anger, like a swaying chariot,
him I call a charioteer. Other people just hold the reins. [DLMBSFn-V222]
Dhammapada Dhp. 223
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
223. Akkodhena jine kodhaṃ asādhuṃ sādhunā jine
Jine kadariyaṃ dānena saccena alikavādinaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
223. Akkodhena jine kodhaṃ, asādhuṃ sādhunā jine;
Jine kadariyaṃ dānena, saccenālikavādinaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

OVERCOME ANGER BY LOVE

  1. Conquer anger by love. Conquer evil by good. Conquer the stingy by giving. Conquer the liar by truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 223. Overcome the angry by non-anger; overcome the wicked by goodness; overcome the miser by generosity; overcome the liar by truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

223

Conquer anger
  with lack of anger;
bad, with good;
stinginess, with a gift;
a liar, with truth.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
223
By giving, tame the niggardly;
The wicked, by propriety;
The surly, by placidity;
The crooked, by integrity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 223 Let a man overcome anger by love, let him overcome evil by good; let him overcome the greedy by liberality, the liar by truth!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 223
Conquer anger by non-anger; conquer badness by goodness.
Conquer stinginess by giving; conquer liar by truth. [DLMBSFn-V223]
Dhammapada Dhp. 224
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
224. Saccaṃ bhaṇe na kujjheyya dajjāppasmimpi yācito
Etehi tīhi ṭhānehi gacche devāna santike.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
224. Saccaṃ bhaṇe na kujjheyya, dajjā appampi [dajjā’ppasmimpi (sī. pī.), dajjā appasmi (syā. ka.)] yācito;
Etehi tīhi ṭhānehi, gacche devāna santike.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE TRUTHFUL, PATIENT AND GENEROUS

  1. One should utter the truth. One should not be angry. One should give even from a scanty store to him who asks. Along these three paths one may go to the presence of the gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 224. Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

224

By telling the truth;
by not growing angry;
by giving, when asked,
no matter how little you have:
by these three things
you enter the presence of devas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
224
Speak what’s truthful;
Don’t be wrathful;
Give if asked,
At least a little.

Due to these
Conditions three,
You’ll reach the realm
Of deities.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 224 Speak the truth, do not yield to anger; give, if thou art asked for little; by these three steps thou wilt go near the gods.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 224
Speak truth; don't get angry; when asked, give, even a little.
By these three means one will go to the presence of gods. [DLMBSFn-V224]
Dhammapada Dhp. 225
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
225. Ahiṃsakā ye munayo niccaṃ kāyenasaṃvutā
Te yanti accutaṃ ṭhānaṃ yattha gantvā na socare.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
225. Ahiṃsakā ye munayo [ahiṃsakāyā munayo (ka.)], niccaṃ kāyena saṃvutā;
Te yanti accutaṃ ṭhānaṃ, yattha gantvā na socare.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE HARMLESS ATTAIN THE DEATHLESS

  1. Those sages who are harmless, and are ever restrained in body, [NāradaFn17-01] go to the deathless state (Nibbāna), whither gone they never grieve.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 225. Those sages who are inoffensive and ever restrained in body, go to the Deathless State, where, having gone, they grieve no more.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

225

Gentle sages,
constantly restrained in body,
go to the unwavering state
where, having gone,
there's no grief.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
225
The sage who from violence abstains;
Who, in body, is ever restrained;
From the state that is mortal he’ll leave.
Having left it, he’ll never more grieve.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 225 The sages who injure nobody, and who always control their body, they will go to the unchangeable place (Nirvana), where, if they have gone, they will suffer no more.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 225
The wise ones, who are not hurting, always guarding their behavior,
they will go to the Permanent Place (Nirvana), where one does not grieve. [DLMBSFn-V225]
Dhammapada Dhp. 226
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
226. Sadā jāgaramānānaṃ ahorattānusikkhinaṃ
Nibbāṇaṃ adhimuttānaṃ atthaṃ gacchanti āsavā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
226. Sadā jāgaramānānaṃ, ahorattānusikkhinaṃ;
Nibbānaṃ adhimuttānaṃ, atthaṃ gacchanti āsavā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE EVER VIGILANT GIVE UP DEFILEMENTS

  1. The defilements [NāradaFn17-02] of those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, who are wholly intent on Nibbāna, are destroyed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 226. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, and are ever intent upon Nibbana — their defilements fade away.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

226

Those who always stay wakeful,
training by day & by night,
keen on Unbinding:
their effluents come to an end.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
226
In those who are ceaselessly wakeful,
Who practise by night and by day,
Who’ve committed themselves to Nibbana,
Their asavas dwindle away.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 226 Those who are ever watchful, who study day and night, and who strive after Nirvana, their passions will come to an end.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 226
Those, who are always watchful, studying all day and night,
intent upon reaching the Nirvana - their taints disappear. [DLMBSFn-V226]
Dhammapada Dhp. 227
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
227. Porāṇametaṃ atula netaṃ ajjatanāmiva
Nindanti tuṇhimāsīnaṃ nindanti bahubhāṇinaṃ
Mitabhāṇimpi nindanti natthi loke anindito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
227. Porāṇametaṃ atula, netaṃ ajjatanāmiva;
Nindanti tuṇhimāsīnaṃ, nindanti bahubhāṇinaṃ;
Mitabhāṇimpi nindanti, natthi loke anindito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THERE IS NONE WHO IS BLAMELESS IN THIS WORLD

  1. This, O Atula, [NāradaFn17-03] is an old saying; it is not one of today only: they blame those who sit silent, they blame those who speak too much. Those speaking little too they blame. There is no one who is not blamed in this world.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 227. O Atula! Indeed, this is an ancient practice, not one only of today: they blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

227-228

This has come down from old, Atula,
& not just from today:
they find fault with one
  who sits silent,
they find fault with one
  who speaks a great deal,
they find fault with one
  who measures his words.
There's no one unfaulted in the world.
There never was,
  will be,
nor at present is found
anyone entirely faulted
or entirely praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
227
This, Atula’s, true of yore,
Not merely true today:
They blame those sitting silently,
And those with much to say;
Blame, too, the one of moderate words.
There’s no one free from blame on earth.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 227 This is an old saying, O Atula, this is not only of to-day: 'They blame him who sits silent, they blame him who speaks much, they also blame him who says little; there is no one on earth who is not blamed.'
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 227
O Atula, this is an old thing; it is not just today.
They blame one who is sitting silently; they blame one who is speaking a lot.
They blame also the one who is speaking moderately. There is nobody blameless in the world. [DLMBSFn-V227]
Dhammapada Dhp. 228
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
228. Na cāhu na ca bhavissati na cetarahi vijjati
Ekantaṃ nindito poso ekantaṃ vā pasaṃsito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
228. Na cāhu na ca bhavissati, na cetarahi vijjati;
Ekantaṃ nindito poso, ekantaṃ vā pasaṃsito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THERE IS NONE WHO IS WHOLLY BLAMED OR PRAISED

  1. There never was, there never will be, nor does there exist now, a person who is wholly blamed or wholly praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 228. There never was, there never will be, nor is there now, a person who is wholly blamed or wholly praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

227-228

This has come down from old, Atula,
& not just from today:
they find fault with one
  who sits silent,
they find fault with one
  who speaks a great deal,
they find fault with one
  who measures his words.
There's no one unfaulted in the world.
There never was,
  will be,
nor at present is found
anyone entirely faulted
or entirely praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
228
There never was, there isn’t now,
Nor will there be in future found,
A person given only blame,
Nor one who always gets acclaim.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 228 There never was, there never will be, nor is there now, a man who is always blamed, or a man who is always praised.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 228
There never was, never will be and even now does not exist
a person who is only blamed or only praised. [DLMBSFn-V228]
Dhammapada Dhp. 229
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
229. Yañce viññū pasaṃsanti anuvicca suve suve
Acchiddavuttiṃ medhāviṃ paññāsīlasamāhitaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
229. Yaṃ ce viññū pasaṃsanti, anuvicca suve suve;
Acchiddavuttiṃ [acchinnavuttiṃ (ka.)] medhāviṃ, paññāsīlasamāhitaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE BLAMELESS ARE PRAISED

  1. Examining day by day, the wise praise him who is of flawless life, intelligent, endowed with knowledge and virtue.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 229. But the man whom the wise praise, after observing him day after day, is one of flawless character, wise, and endowed with knowledge and virtue.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

229-230

If knowledgeable people praise him,
having observed him
  day after day
to be blameless in conduct, intelligent,
endowed with discernment & virtue:
like an ingot of gold —
who's fit to find fault with him?
  Even devas praise him.
  Even by Brahmas he's praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
229 & 230

If, having watched someone day after day, intelligent people praise him, a sage, one of flawless conduct, possessed of virtue and wisdom, then who is justified to criticise him? The devas praise him; Brahma praises him; he is an ornament of purest gold.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 229, 230. But he whom those who discriminate praise continually day after day, as without blemish, wise, rich in knowledge and virtue, who would dare to blame him, like a coin made of gold from the Gambu river? Even the gods praise him, he is praised even by Brahman.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 229
Whom the wise ones praise, having examined him thoroughly day after day,
one with faultless conduct, intelligent, endowed with wisdom and virtue,
[continued in DhP 230] [DLMBSFn-V229]
Dhammapada Dhp. 230
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
230. Nekkhaṃ jambonadasseva ko taṃ ninditumarahati
Devā'pi naṃ pasaṃsanti brahmunā'pi pasaṃsito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
230. Nikkhaṃ [nekkhaṃ (sī. syā. pī.)] jambonadasseva, ko taṃ ninditumarahati;
Devāpi naṃ pasaṃsanti, brahmunāpi pasaṃsito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

WHO DARE BLAME THE PURE?

  1. Who deigns to blame him who is like a piece of refined gold? Even the gods praise him; by Brahma too he is praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 230. Who can blame such a one, as worthy as a coin of refined gold? Even the gods praise him; by Brahma, too, is he praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

229-230

If knowledgeable people praise him,
having observed him
  day after day
to be blameless in conduct, intelligent,
endowed with discernment & virtue:
like an ingot of gold —
who's fit to find fault with him?
  Even devas praise him.
  Even by Brahmas he's praised.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
229 & 230

If, having watched someone day after day, intelligent people praise him, a sage, one of flawless conduct, possessed of virtue and wisdom, then who is justified to criticise him? The devas praise him; Brahma praises him; he is an ornament of purest gold.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 229, 230. But he whom those who discriminate praise continually day after day, as without blemish, wise, rich in knowledge and virtue, who would dare to blame him, like a coin made of gold from the Gambu river? Even the gods praise him, he is praised even by Brahman.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 230
[continued from DhP 229]
Who is worthy enough to blame him, like a ring made of gold?
Even gods praise him; he is praised also by Brahma. [DLMBSFn-V230]
Dhammapada Dhp. 231
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
231. Kāyappakopaṃ rakkheyya kāyena saṃvuto siyā
Kāyaduccaritaṃ hitvā kāyena sucaritaṃ care.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
231. Kāyappakopaṃ rakkheyya, kāyena saṃvuto siyā;
Kāyaduccaritaṃ hitvā, kāyena sucaritaṃ care.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE PURE IN DEED, WORD AND THOUGHT

  1. One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) the body, and one should be restrained in body. Giving up evil conduct in body, one should be of good bodily conduct.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 231. Let a man guard himself against irritability in bodily action; let him be controlled in deed. Abandoning bodily misconduct, let him practice good conduct in deed.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

231-234 [ThaniSFn-V231-233]

Guard against anger
erupting in body;
in body, be restrained.
Having abandoned bodily misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in body.

Guard against anger
erupting in speech;
in speech, be restrained.
Having abandoned verbal misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in speech.

Guard against anger
erupting in mind;
in mind, be restrained.
Having abandoned mental misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in mind.

Those restrained in body
  — the enlightened —
restrained in speech & in mind
  — enlightened —
are the ones whose restraint is secure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
231
Restrain unruly conduct;
In body be subdued;
Abandon wrong behaviour,
And righteous deeds pursue.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 231 Beware of bodily anger, and control thy body! Leave the sins of the body, and with thy body practise virtue!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 231
Protect yourself from blameworthy conduct; guard your body well.
Having renounced the wrong bodily deed, practice the right bodily action. [DLMBSFn-V231]
Dhammapada Dhp. 232
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
232. Vacīpakopaṃ rakkheyya vācāya saṃvuto siyā
Vacīduccaritaṃ hitvā vācāya sucaritaṃ care.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
232. Vacīpakopaṃ rakkheyya, vācāya saṃvuto siyā;
Vacīduccaritaṃ hitvā, vācāya sucaritaṃ care.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) speech, and one should be restrained in speech. Giving up evil conduct in speech, one should be of good conduct in speech.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 232. Let a man guard himself against irritability in speech; let him be controlled in speech. Abandoning verbal misconduct, let him practice good conduct in speech.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

231-234 [ThaniSFn-V231-233]

Guard against anger
erupting in body;
in body, be restrained.
Having abandoned bodily misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in body.

Guard against anger
erupting in speech;
in speech, be restrained.
Having abandoned verbal misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in speech.

Guard against anger
erupting in mind;
in mind, be restrained.
Having abandoned mental misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in mind.

Those restrained in body
  — the enlightened —
restrained in speech & in mind
  — enlightened —
are the ones whose restraint is secure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
232
Restrain unruly discourse;
In speaking be subdued;
Abandon speech misconduct,
And righteous speech pursue.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 232 Beware of the anger of the tongue, and control thy tongue! Leave the sins of the tongue, and practise virtue with thy tongue!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 232
Protect yourself from blameworthy speech; guard your speech well.
Having renounced the wrong verbal deed, practice the right verbal action. [DLMBSFn-V232]
Dhammapada Dhp. 233
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
233. Manopakopaṃ rakkheyya manasā saṃvuto siyā
Manoduccaritaṃ hitvā manasā sucaritaṃ care.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
233. Manopakopaṃ rakkheyya, manasā saṃvuto siyā;
Manoduccaritaṃ hitvā, manasā sucaritaṃ care.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) the mind, and one should be restrained in mind. Giving up evil conduct in mind, one should be of good conduct in mind.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 233. Let a man guard himself against irritability in thought; let him be controlled in mind. Abandoning mental misconduct, let him practice good conduct in thought.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

231-234 [ThaniSFn-V231-233]

Guard against anger
erupting in body;
in body, be restrained.
Having abandoned bodily misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in body.

Guard against anger
erupting in speech;
in speech, be restrained.
Having abandoned verbal misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in speech.

Guard against anger
erupting in mind;
in mind, be restrained.
Having abandoned mental misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in mind.

Those restrained in body
  — the enlightened —
restrained in speech & in mind
  — enlightened —
are the ones whose restraint is secure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
233
Restrain unruly thinking;
In thinking be subdued;
Abandon thought misconduct,
And righteous thoughts pursue.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 233 Beware of the anger of the mind, and control thy mind! Leave the sins of the mind, and practise virtue with thy mind!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 233
Protect yourself from blameworthy thoughts; guard your mind well.
Having renounced the wrong mental deed, practice the right mental action. [DLMBSFn-V233]
Dhammapada Dhp. 234
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
234. Kāyena saṃvutā dhīrā atho vācāya saṃvutā
Manasā saṃvutā dhīrā te ve suparisaṃvutā.

Sattarasamo kodhavaggo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
234. Kāyena saṃvutā dhīrā, atho vācāya saṃvutā;
Manasā saṃvutā dhīrā, te ve suparisaṃvutā.

Kodhavaggo sattarasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. The wise are restrained in deed; in speech, too, they are restrained. The wise, restrained in mind, are indeed those who are perfectly restrained.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 234. The wise are controlled in bodily action, controlled in speech and controlled in thought. They are truly well-controlled.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

231-234

Guard against anger
erupting in body;
in body, be restrained.
Having abandoned bodily misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in body.

Guard against anger
erupting in speech;
in speech, be restrained.
Having abandoned verbal misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in speech.

Guard against anger
erupting in mind;
in mind, be restrained.
Having abandoned mental misconduct,
live conducting yourself well
  in mind.

Those restrained in body
  — the enlightened —
restrained in speech & in mind
  — enlightened —
are the ones whose restraint is secure.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
234
The one of comprehension,
Restrained in thought and speech,
Restrained in body conduct,
Is well-restrained, indeed.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 234 The wise who control their body, who control their tongue, the wise who control their mind, are indeed well controlled.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 234
The wise ones, who are restrained in bodily conduct, in speech,
and in mind, they are indeed well and thoroughly restrained. [DLMBSFn-V234]
Dhammapada Dhp. 235
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Malavaggo.
235. Paṇḍupalāso'va dāni'si yamapurisā'pi ca taṃ upaṭṭhitā
Uyyogamukhe ca tiṭṭhasi patheyyampi ca te na vijjati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

18. Malavaggo

235. Paṇḍupalāsova dānisi, yamapurisāpi ca te [taṃ (sī. syā. kaṃ. pī.)] upaṭṭhitā;
Uyyogamukhe ca tiṭṭhasi, pātheyyampi ca te na vijjati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 18 Impurities Or Taints

DEATH IS NEAR TO YOU

  1. Like a withered leaf are you now. The messengers of death wait on you. On the threshold of decay you stand. Provision too there is none for you.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XVIII Impurity

235. Like a withered leaf are you now; death's messengers await you. You stand on the eve of your departure, yet you have made no provision for your journey!

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XVIII Impurities

235-238 [ThaniSFn-V235]

  You are now
like a yellowed leaf.
  Already
Yama's minions stand near.
You stand at the door to departure
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you'll reach the divine realm
of the noble ones.

  You are now
right at the end of your time.
  You are headed
to Yama's presence,
with no place to rest along the way,
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you won't again undergo birth
         & aging.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 18 Stains

235 & 236

A shrivelled leaf you now resemble;
Yama’s men nearby assemble.
Here at death you stand, however,
You’ve provisions none whatever.

So: for yourself, an island make.
By nimble effort, be a sage.
When cleansed of taints and free of stain,
The Pure Abodes will you attain.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XVIII: Impurity

235 Thou art now like a sear leaf, the messengers of death (Yama) have come near to thee; thou standest at the door of thy departure, and thou hast no provision for thy journey.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 18: Taint

DhP 235
You are like a withered leaf. Yama's men are ready for you.
You are standing in the mouth of death. And you have nothing to take with you. [DLMBSFn-V235]
Dhammapada Dhp. 236
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
236. So karohi dīpamattano khippa vāyama paṇḍito bhava
Niddhantamalo anaṅgaṇo dibbaṃ ariyabhūmimehisi.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
236. So karohi dīpamattano, khippaṃ vāyama paṇḍito bhava;
Niddhantamalo anaṅgaṇo, dibbaṃ ariyabhūmiṃ upehisi [dibbaṃ ariyabhūmimehisi (sī. syā. pī.), dibbamariyabhūmiṃ upehisi (?)].
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

STRIVE HARD

  1. Make an island unto yourself. Strive quickly; become wise. Purged of stain and passionless, you shall enter the heavenly stage of the Ariyas. [NāradaFn18-01]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 236. Make an island for yourself! Strive hard and become wise! Rid of impurities and cleansed of stain, you shall enter the celestial abode of the Noble Ones.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

235-238 [ThaniSFn-V236]

  You are now
like a yellowed leaf.
  Already
Yama's minions stand near.
You stand at the door to departure
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you'll reach the divine realm
of the noble ones.

  You are now
right at the end of your time.
  You are headed
to Yama's presence,
with no place to rest along the way,
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you won't again undergo birth
         & aging.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
235 & 236

A shrivelled leaf you now resemble;
Yama’s men nearby assemble.
Here at death you stand, however,
You’ve provisions none whatever.

So: for yourself, an island make.
By nimble effort, be a sage.
When cleansed of taints and free of stain,
The Pure Abodes will you attain.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 236 Make thyself an island, work hard, be wise! When thy impurities are blown away, and thou art free from guilt, thou wilt enter into the heavenly world of the elect (Ariya).
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 236
Be an island unto yourself! Strive quickly; be wise!
Without impurities and clear, you will approach the heavenly place of the Noble Ones. [DLMBSFn-V236]
Dhammapada Dhp. 237
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
237. Upanītavayo ca dāni'si sampayāto'si yamassa santike
Vāso'pi cate tthi antarā pātheyyampi ca te na vijjati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
237. Upanītavayo ca dānisi, sampayātosi yamassa santike;
Vāso [vāsopi ca (bahūsu)] te natthi antarā, pātheyyampi ca te na vijjati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

LIFE COMES TO AN END

  1. Your life has come to an end now. To the presence of death you are setting out. No halting place is there for you by the way. Provision too there is none for you.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 237. Your life has come to an end now; You are setting forth into the presence of Yama, the king of death. No resting place is there for you on the way, yet you have made no provision for the journey!
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

235-238

  You are now
like a yellowed leaf.
  Already
Yama's minions stand near.
You stand at the door to departure
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you'll reach the divine realm
of the noble ones.

  You are now
right at the end of your time.
  You are headed
to Yama's presence,
with no place to rest along the way,
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you won't again undergo birth
         & aging.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
237 & 238

The close of life you now have reached;
You’ll now to Yama’s court proceed.
No half-way house lies on your way;
Provisions, you have not arranged.

So: for yourself, an island make.
By nimble effort, be a sage.
When cleansed of taints and free of stain,
You’ll not face birth and age again.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 237 Thy life has come to an end, thou art come near to death (Yama), there is no resting-place for thee on the road, and thou hast no provision for thy journey.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 237
You have come to the end of your life now. You are getting close to the presence of Yama.
On the way there, there is no resting place for you. And you have nothing to take with you. [DLMBSFn-V237]
Dhammapada Dhp. 238
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
238. So karohi dīpamattano khippa vāyama paṇḍito bhava
Niddhantamalo anaṅgaṇo na puna jātijaraṃ upehisi.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
238. So karohi dīpamattano, khippaṃ vāyama paṇḍito bhava;
Niddhantamalo anaṅgaṇo, na punaṃ jātijaraṃ [na puna jātijaraṃ (sī. syā.), na puna jātijjaraṃ (ka.)] upehisi.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

BE PASSIONLESS

  1. Make an island unto yourself. Strive without delay; become wise. Purged of stain and passionless, you will not come again to birth and old age.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 238. Make an island unto yourself! Strive hard and become wise! Rid of impurities and cleansed of stain, you shall not come again to birth and decay.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

235-238

  You are now
like a yellowed leaf.
  Already
Yama's minions stand near.
You stand at the door to departure
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you'll reach the divine realm
of the noble ones.

  You are now
right at the end of your time.
  You are headed
to Yama's presence,
with no place to rest along the way,
but have yet to provide
for the journey.

Make an island for yourself!
Work quickly! Be wise!
With impurities all blown away,
  unblemished,
you won't again undergo birth
         & aging.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
237 & 238

The close of life you now have reached;
You’ll now to Yama’s court proceed.
No half-way house lies on your way;
Provisions, you have not arranged.

So: for yourself, an island make.
By nimble effort, be a sage.
When cleansed of taints and free of stain,
You’ll not face birth and age again.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 238 Make thyself an island, work hard, be wise! When thy impurities are blown away, and thou art free from guilt, thou wilt not enter again into birth and decay.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 238
Be an island unto yourself! Strive quickly; be wise!
Without impurities and clear, you will never again come to birth and aging. [DLMBSFn-V238]
Dhammapada Dhp. 239
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
239. Anupubbena medhāvī thokathokaṃ khaṇe khaṇe
Kammāro rajatasseva niddhame malamattano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
239. Anupubbena medhāvī, thokaṃ thokaṃ khaṇe khaṇe;
Kammāro rajatasseva, niddhame malamattano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

PURIFY YOURSELF GRADUALLY

  1. By degrees, little by little, from time to time, a wise person should remove his own impurities, as a smith removes (the dross) of silver.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 239. One by one, little by little, moment by moment, a wise man should remove his own impurities, as a smith removes his dross from silver.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

239

Just as a silver smith
step by
step,
  bit by
  bit,
     moment to
     moment,
blows away the impurities
of molten silver —
so the wise man, his own.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
239
Little by little, and step by step,
In steady succession, the sage ejects
Stains of mind, which, just like dross,
From molten silver, smiths drain off.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 239 Let a wise man blow off the impurities of his self, as a smith blows off the impurities of silver one by one, little by little, and from time to time.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 239
A wise one should cleanse oneself of impurities, gradually,
little by little, moment by moment - just like a smith does with silver. [DLMBSFn-V239]
Dhammapada Dhp. 240
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
240. Ayasā'va malaṃ samuṭṭhitaṃ taduṭṭhāya tameva khādati
Evaṃ atidhonacārinaṃ sakakammāni nayanti duggatiṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
240. Ayasāva malaṃ samuṭṭhitaṃ [samuṭṭhāya (ka.)], tatuṭṭhāya [taduṭṭhāya (sī. syā. pī.)] tameva khādati;
Evaṃ atidhonacārinaṃ, sāni kammāni [sakakammāni (sī. pī.)] nayanti duggatiṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE'S EVIL RUINS ONESELF

  1. As rust sprung from iron eats itself away when arisen, even so his own deeds lead the transgressor [NāradaFn18-02] to states of woe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 240. Just as rust arising from iron eats away the base from which it arises, even so, their own deeds lead transgressors to states of woe.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

240 [ThaniSFn-V240]

Just as rust
 — iron's impurity —
eats the very iron
from which it is born,
  so the deeds
of one who lives slovenly
  lead him on
to a bad destination.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
240
Just as rust from iron that grows,
That very iron the rust corrodes;
So, deeds of them who live indulgently, [VaradoFn-V240]
Lead them on to states of misery.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 240 As the impurity which springs from the iron, when it springs from it, destroys it; thus do a transgressor's own works lead him to the evil path.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 240
Just like rust eats the very iron from which it has arisen,
so the one who is indulging too much in the use of four requisites of a monk is led to a miserable existence by his own deeds. [DLMBSFn-V240]
Dhammapada Dhp. 241
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
241. Asajjhāyamalā mantā anuṭṭhānamalā gharā
Malaṃ vaṇṇassa kosajjaṃ pamādo rakkhato malaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
241. Asajjhāyamalā mantā, anuṭṭhānamalā gharā;
Malaṃ vaṇṇassa kosajjaṃ, pamādo rakkhato malaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

CAUSES OF STAIN

  1. Non-recitation is the rust of incantations; [NāradaFn18-03] non-exertion is the rust of homes; [NāradaFn18-04] sloth is the taint of beauty; carelessness is the flaw of a watcher.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 241. Non-repetition is the bane of scriptures; neglect is the bane of a home; slovenliness is the bane of personal appearance, and heedlessness is the bane of a guard.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

241-243

No recitation: the ruinous impurity
         of chants.
No initiative: of a household.
Indolence: of beauty.
Heedlessness: of a guard.

In a woman, misconduct is an impurity.
In a donor, stinginess.
Evil deeds are the real impurities
in this world & the next.

More impure than these impurities
is the ultimate impurity:
  ignorance.
Having abandoned this impurity,
monks, you're impurity-free.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
241
Non-study’s the stain of the scriptures;
Supineness, the stain of a house;
The stain of a guard is remissness;
The stain of the comely is sloth.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 241 The taint of prayers is non-repetition; the taint of houses, non- repair; the taint of the body is sloth; the taint of a watchman, thoughtlessness.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 241
Non-studying is the stain of sacred texts. Neglect is the stain of houses.
The stain of beauty is idleness. The stain of a guard is negligence. [DLMBSFn-V241]
Dhammapada Dhp. 242
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
242. Malitthiyā duccaritaṃ maccheraṃ dadato malaṃ
Malā ve pāpakā dhammā asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
242. Malitthiyā duccaritaṃ, maccheraṃ dadato malaṃ;
Malā ve pāpakā dhammā, asmiṃ loke paramhi ca.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

TAINTS ARE EVIL THINGS IGNORANCE IS THE GREATEST TAINT

  1. Misconduct is the taint of a woman. Stinginess is the taint of a donor. Taints, indeed, are all evil things both in this world and in the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 242. Unchastity is the taint in a woman; niggardliness is the taint in a giver. Taints, indeed, are all evil things, both in this world and the next.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

241-243

No recitation: the ruinous impurity
         of chants.
No initiative: of a household.
Indolence: of beauty.
Heedlessness: of a guard.

In a woman, misconduct is an impurity.
In a donor, stinginess.
Evil deeds are the real impurities
in this world & the next.

More impure than these impurities
is the ultimate impurity:
  ignorance.
Having abandoned this impurity,
monks, you're impurity-free.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
242
Misconduct’s a stain on a woman;
And meanness, on one who would give.
Stains are thus states that are truly unfortunate,
Both in this world and the worlds that are subsequent.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 242 Bad conduct is the taint of woman, greediness the taint of a benefactor; tainted are all evil ways in this world and in the next.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 242
Wrong conduct is the stain of a woman. Stinginess is the stain of a donor.
Evil things are impure - in this world as well as in the other one. [DLMBSFn-V242]
Dhammapada Dhp. 243
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
243. Tato malā malataraṃ avijjā paramaṃ malaṃ
Etaṃ malaṃ pahatvāna nimmalā hotha bhikkhavo.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
243. Tato malā malataraṃ, avijjā paramaṃ malaṃ;
Etaṃ malaṃ pahantvāna, nimmalā hotha bhikkhavo.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. A worse taint than these is ignorance, the greatest taint. Abandoning this taint, be taintless, O Bhikkhus!
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 243. A worse taint than these is ignorance, the worst of all taints. Destroy this one taint and become taintless, O monks!
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

241-243

No recitation: the ruinous impurity
         of chants.
No initiative: of a household.
Indolence: of beauty.
Heedlessness: of a guard.

In a woman, misconduct is an impurity.
In a donor, stinginess.
Evil deeds are the real impurities
in this world & the next.

More impure than these impurities
is the ultimate impurity:
  ignorance.
Having abandoned this impurity,
monks, you're impurity-free.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
243
Ignorance, of stains, is the greatest:
Casting it off, monks, be stainless!
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 243 But there is a taint worse than all taints,--ignorance is the greatest taint. O mendicants! throw off that taint, and become taintless!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 243
[continuing from DhP 242]
Ignorance is the ultimate stain, greater than any of these other stains.
Having abandoned this stain, be pure, monks. [DLMBSFn-V243]
Dhammapada Dhp. 244
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
244. Sujīvaṃ ahirikena kākasūrena dhaṃsinā
Pakkhandinā pagabbhena saṃkiliṭṭhena jīvitaṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
244. Sujīvaṃ ahirikena, kākasūrena dhaṃsinā;
Pakkhandinā pagabbhena, saṃkiliṭṭhena jīvitaṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

IT IS EASY TO LEAD A SHAMELESS LIFE IT IS HARD TO LEAD A MODEST LIFE

  1. Easy is the life of a shameless one who is as impudent as a crow, back-biting, presumptuous, arrogant, and corrupt.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 244. Easy is life for the shameless one who is impudent as a crow, is backbiting and forward, arrogant and corrupt.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

244-245

Life's easy to live
for someone unscrupulous,
  cunning as a crow,
  corrupt, back-biting,
  forward, & brash;
but for someone who's constantly
  scrupulous, cautious,
  observant, sincere,
  pure in his livelihood,
  clean in his pursuits,
         it's hard.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

244

Life, for the
          shameless,
          presumptious,
          audacious,
          offensive,
          immoral,
is lived without struggle.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 244 Life is easy to live for a man who is without shame, a crow hero, a mischief-maker, an insulting, bold, and wretched fellow.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 244
Easy is life for somebody who is shameless, unconscientious,
offensive, braggart, reckless and impure. [DLMBSFn-V244]
Dhammapada Dhp. 245
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
245. Hirimatā ca dujjīvaṃ niccaṃ sucigavesinā
Alīnenāpagabbhena suddhājīvena passatā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
245. Hirīmatā ca dujjīvaṃ, niccaṃ sucigavesinā;
Alīnenāppagabbhena, suddhājīvena passatā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Hard is the life of a modest one who ever seeks purity, is detached, humble, clean in life, and reflective.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 245. Difficult is life for the modest one who always seeks purity, is detached and unassuming, clean in life, and discerning.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

244-245

Life's easy to live
for someone unscrupulous,
  cunning as a crow,
  corrupt, back-biting,
  forward, & brash;
but for someone who's constantly
  scrupulous, cautious,
  observant, sincere,
  pure in his livelihood,
  clean in his pursuits,
         it's hard.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

245

Life, for those who are
          scrupulous,
          tactful,
          punctilious,
          vigilant,
          virtuous,
is truly strenuous.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 245 But life is hard to live for a modest man, who always looks for what is pure, who is disinterested, quiet, spotless, and intelligent.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 245
[continuing from DhP 244]
And difficult is life for somebody who has conscience, is always striving for purity,
sincere and cautious, of clean livelihood and seeing the truth. [DLMBSFn-V245]
Dhammapada Dhp. 246
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
246. Yo pāṇamatipāteti musāvādaṃ ca bhāsati
Loke adinnaṃ ādiyati paradāraṃ ca gacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
246. Yo pāṇamatipāteti, musāvādañca bhāsati;
Loke adinnamādiyati, paradārañca gacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HE WHO DOES NOT OBSERVE THE FIVE PRECEPTS RUINS HIMSELF   BE NOT AVARICIOUS AND DO NO WRONG

246-247. Whoso in this world destroys life, tells lies, takes what is not given, goes to others' wives, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks, such a one digs up his own root in this world.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 246-247. One who destroys life, utters lies, takes what is not given, goes to another man's wife, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks — such a man digs up his own root even in this world.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

246-248

Whoever kills, lies, steals,
goes to someone else's wife,
& is addicted to intoxicants,
  digs himself up
  by the root
right here in this world.

So know, my good man,
that bad deeds are reckless.
Don't let greed & unrighteousness
oppress you with long-term pain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
246 & 247

The taker by theft,
The slayer of life,
One given to drink
Or another man’s wife,
And he in this world
Who delivers untruths,
Are but people who dig themselves
Up by the roots.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 246 He who destroys life, who speaks untruth, who in this world takes what is not given him, who goes to another man's wife;
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 246
Who kills living beings, speaks falsely,
takes whatever in the world is not given and goes to another's wife,
[continued in DhP 247] [DLMBSFn-V246]
Dhammapada Dhp. 247
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
247. Surāmerayapānaṃ ca yo naro anuyuñjati
Idheva poso lokasmiṃ mūlaṃ khaṇati attano.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
247. Surāmerayapānañca, yo naro anuyuñjati;
Idhevameso lokasmiṃ, mūlaṃ khaṇati attano.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3] 246-247. Whoso in this world destroys life, tells lies, takes what is not given, goes to others' wives, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks, such a one digs up his own root in this world.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 246-247. One who destroys life, utters lies, takes what is not given, goes to another man's wife, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks — such a man digs up his own root even in this world.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

246-248

Whoever kills, lies, steals,
goes to someone else's wife,
& is addicted to intoxicants,
  digs himself up
  by the root
right here in this world.

So know, my good man,
that bad deeds are reckless.
Don't let greed & unrighteousness
oppress you with long-term pain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
246 & 247

The taker by theft,
The slayer of life,
One given to drink
Or another man’s wife,
And he in this world
Who delivers untruths,
Are but people who dig themselves
Up by the roots.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 247 And the man who gives himself to drinking intoxicating liquors, he, even in this world, digs up his own root.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 247
[continuing from DhP 246]
And whichever person enjoys drinking alcohol,
he digs out his own roots right here in this world. [DLMBSFn-V247]
Dhammapada Dhp. 248
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
248. Evambho purisa jānāhi pāpadhammā asaññatā
Mā taṃ lobho adhammo ca ciraṃ dukkhāya randhayuṃ.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
248. Evaṃ bho purisa jānāhi, pāpadhammā asaññatā;
Mā taṃ lobho adhammo ca, ciraṃ dukkhāya randhayuṃ.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. Know thus O good man: "Not easy of restraint are evil things". Let not greed and wickedness 5 drag you to protracted misery.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 248. Know this, O good man: evil things are difficult to control. Let not greed and wickedness drag you to protracted misery.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

246-248

Whoever kills, lies, steals,
goes to someone else's wife,
& is addicted to intoxicants,
  digs himself up
  by the root
right here in this world.

So know, my good man,
that bad deeds are reckless.
Don't let greed & unrighteousness
oppress you with long-term pain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
248
That loose living, my dear friend,
Is but evil, comprehend!
Don’t let turpitude and greed,
To long tribulation lead.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 248 O man, know this, that the unrestrained are in a bad state; take care that greediness and vice do not bring thee to grief for a long time!
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 248
My dear man, know this: evil things are difficult to restrain.
Let not greed and injustice bring you suffering for a long time. [DLMBSFn-V248]
Dhammapada Dhp. 249
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
249. Dadāti ve yathā saddhaṃ yathā pasādanaṃ jano
Tattha ve maṅku yo hoti paresaṃ pānabhojane
Na so divā vā rattiṃ vā samādhiṃ adhigacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
249. Dadāti ve yathāsaddhaṃ, yathāpasādanaṃ [yattha pasādanaṃ (katthaci)] jano;
Tattha yo maṅku bhavati [tattha ce maṃku yo hoti (sī.), tattha yo maṅkuto hoti (syā.)], paresaṃ pānabhojane;
Na so divā vā rattiṃ vā, samādhimadhigacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THE ENVIOUS ARE NOT AT PEACE THE UNENVIOUS ARE AT PEACE

  1. People give according to their faith and as they are pleased. Whoever therein is envious of others' food and drink, gains no peace [NāradaFn18-06] either by day or by night.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 249. People give according to their faith or regard. If one becomes discontented with the food and drink given by others, one does not attain meditative absorption, either by day or by night.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

249-250

People give
in line with their faith,
in line with conviction.
Whoever gets flustered
at food & drink given to others,
attains no concentration
by day or by night.

But one in whom this is
  cut    through
  up-    rooted
  wiped out —
attains concentration
by day or by night.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
249 & 250

People’s alms donations
Come from faith and inspiration.
If a bhikkhu feels dejected
By the offerings to others,
Then no inner peace he’ll gain
In the night-time, or the day.

But dejection, if it’s quelled,
If uprooted and expelled,
Then he’ll inner peace regain
Through the night, and through the day.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 249 The world gives according to their faith or according to their pleasure: if a man frets about the food and the drink given to others, he will find no rest either by day or by night.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 249
People give alms according to their faith and gratification.
In this matter, who is discontented with others' food and drink,
he will never attain concentration, by day or night. [DLMBSFn-V249]
Dhammapada Dhp. 250
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
250. Yassa cetaṃ samucchannaṃ mūlaghaccaṃ samūhataṃ
Sa ve divā vā rattiṃ vā samādhiṃ adhigacchati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
250. Yassa cetaṃ samucchinnaṃ, mūlaghaccaṃ [mūlaghacchaṃ (ka.)] samūhataṃ;
Sa ve divā vā rattiṃ vā, samādhimadhigacchati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. But he who has this (feeling) fully cut off, uprooted and destroyed, gains peace by day and by night.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 250. But he in who this (discontent) is fully destroyed, uprooted and extinct, he attains absorption, both by day and by night.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

249-250

People give
in line with their faith,
in line with conviction.
Whoever gets flustered
at food & drink given to others,
attains no concentration
by day or by night.

But one in whom this is
  cut    through
  up-    rooted
  wiped out —
attains concentration
by day or by night.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
249 & 250

People’s alms donations
Come from faith and inspiration.
If a bhikkhu feels dejected
By the offerings to others,
Then no inner peace he’ll gain
In the night-time, or the day.

But dejection, if it’s quelled,
If uprooted and expelled,
Then he’ll inner peace regain
Through the night, and through the day.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 250 He in whom that feeling is destroyed, and taken out with the very root, finds rest by day and by night.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 250
[continued from DhP 249]
And who has cut off, removed and destroyed by the rot such thinking,
he will attain concentration, by day or night. [DLMBSFn-V250]
Dhammapada Dhp. 251
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
251. Natthi rāgasamo aggi natthi dosasamo gaho
Natthi mohasamaṃ jālaṃ natthi taṇhāsamā nadī.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
251. Natthi rāgasamo aggi, natthi dosasamo gaho;
Natthi mohasamaṃ jālaṃ, natthi taṇhāsamā nadī.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

THERE IS NO RIVER LIKE CRAVING

  1. There is no fire like lust, no grip like hate, no net like delusion, no river like craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 251. There is no fire like lust; there is no grip like hatred; there is no net like delusion; there is no river like craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

251

There's no fire like passion,
no seizure like anger,
no snare like delusion,
no river like craving.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
251
There’s no fire like passion;
No captor like hating;
No snare like delusion;
No river like craving.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 251 There is no fire like passion, there is no shark like hatred, there is no snare like folly, there is no torrent like greed.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 251
There is no fire like passion. There is no grasp like hatred.
There is no net like delusion. There is no river like thirst. [DLMBSFn-V251]
Dhammapada Dhp. 252
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
252. Sudassaṃ vajjamaññesaṃ attano pana duddasaṃ
Paresaṃ hi so vajjāni opuṇāti yathā bhūsaṃ
Attano pana chādeti kaliṃ'va kitavā saṭho.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
252. Sudassaṃ vajjamaññesaṃ, attano pana duddasaṃ;
Paresaṃ hi so vajjāni, opunāti [ophunāti (ka.)] yathā bhusaṃ;
Attano pana chādeti, kaliṃva kitavā saṭho.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

EASY TO SEE ARE OTHERS' FAULTS

  1. Easily seen are others' faults, hard indeed to see are one's own. Like chaff one winnows others' faults, but one's own (faults) one hides, as a crafty fowler conceals himself [NāradaFn18-07] by camouflage. [NāradaFn18-08]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 252. Easily seen is the fault of others, but one's own fault is difficult to see. Like chaff one winnows another's faults, but hides one's own, even as a crafty fowler hides behind sham branches.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

252-253

It's easy to see
the errors of others,
but hard to see
your own.
You winnow like chaff
the errors of others,
but conceal your own —
like a cheat, an unlucky throw.

If you focus on the errors of others,
constantly finding fault,
your effluents flourish.
You're far from their ending.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
252
Easy to see are another man’s flaws;
Harder to see are the faults that are yours.
Though you winnow like chaff what are other folks’ failings,
You act like a card-sharp, your ‘losing hand’ veiling.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 252 The fault of others is easily perceived, but that of oneself is difficult to perceive; a man winnows his neighbour's faults like chaff, but his own fault he hides, as a cheat hides the bad die from the gambler.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 252
Easy to see are faults of others; one's own faults are difficult to see.
One exposes the faults of others like husks.
One's own conceals like a cheating player of dice an unlucky throw. [DLMBSFn-V252]
Dhammapada Dhp. 253
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
253. Paravajjānupassissa niccaṃ ujjhānasaññino
Āsavā tassa vaḍḍhanti ārā so āsavakkhayā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
253. Paravajjānupassissa , niccaṃ ujjhānasaññino;
Āsavā tassa vaḍḍhanti, ārā so āsavakkhayā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

DEFILEMENTS MULTIPLY IN THOSE WHO SEEK OTHERS' FAULTS

  1. He who sees others' faults, and is ever irritable - the corruptions of such a one grow. He is far from the destruction of corruptions. [NāradaFn18-09]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 253. He who seeks another's faults, who is ever censorious — his cankers grow. He is far from destruction of the cankers.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

252-253

It's easy to see
the errors of others,
but hard to see
your own.
You winnow like chaff
the errors of others,
but conceal your own —
like a cheat, an unlucky throw.

If you focus on the errors of others,
constantly finding fault,
your effluents flourish.
You're far from their ending.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
253
If a man ever heeds
Other persons’ misdeeds,
And is always offended,
His taints are distended.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 253 If a man looks after the faults of others, and is always inclined to be offended, his own passions will grow, and he is far from the destruction of passions.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 253
Who finds faults with others and is always irritable,
his taints only grow. He is far away from dissolution of taints. [DLMBSFn-V253]
Dhammapada Dhp. 254
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
254. Ākāse padaṃ natthi samaṇo natthi bāhire
Papañcābhiratā pajā nippapañcā tathāgatā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
254. Ākāseva padaṃ natthi, samaṇo natthi bāhire;
Papañcābhiratā pajā, nippapañcā tathāgatā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

OUTSIDE THERE ARE NO SAINTS WHO HAVE REALISED NIBBĀNA   THERE ARE NO AGGREGATES WHICH ARE ETERNAL

  1. In the sky there is no track. Outside 10 there is no Saint. [NāradaFn18-11] Mankind delights in obstacles. [NāradaFn18-12] The Tathāgatas [NāradaFn18-13] are free from obstacles.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 254. There is no track in the sky, and no recluse outside (the Buddha's dispensation). Mankind delights in worldliness, but the Buddhas are free from worldliness. [BudRkFn-v254-255]
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

254-255 [ThaniSFn-V254-255]

There's no trail in space,
no outside contemplative.
People are smitten
with objectifications,
but devoid of objectification are
the Tathagatas.

There's no trail in space,
no outside contemplative,
no eternal fabrications,
no wavering in the Awakened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
254a
Roads don’t pass up through the sky,
So, off the Path, no saints do lie. [VaradoFn-V254a]

254b
Though people relish Self-perceptions, [VaradoFn-V254b]
Buddhas have no such conceptions.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 254 There is no path through the air, a man is not a Samana by outward acts. The world delights in vanity, the Tathagatas (the Buddhas) are free from vanity.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 254
There are no tracks in the sky. There is not a true monk outside of this teaching.
Mankind delights in obsession. The Buddhas are free of obsession. [DLMBSFn-V254]
Dhammapada Dhp. 255
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
255. Ākāse padaṃ natthi samaṇo natthi bāhire
Saṅkhārā sassatā natthi natthi buddhānaṃ iñjitaṃ.

Malavaggo aṭṭhārasamo.

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
255. Ākāseva padaṃ natthi, samaṇo natthi bāhire;
Saṅkhārā sassatā natthi, natthi buddhānamiñjitaṃ.

Malavaggo aṭṭhārasamo niṭṭhito.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. In the sky there is no track. Outside there is no Saint. There are no conditioned things [NāradaFn18-14] that are eternal. There is no instability 15 in the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 255. There is no track in the sky, and no recluse outside (the Buddha's dispensation). There are no conditioned things that are eternal, and no instability in the Buddhas.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

254-255 [ThaniSFn-V254-255]

There's no trail in space,
no outside contemplative.
People are smitten
with objectifications,
but devoid of objectification are
the Tathagatas.

There's no trail in space,
no outside contemplative,
no eternal fabrications,
no wavering in the Awakened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
255a
Roads don’t pass up through the sky,
So, off the Path, no saints do lie.

255b
Though nothing’s endless in creation,
Buddhas have no agitation.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 255 There is no path through the air, a man is not a Samana by outward acts. No creatures are eternal; but the awakened (Buddha) are never shaken.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 255
There are no tracks in the sky. There is not a true monk outside of this teaching.
There are no conditioned things that are eternal. There is no instability in the Buddhas. [DLMBSFn-V255]
Dhammapada Dhp. 256
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
  1. Dhammaṭṭhavaggo.
256. Na tena hoti dhammaṭṭho yenatthaṃ sahasā naye
Yo ca atthaṃ anatthañca ubho niccheyya paṇḍito.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]

19. Dhammaṭṭhavaggo

256. Na tena hoti dhammaṭṭho, yenatthaṃ sāhasā [sahasā (sī. syā. ka.)] naye;
Yo ca atthaṃ anatthañca, ubho niccheyya paṇḍito.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

Chapter 19 The Just Or Righteous

THE JUST SHOULD MAKE A PROPER INVESTIGATION   THE IMPARTIAL ARE CALLED THE TRUE JUSTICES

  1. He is not thereby just because he hastily arbitrates cases. The wise man should investigate both right and wrong.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4]

Dhp XIX The Just

256. Not by passing arbitrary judgments does a man become just; a wise man is he who investigates both right and wrong.

Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

Dhp XIX The Judge

256-257 [ThaniSFn-V256-257]

To pass judgment hurriedly
doesn't mean you're a judge.
The wise one, weighing both
the right judgment & wrong,
judges others impartially —
unhurriedly, in line with the Dhamma,
  guarding the Dhamma,
  guarded by Dhamma,
intelligent:
he's called a judge.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]

Chapter 19 Equity

256
No man is he of equity
Who judges cases hastily;
But one who sifts the wrong from right
Is one who’s truly erudite.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7]

Chapter XIX: The Just

256, 257. A man is not just if he carries a matter by violence; no, he who distinguishes both right and wrong, who is learned and leads others, not by violence, but by law and equity, and who is guarded by the law and intelligent, he is called just.

Cited from DLMBS [8]

Chapter 1: The Righteous

DhP 256
One is not called righteous because one hastily judges what is good.
Which wise person has thoroughly investigated both right and wrong,
[continued in DhP 257] [DLMBSFn-V256]
Dhammapada Dhp. 257
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
257. Asāhasena dhammena samena nayatī pare
Dhammassa gutto medhāvī dhammaṭṭho'ti pavuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
257. Asāhasena dhammena, samena nayatī pare;
Dhammassa gutto medhāvī, ‘‘dhammaṭṭho’’ti pavuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. The intelligent person who leads others not falsely but lawfully and impartially, who is a guardian of the law, is called one who abides by the law (dhammaññha).
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 257. He who does not judge others arbitrarily, but passes judgment impartially according to the truth, that sagacious man is a guardian of law and is called just.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

256-257 [ThaniSFn-V256-257]

To pass judgment hurriedly
doesn't mean you're a judge.
The wise one, weighing both
the right judgment & wrong,
judges others impartially —
unhurriedly, in line with the Dhamma,
  guarding the Dhamma,
  guarded by Dhamma,
intelligent:
he's called a judge.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
257
The one who judges patiently,
And lawfully, impartially,
Astute, upholding probity,
Is called a man of equity.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 256, 257. A man is not just if he carries a matter by violence; no, he who distinguishes both right and wrong, who is learned and leads others, not by violence, but by law and equity, and who is guarded by the law and intelligent, he is called just.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 257
[continued from DhP 256]
judging others without haste, justly and impartially,
such a wise person, guardian of law, is called "righteous". [DLMBSFn-V257]
Dhammapada Dhp. 258
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
258. Na tena paṇḍito hoti yāvatā bahu bhāsati
Khemī averī abhayo paṇḍito'ti pavuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
258. Na tena paṇḍito hoti, yāvatā bahu bhāsati;
Khemī averī abhayo, ‘‘paṇḍito’’ti pavuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE IS NOT DEEMED WISE BECAUSE ONE IS GARRULOUS

  1. One is not thereby a learned man merely because one speaks much. He who is secure, without hate, and fearless is called "learned".
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 258. One is not wise because one speaks much. He who is peaceable, friendly and fearless is called wise.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

258-259

Simply talking a lot
doesn't mean one is wise.
Whoever's secure —
  no     hostility,
     fear —
is said to be wise.

Simply talking a lot
doesn't maintain the Dhamma.
Whoever
 — although he's heard next to nothing —
  sees Dhamma through his body,
  is not heedless of Dhamma:
he's one who maintains the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
258
One can’t be called knowledgeable
If merely voluble,
But if one’s peaceable,
Fearless and genial.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 258 A man is not learned because he talks much; he who is patient, free from hatred and fear, he is called learned.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 258
One is not called wise because one speaks a lot.
One, who is peaceful, without hatred and fearless, is called "wise". [DLMBSFn-V258]
Dhammapada Dhp. 259
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
259. Na tāvatā dhammadharā yāvatā bahu bhāsati
Yo ca appampi sutvāna dhammaṃ kāyena passati
Sa ve dhammadharo hoti yo dhammaṃ nappamajjati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
259. Na tāvatā dhammadharo, yāvatā bahu bhāsati;
Yo ca appampi sutvāna, dhammaṃ kāyena passati;
Sa ve dhammadharo hoti, yo dhammaṃ nappamajjati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GARRULOUSNESS IS NOT A CHARACTERISTIC OF ONE WHO KNOWS THE DHAMMA

  1. One is not versed in the Dhamma merely because one speaks too much. He who hears little and sees the Dhamma mentally, [NāradaFn19-01] and who does not neglect the Dhamma, is, indeed, versed in the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 259. A man is not versed in Dhamma because he speaks much. He who, after hearing a little Dhamma, realizes its truth directly and is not heedless of it, is truly versed in the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

258-259 [ThaniSFn-V259]

Simply talking a lot
doesn't mean one is wise.
Whoever's secure —
  no     hostility,
     fear —
is said to be wise.

Simply talking a lot
doesn't maintain the Dhamma.
Whoever
 — although he's heard next to nothing —
  sees Dhamma through his body,
  is not heedless of Dhamma:
he's one who maintains the Dhamma.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
259
He’s not a Dhamma specialist,
The one who merely speechifies;
But one, not lax, who learns a bit,
Then Dhamma does he realise.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 259 A man is not a supporter of the law because he talks much; even if a man has learnt little, but sees the law bodily, he is a supporter of the law, a man who never neglects the law.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 259
One does not understand Dharma only because one speaks a lot.
Who sees Dharma directly, after having heard even a little of it,
and who does not neglect the Dharma, such a one does understand it. [DLMBSFn-V259]
Dhammapada Dhp. 260
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
260. Na tena thero hoti yenassa palitaṃ siro
Paripakko vayo tassa moghajiṇṇo'ti vuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
260. Na tena thero so hoti [thero hoti (sī. syā.)], yenassa palitaṃ siro;
Paripakko vayo tassa, ‘‘moghajiṇṇo’’ti vuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

GREY HAIR ALONE MAKES NOT A THERA   HE IS A THERA WHO IS STAINLESS

  1. He is not thereby an elder (thera [NāradaFn19-02] ) merely because his head is grey. Ripe is he in age. "Old-in-vain" is he called.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 260. A monk is not an elder because his head is gray. He is but ripe in age, and he is called one grown old in vain.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

260-261

A head of gray hairs
doesn't mean one's an elder.
Advanced in years,
one's called an old fool.

But one in whom there is
  truth, restraint,
  rectitude, gentleness,
  self-control —
he's called an elder,
  his impurities disgorged,
     enlightened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
260
A monk’s not deemed ‘an Elder’
Through hair that’s turning grey.
If he’s just matured in age,
He’s deemed ‘matured-in-vain’.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 260 A man is not an elder because his head is grey; his age may be ripe, but he is called 'Old-in-vain.'
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 260
One is not to be called an Elder just because his head is gray.
Such a person is of mature age and is called "grown old in vain". [DLMBSFn-V260]
Dhammapada Dhp. 261
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
261. Yamhi saccaṃ ca dhammo ca ahiṃsā saṃyamo damo
Sa ve vantamalo dhīro thero iti pavuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
261. Yamhi saccañca dhammo ca, ahiṃsā saṃyamo damo;
Sa ve vantamalo dhīro, ‘‘thero’’ iti [so theroti (syā. ka.)] pavuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. In whom are truth, [NāradaFn19-03] virtue, [NāradaFn19-04] harmlessness, restraint [NāradaFn19-05] and control, that wise man who is purged of impurities, [NāradaFn19-06] is, indeed, called an elder.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 261. One in whom there is truthfulness, virtue, inoffensiveness, restraint and self-mastery, who is free from defilements and is wise — he is truly called an Elder.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

260-261

A head of gray hairs
doesn't mean one's an elder.
Advanced in years,
one's called an old fool.

But one in whom there is
  truth, restraint,
  rectitude, gentleness,
  self-control —
he's called an elder,
  his impurities disgorged,
     enlightened.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
261
The bhikkhu of goodness and honesty,
Who’s peaceful, good-natured and tamed,
Who’s resolute, purged of impurity,
Is ‘Elder’ deservedly named.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 261 He in whom there is truth, virtue, love, restraint, moderation, he who is free from impurity and is wise, he is called an elder.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 261
In whom there is truth, Law, non-violence, restraint and self-control,
he, the wise one who has discarded taints, is called "an Elder". [DLMBSFn-V261]
Dhammapada Dhp. 262
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
262. Na vākkaraṇamattena vaṇṇapokkharatāya vā
Sādhurūpo naro hoti issukī maccharī saṭho.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
262. Na vākkaraṇamattena, vaṇṇapokkharatāya vā;
Sādhurūpo naro hoti, issukī maccharī saṭho.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

NOT BY HANDSOME APPEARANCE DOES ONE BECOME GOOD-NATURED   GOOD-NATURED IS HE WHO HAS GIVEN UP JEALOUSY ETC.

  1. Not by mere eloquence, nor by handsome appearance, does a man become good-natured, should he be jealous, selfish, and deceitful.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 262. Not by mere eloquence nor by beauty of form does a man become accomplished, if he is jealous, selfish and deceitful.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

262-263

Not by suave conversation
or lotus-like coloring
does an envious, miserly cheat
become an exemplary man.

But one in whom this is
  cut    through
  up-    rooted
  wiped out —
he's called exemplary,
  his aversion disgorged,
     intelligent.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
262 & 263

Not merely polished rhetoric,
Nor features that are beauteous,
Denote that someone’s excellent
Who’s stingy, sly and envious.

But, if these stains are quelled,
If uprooted and expelled,
Then, the sage who’s purged malevolence,
Is correctly known as excellent.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 262 An envious greedy, dishonest man does not become respectable by means of much talking only, or by the beauty of his complexion.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 262
Not only by the act of speech or by beauty of complexion
is a man respectable, if he is envious, selfish and deceitful. [DLMBSFn-V262]
Dhammapada Dhp. 263
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
263. Yassa ce taṃ samucchinnaṃ mūlaghaccaṃ samūhataṃ
Sa vantadoso medhāvī sādhurūpo'ti vuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
263. Yassa cetaṃ samucchinnaṃ, mūlaghaccaṃ samūhataṃ;
Sa vantadoso medhāvī, ‘‘sādhurūpo’’ti vuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]
  1. But in whom these are wholly cut off, uprooted and extinct, that wise man who is purged of hatred, is, indeed, called good-natured.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 263. But he in whom these are wholly destroyed, uprooted and extinct, and who has cast out hatred — that wise man is truly accomplished.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

262-263

Not by suave conversation
or lotus-like coloring
does an envious, miserly cheat
become an exemplary man.

But one in whom this is
  cut    through
  up-    rooted
  wiped out —
he's called exemplary,
  his aversion disgorged,
     intelligent.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
262 & 263

Not merely polished rhetoric,
Nor features that are beauteous,
Denote that someone’s excellent
Who’s stingy, sly and envious.

But, if these stains are quelled,
If uprooted and expelled,
Then, the sage who’s purged malevolence,
Is correctly known as excellent.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 263 He in whom all this is destroyed, and taken out with the very root, he, when freed from hatred and wise, is called respectable.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 263
And who has cut off, removed and destroyed by the rot such thinking,
he, the wise one who has discarded hatred, is called "respectable". [DLMBSFn-V263]
Dhammapada Dhp. 264
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
264. Na muṇḍakena samaṇo abbato alikaṃ bhaṇaṃ
Icchālobhasamāpanno samaṇo kiṃ bhavissati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
264. Na muṇḍakena samaṇo, abbato alikaṃ bhaṇaṃ;
Icchālobhasamāpanno, samaṇo kiṃ bhavissati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

A SHAVEN HEAD DOES NOT MAKE ONE A MONK

  1. Not by a shaven head does an undisciplined man, [NāradaFn19-07] who utters lies, become a monk. How will one who is full of desire and greed be a monk?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 264. Not by shaven head does a man who is indisciplined and untruthful become a monk. How can he who is full of desire and greed be a monk?
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

264-265

A shaven head
doesn't mean a contemplative.
The liar observing no duties,
filled with greed & desire:
what kind of contemplative's he?

But whoever tunes out
the dissonance
of his evil qualities
 — large or small —
in every way
by bringing evil to consonance:
  he's called a contemplative.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
264
By shaving one’s head one is not a recluse.
The shaveling who’s lawless, who utters untruths,
Brimful of wishes, and laden with greed,
How could such a one a recluse be, indeed?
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 264 Not by tonsure does an undisciplined man who speaks falsehood become a Samana; can a man be a Samana who is still held captive by desire and greediness?
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 264
One is not to be called a monk just because of his bald head, if one is immoral and speaking lies.
How can someone who has desire and greed be called a monk? [DLMBSFn-V264]
Dhammapada Dhp. 265
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
265. Yo ca sameti pāpāni aṇuṃ thūlāni sabbaso
Samitattā hi pāpānaṃ samaṇo'ti pavuccati.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
265. Yo ca sameti pāpāni, aṇuṃ thūlāni sabbaso;
Samitattā hi pāpānaṃ, ‘‘samaṇo’’ti pavuccati.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

HE IS A MONK WHO HAS OVERCOME EVIL

  1. He who wholly subdues evil deeds both small and great is called a monk because he has overcome all evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 265. He who wholly subdues evil both small and great is called a monk, because he has overcome all evil.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

264-265 [ThaniSFn-V265]

A shaven head
doesn't mean a contemplative.
The liar observing no duties,
filled with greed & desire:
what kind of contemplative's he?

But whoever tunes out
the dissonance
of his evil qualities
 — large or small —
in every way
by bringing evil to consonance:
  he's called a contemplative.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
265
With the eradication of all forms of evil conduct, either gross or subtle, one becomes truly an ascetic.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 265 He who always quiets the evil, whether small or large, he is called a Samana (a quiet man), because he has quieted all evil.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 265
Who conquers evil thoroughly, be it small or big,
one is called a monk because of having conquered all evils. [DLMBSFn-V265]
Dhammapada Dhp. 266
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]
266. Na tena bhikkhū hoti yāvatā bhikkhate pare
Vissaṃ dhammaṃ samādāya bhikkhu hoti na tāvatā.
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2]
266. Na tena bhikkhu so hoti, yāvatā bhikkhate pare;
Vissaṃ dhammaṃ samādāya, bhikkhu hoti na tāvatā.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Nārada Thera ) [3]

ONE DOES NOT BECOME A BHIKKHU MERELY BY BEGGING   HE WHO IS HOLY IS CALLED A BHIKKHU

  1. He is not thereby a bhikkhu [NāradaFn19-08] merely because he begs from others; by following the whole code (of morality [NāradaFn19-09] ) one certainly becomes a bhikkhu and not (merely) by such begging.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] 266. He is not a monk just because he lives on others' alms. Not by adopting outward form does one become a true monk.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu ) [5]

266-267

Begging from others
doesn't mean one's a monk.
As long as one follows
householders' ways,
one is no monk at all.

But whoever puts aside
both merit & evil and,
living the chaste life,
  judiciously
goes through the world:
he's called a monk.
Translated from the Pali by Ven. Varado Bhikkhu ) [6]
266
A bhikkhu is one who commits
To the whole of the training, not bits. [VaradoFn-V266]
Those people could never be said
True bhikkhus to be, who just beg.
Translated from the Pali by Friedrich Max Müller) [7] 266 A man is not a mendicant (Bhikshu) simply because he asks others for alms; he who adopts the whole law is a Bhikshu, not he who only begs.
Cited from DLMBS [8]
DhP 266
One is not a monk because one begs almsfood from others.
If one follows the life of a householder, one is not a monk because of that. [DLMBSFn-V266]
Dhammapada Dhp. 267
Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1]